Crec tah new Deal Lesson



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CREC TAH New Deal Lesson
Unit Overview: The Great Depression and New Deal
Unit EQ: How do we ensure that everyone has access to the American Dream?

The stock market crash of 1929 signaled for many people the end of the Roaring ’20 and the start of the Great Depression. This was the worst economic crisis America ever faced. Businesses closed, millions were unemployed, and farmers lost their land. Children went hungry and homeless people roamed the lands. When Franklin D. Roosevelt became president, he ushered in a new role for government. He reassured people by saying “the only thing we have to fear is fear itself” and he promised people “A New Deal.” His New Deal dramatically increased the role and responsibility of government to help people and prevent future economic catastrophes.

In this unit you will examine the impact of the Great Depression and how as a result President Franklin D. Roosevelt reshaped the role of government in our lives. You will also evaluate how and why certain groups fared better under the New Deal than other groups did.
Unit Questions:

1. What was the impact of the Great Depression and New Deal on individuals and groups including women, African-Americans, Mexican-Americans, Native-Americans unionized workers, farmers, and the wealthy?

2. How did the Great Depression and New Deal reshape the role of government in our lives?

3. What makes a great president?


Vocabulary:


Roaring ‘20s

Great Migration

Bank runs

Stock market crash

Dust Bowl

Civilian Conservation Corps

Agricultural Administration Act

Securities and Exchange Commission

Public Works Administration

Works Progress Administration

Minimum wage law

40-hour work week

Social Security

National Industrial Recovery Act

Wagner Act

AFL-CIO


Eleanor Roosevelt

Harry Hopkins

Frances Perkins

Black Cabinet

Scottsboro case

Opposition to New Deal:



  • Liberty League,

  • Share-the-Wealth Clubs

  • Huey Long,

  • Townsend Clubs



Copyright: Wendy Nelson Kauffman

LESSON PLAN

Date: Class: 9th grade US History Block: 90 minute class (following is 2 days)

Big Idea: Great Depression and New Deal:

Essential Question for unit: How do we ensure that everyone has access to the American Dream?

Learning Objectives: Students will:

Know: the impact of the New Deal and Great Depression on women, African-Americans, Mexican-Americans, Native-Americans
Understand: though the Depression’s impact was nationwide, some groups were hit harder than others by the Depression

Be Able to do: analyze primary and secondary sources
Schema: Listen to “Brother can you spare a dime?” (response to song, questions?)

Guiding questions:



  • Who faces hard times?

  • What images in the lyrics convey the struggle?

  • What does he mean by the expression: “full of that Yankee Doodly Dum?”

  • Why is he reminding people of his name, “Al”?

  • Does Al believe the government have a responsibility to help him? Why?

  • How does the music set the tone for the 1930s?


Model: Review art walk photos from yesterday. What struggles did we see? Who did the government help? How? Teacher explains how these photos could be used as a storyboard for the middle class/working class white man. Theme song could be “Brother, Can you Spare a Dime”(today’s schema)

Practice: 1. Discuss “Brother can you spare a dime.” Ask students for their response and questions. Review the guiding questions (shown above with schema)

2. Review class assignment using assignment directions. Questions? (see directions for how students will proceed with activity in class.)

3. In groups of 4-6 students create a storyboard with 8 photos and a theme song for your presentation. (complete in class, or at home)
4. (day 2) Share storyboards and songs with class. Audience must fill out worksheet for each presentation . Give peer feedback after each presentation. What questions do you have? What did you like about the presentation? What would you suggest to improve it? In terms of content: what was the most important information you learned? Do you agree with what the group needs to do to improve their situation? What else would you suggest? (call on students to answer audience worksheet below)

1. How were (women, African-Americans, Mexican-Americans, Native Americans) affected by the Great Depression?



  1. How did the New Deal help (women, African-Americans, Mexican-Americans, Native Americans)?

  2. What more could the government have done to help?

  3. What else could be done to help improve the situation of (women, African-Americans, Mexican-Americans, Native Americans) ?

5. Discuss findings when all student presentations are done. Why are some groups helped more than others? Is that still true today? Any analogies with today’s recession and government help? What responsibility does the government have? Why did it not do more in the 1930s?


Closure:

Ask students to summarize conclusions they draw from today’s assignment about the New Deal’s impact on different groups.



Homework: finish storyboard and song from day 1, if not completed in class.
Assessment: grade presentations and audience participation
Materials: textbook addendum, assignment directions with list of resources, electronic photos and artwork (Smithsonian “1934”) in class server, “Brother Can you Spare a dime” song and hard copy of lyrics, photo storyboard chart (electronic TAH file), peer assessment worksheet.
File name: CREC TAH new deal lesson

Comments:

Ms. Nelson Kauffman

US History
**note to TAH supervisors: This addendum is necessary as only one paragraph each in our textbook mentions the impact of the Depression on woman and African-Americans. Nothing is noted about the impact on Mexican-Americans and Native-Americans. This information and especially primary sources was difficult to locate for the last two groups, which is telling about their role in society during the 1930s (and maybe in 2010?)
Textbook Addendum
The stock market crash of 1929 signaled for many people the end of the Roaring ’20 and the start of the Great Depression. This was the worst economic crisis America ever faced. Businesses closed, millions were unemployed, and farmers lost their land. Children went hungry and homeless people roamed the lands. To put the numbers in perspective consider the description by historian Eric Rauchway:

“When the unemployment rate ran to around a quarter of the workforce in 1932, about 11.5 million Americans had no work. To put this in some perspective, we might imagine that nearly the entire population of New York, then the most populous state, had no jobs: that the easternmost tip of Long Island to the shores of Lake Erie, from the Canadian border to Pennsylvania, nobody had work. But this perspective does not give quite the right picture. Some of the people of New York-children, dependent wives-would ordinarily have held no formal jobs. And the 11.5 million out of work represented only the workers who had no paycheck. Many of them had families that depended on them for a living. So the 11.5 million who had no jobs represented something like thirty million Americans who had lost their source of income. (p. 40)



When Franklin D. Roosevelt became president, he ushered in a new role for government. He reassured people by saying “the only thing we have to fear is fear itself” and he promised people “A New Deal.” His New Deal dramatically increased the role and responsibility of government to help people and prevent future economic catastrophes.
Though the impact of the Great Depression was felt nationwide, the impact was more severe for certain groups, and not everyone benefited equally from the New Deal. This addendum to your textbook provides information on how four different groups were affected by the Great Depression: women, African-Americans, Mexican-Americans, and Native Americans.
New Deal and Women
Women in the 1930s were largely responsible for taking care of the family, while the husband was the breadwinner. When their husband’s income dropped, women had to budget money accordingly to provide for their family. Women were resourceful in finding ways to save money. For example, they watered down milk, bought day-old bread and used old blankets to re-line old coats. Little was thrown out because later on it might come in handy.
Women also looked for jobs to help support their struggling families. In many cases they faced a lot of discrimination. Women were paid less than men doing the same job. Women also tended to find jobs in lower-paying fields, like domestic work (“maids”) or sweatshops doing sewing. Many women had been teachers and clerical workers, so the massive lay-offs in government and teaching jobs during the Depression especially hurt women. The overwhelming feeling among Americans (including women) was that wives should not work if their husbands had jobs. About 75% of school systems said married women had to be fired and federal law prohibited more than one family member from working for the civil service. People worried that any working woman was taking a job from a man.
Despite these struggles, some women attained high positions and fought for women’s rights. Frances Perkins became the Secretary of Labor, achieving a milestone as the first woman in any President’s cabinet. First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was a trend-setter by becoming an activist First Lady who stood up for the rights of women, African-Americans and other dispossessed people. Other female accomplishments included Margaret Mitchell winning the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 for Gone with the Wind. Amelia Earhart in 1932 became the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic. Babe Didrikson won several medals for track and field events in the 1932 Olympics.
The New Deal was not always a fair deal for women. The minimum wage law allowed women to be paid less than men. Many government jobs were created in construction, which tended to hire men. Many federal relief agencies like the Civil Works Administration and Federal Emergency Relief Administration hired only one woman for every eight to ten men. The Civilian Conservation Corps was limited to young men. Many women were in jobs that were not covered by the Social Security Act.
Women during the New Deal:

Primary Source: Federal Writer’s project: http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/wpaintro/exinterv.html

Surrogate image: Pitcairn, Pennsylvania. May 1943. Twins Amy and Mary Rose Lindich, 21, employed at the Pennsylvania railroad as car repairmen helpers, earning $.72 per hour. They reside in Jeanette, Pennsylvania, and carpool with fellow workers. Marjory Collins. Photograph, 1943. (LC-USW3-30027-E).

Name: Anna Novak Birth: Wisconsin, about 30 years ago Ethnicity: Polish

Family: Married with two children, boys, ages 10 and 13

Education: 8th grade and one and a half years of high school in St. Hedwig's Orphanage

Occupation: Packing House Worker Location: Chicago, Illinois

Date: April 25-27, 1939 Interviewer: Betty Burke

Interview Excerpt: "How long have you worked in the stockyards?"


"I've had eight years of the yards. It's a lot different now, with the union and all. We used to have to buy the foremen presents, you know. On all the holidays, Xmas, Easter, Holy Week, Good Friday, you'd see the men coming to work with hip pockets bulging and take the foremen off in corners, handing over their half pints...Your job wasn't worth much if you didn't observe the holiday "customs." The women had to bring 'em bottles, just the same as the men. You could get along swell if you let the boss slap you on the behind...I'd rather work any place but in the stockyards just for that reason alone."

Transcript #07051009



African-Americans
During the Depression, many African-Americans suffered from discrimination. They were often the last hired and first fired. For example, in Pittsburgh 48% of African-American workers were jobless in 1933, compared to 31% of white laborers. African-Americans were relegated to the most menial jobs. About 75% of African-Americans during the 1930s lived in the south with its demeaning Jim Crow laws and voting restrictions. In the famous Scottsboro case, nine African-Americans who were riding in an Alabama train car with two white women were convicted of raping them. After being nearly lynched, eight of the men were sentenced to death, and the youngest who was 12 years old was imprisoned. The women, known prostitutes, had lied about the crime and doctors at the trial testified that no rape had occurred. The case outraged northerners.

For many African-Americans, Franklin D. Roosevelt was the most popular president since Abraham Lincoln. Unlike past presidents, Roosevelt had many black advisors known as “the black cabinet.” By 1936 African-Americans were for the first time overwhelmingly voting Democratic instead of Republican. First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt often came to the defense of African-Americans. For example, the Daughters of the American Revolution in 1939 banned the acclaimed black singer (and Connecticut resident) Marian Anderson from performing at the famous Constitution Hall in Washington DC. In response Eleanor Roosevelt resigned from the Daughters of the American Revolution and arranged to have Anderson perform at a free open-air concert at Lincoln Memorial on Easter Sunday.

Though the New Deal aided African-Americans, civil rights accomplishments were limited. Despite lobbying by Eleanor Roosevelt, President Roosevelt never approved federal laws to ban lynching or outlaw the poll tax because he did not want to lose southern white votes. About 40% of African-Americans were sharecroppers or tenant farmers in the South and often times the Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA) forced them off the land. Much of government-subsidized housing allowed segregation. The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was also racially segregated. Social Security and minimum wage laws often did not apply to many jobs that African-Americans held, such as waiters, cooks, janitors, farm workers, and domestics. The National Recovery Act (NRA) actually authorized lower pay scales for African-Americans. However, some programs, like the Works Progress Administration (WPA) helped to provide jobs to African-Americans in Northern cities. WPA director, Harold Ickes had several African-Americans on his staff and provided substantial money to African-American schools and hospitals in the South.

African-Americans during the New Deal

Primary Source: Federal Writer’s project: http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/wpaintro/exinterv.html

Surrogate image: Hormel meatpacking plant, Austin, Minnesota, 1941. John Vachon. Photograph, 1941.

Name: Jim Cole Ethnicity: African-American Occupation: Packing House Worker

Location: Chicago, Illinois Date: May 18, 1938

Interviewer: Betty Burke

Interview Excerpt: "Where do you work in the packing house?"


"I'm working in the Beef Kill section. Butcher on the chain. Been in the place twenty years, I believe. You got to have a certain amount of skill to do the job I'm doing. Long ago, I wanted to join the AFL union, the Amalgamated Butchers and Meat Cutters, they called it, and wouldn't take me. Wouldn't let me in the Union. Never said it to my face, but reason of it was plain. Negro. That's it. Just didn't want a Negro man to have what he should. That's wrong. You know that's wrong."

Transcript #07050602


Mexican-Americans
During the Great Depression 400,000 Mexican-Americans, many of them born in the United States, were sent back to Mexico in order to reduce the number of people getting relief money from the government or taking jobs from native-born Americans. In some cases the government forcefully removed Mexican immigrants, as well as Mexicans born in the US. In other cases, the government provided these “braceros” or farm workers an incentive to leave by giving them a free one-way train ticket to Mexico. Some Mexican-Americans chose to leave voluntarily as jobs were scarce and discrimination against them was high. Before the 1930s farmers had eagerly hired Mexican-Americans as they were inexpensive labor and rarely joined unions or “caused trouble.” However, that view began to change after some long and violent strikes involving Mexican-Americans. For example, in the San Joaquin valley in California 18,000 cotton pickers in 1933 went on strike. In response, the farm owners evicted strikers from the camps they lived in, and two Mexican-American strikers were killed when multiple gun shots were fired at their union headquarters.
Shortly before the stock market crash, the American Federation of Labor and municipal governments pressured the federal government to reduce the number of Mexican immigrants. In response the government began more strictly enforcing the laws and began applying literacy tests to Mexicans trying to enter the U.S. In addition, the Bureau of Immigration began aggressively searching for undocumented Mexicans. Many Americans believed these illegal workers were taking jobs from native-born Americans and receiving government relief during a time when money was scarce. About 82,000 Americans were involuntarily deported by the federal government.

States and cities also pressured poor Mexican-Americans to leave. For example, in 1935 the California Relief Administration began denying public aid to Mexicans. In Los Angeles the police raided a downtown park and detained about 400 adults and children. This kind of harassment, a lack of jobs, threat of deportation and fear of losing relief payments encouraged tens of thousands of Mexican-Americans to leave the United States. According to the federal census, the number of Mexican-born population in the US dropped from 617,000 in 1930 to 377,000 in 1940. In Texas and Los Angeles the Mexican population dropped by one-third. About half the people who moved to Mexico were actually U.S. citizens.

The New Deal offered slight help to Mexican-Americans. The Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA) was created to help property-owning farmers, not migrant workers. Migrant workers were also not eligible for Social Security or minimum wage, and the Wagner Act did not protect farm workers unions. Efforts to unionize Mexican-Americans were largely met with violence and legal action. Though the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) and Works Progress Administration (WPA) did hire unemployed Mexican-Americans, those who were migrant workers were ineligible because they did not meet residency requirements. However, the Farm Security Administration (FSA) did set up camps for migrant workers in California. Much of this help however, came too late for Mexican-Americans as dispossessed white farm workers from the Dust Bowl states took these farming jobs.

Mexican-Americans during the New Deal

Primary Source: Federal Writer’s project:

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?wpa:87:./temp/~ammem_9ici::

Juanita Garcia, San Angelo, Texas, interviewed February 18, 1938 by Ruby Mosley

“George Hay (a present banker with Central National Bank) leased Monroe's ranch on the Pecos River, he gave little more money and gave me the cook job on the ranch, we make $150.00 per month. That's bad place to live, wild people, kill people, take money, take valuables, anything mean. I got scare plenty time no sleep on the night, work all day, make sick on the head.

We make a little save on the ranch money, put up little business, make hot tamales, enchilada and pecan candy. Pecans all time free, we make wholesale, retail and peddle Mexican foods.

Me husband make pretty good artist with the hide from cow and a thread call zephyr. The ranchmen bring the hide, my husband make what he tell like ropes, girths, blacksnakes, bridles and harness of plenty kinds. Me husband make the hide to leather then to merchandise. Everbody say he make the best leather man in Texas.

When me husband die ranch men come tell me good man gone. They no like for him to die, he make many things no man make. Ranchmen all time buy from me, they leave order me fill for Mexican supper. They tell me good things, me work hard, make good business.

"Me no citizen de Unita Estatus (of United States), no have same like the citizen, no get pension, no have money but $1.70 per week to make live, good people of San Angelo City give to me. Me father, me family, me husband give life for this good country, me work all life here but no get nothing but good talk and $1.70 per week. Me tell Mexicans if live here, get citizenship papers, make better to live."



Located in Student Public under New Deal Mexican photos

www.theblogofrecord.com/category/economic-crisis/

www.weareca.org/.../WWI-1940s/mexicans_2.html

Native Americans:

Native Americans during the early 1930s had among the highest malnutrition and disease rates in the United States. Earlier government policy had driven Native Americans from their tribal homelands on to reservations. The largest number of Native Americans on reservations lived in Oklahoma where Choctaws, Cherokees and Seminoles lived with more than twenty other tribes on infertile soil. About 75% of Native American children there were undernourished. Tuberculosis ravaged Indian reservations. Under the Dawes Act of 1887, an attempt was made to destroy traditional Native American culture. Boarding schools were expanded to assimilate Native American children into the white man’s culture. Children were forced to cut their long hair and were prohibited from practicing Indian culture, including speaking their native language. The government funded white church groups to train Native Americans to be good Christians and abandon what was perceived as dangerous religious ceremonies. And most importantly, the Dawes Act tried to end communal (group) ownership of land by Native Americans, and to provide them with individual land parcels. Anyone who lived on their lot of land for 25 years would be awarded U.S. citizenship. However, many speculators convinced Native Americans to sell their land. As a result, between 1887 and the 1930s Native American land holdings dropped from about 150 million acres to 50 million. A 1929 ruling by the government said landless tribes were not eligible for federal aid.

Under the new Deal, America’s policy of trying to eliminate Native American culture was reversed. The New Deal more directly benefitted Native Americans compared to African-Americans or Mexican-Americans. President Roosevelt appointed a defender of Native American rights, John Collier as Commissioner of Indian Affairs. Under Collier, a program similar to the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) employed 85,000 Native Americans. He also pushed the Public Works Administration (PWA), Works Progress Administration (WPA) and National Youth Administration (NYA) to hire Native Americans. Congress passed the Indian Reorganization Act which ended the Dawes Act. The previous bans on Native American languages and customs were revoked. Tribes were provided money to purchase new land and offered government recognition of their tribes. Federal grants also helped Native American school districts, hospitals and social welfare agencies.

Located in Student Public under New Deal Native American photos:

Photo 1: “Cactus”

Two Pima women harvesting "hasen", a sweet, pear-sized fruit from the giant Saguaro cactus, which may be eaten fresh or dried, could also be used to make syrup or wine.



Photo 2: “Cornmeal Ceremony”

A Tewa man, standing high on a cliff, arms stretched before him as he sprinkles cornmeal as an offering at the start of a day.



Photo 3: “Indian Chief”

A Klamath chief in ceremonial headdress standing on a hill overlooking a lake



Photo 4: “Hopi Art”

A Hopi woman seated on a mat while painting designs on pottery.

More Native American photos at: http://www.historyplace.com/unitedstates/curtis/index.html

Other internet sources for all groups:

Photos located at:

http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/ft3f59n5wt/

http://www.oldstatehouse.com/exhibits/virtual/hard_times/

http://www.authentichistory.com/1930-1939/index.html

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/fsowhome.html

http://www.historyplace.com/unitedstates/lange/index.html

Artwork located at:

http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/depression/artgallery.htm

http://twecht.tripod.com/grapesofwrath/artofgd.htm#Diego%20Rivera

http://www.pophistorydig.com/?p=3994 (Vanity Fair covers)

Music lyrics can be found at:

http://www.authentichistory.com/1930-1939/index.html

Ms. Nelson Kauffman TAH New Deal assignment

US History

New Deal and Great Depression: impact on different groups

Storyboard and Song

The impact of the Great Depression was felt nationwide, but the impact was more severe for certain groups. In this assignment you will analyze the effect of the Great Depression and New Deal on women, African-Americans, Mexican-Americans, and Native Americans.



Scenario: it is 1939 and FDR is running for re-election. Four different interest groups (women, African-Americans, Mexican-Americans, and Native Americans) want to produce separate 2-minute Public Service Announcements (PSA) informing the administration about their current situation and what else needs to be done to improve their position in society. You have been selected to produce a storyboard and theme music about your proposed PSA. As a member of your group what do you want to say to Franklin Delano Roosevelt and America about ensuring that your group has access to the American Dream?  

Steps:

  1. Using your textbook addendum locate important information about how your group was affected by the Great Depression and how the New Deal helped or failed to help you.

  2. With a partner select 8 photos and/or artwork that illustrates your information from the textbook addendum. Photos are located in student public and a list of internet sources for photos has been provided.

  3. Using your textbook addendum and pictures, create a storyboard (outline provided) that outlines what information and photos you plan to present in your proposed PSA. It should accurately illustrates the story of your group: Your storyboard must answer the following:

  • What is your general situation during the Great Depression? (socially, politically and economically)

  • How has the New Deal helped you? (see chart in textbook on page 664)

  • What more needs to be done to ensure that you have access to the American Dream? (is it all up to the government or are there other ways to improve your position?)

  1. Produce a theme song that will accompany your PSA. You may borrow any melody you want, but the lyrics must be original. Your song should prepare the viewer for the message of your movie.

  2. Present your song, pictures and storyboard to the class. Send the eight pictures you have selected to me by e-mail: wnelson-kauffman@mlc.crec.org. You will assess each other’s work and complete a worksheet during the presentations.

During the presentation audience: records:

Women


  1. How were women affected by the GD?

  2. How did the ND help women?

  3. What more could the government have done to help?

  4. What else could be done to help improve the situation of women? African-Americans?

African-Americans

  1. How were African-Americans affected by the GD?

  2. How did the New Deal help African-Americans?

  3. What more could the government have done to help?

  4. What else could be done to help improve the situation of African-Americans?

Mexican-Americans

  1. How were women affected by the GD?

  2. How did the ND help women?

  3. What more could the government have done to help?

  4. What else could be done to help improve the situation of women? African-Americans?

Native-Americans

  1. How were women affected by the GD?

  2. How did the ND help women?

  3. What more could the government have done to help?

  4. What else could be done to help improve the situation of women? African-Americans?

Post-presentation discussion:

  • Compare and contrast the impact of the Great Depression on women, African-Americans, Mexican-Americans and Native-Americans. Which group received the most help? The least? Why?

  • Why are some groups helped more than others? Is that still true today?

  • Are there any analogies with today’s recession and government help?

  • What responsibility does the government have to help people? Why did it not do more in the 1930s?

Resources:

Student Public: wnelson-kauffman/us history/New Deal/photos

Student Public: wnelson-kauffman/us history/New Deal/artwork

Student Public: wnelson-kauffman/us history/New Deal/photos/Native American

Photo 1: “Cactus” Two Pima women harvesting "hasen", a sweet, pear-sized fruit from the giant Saguaro cactus, which may be eaten fresh or dried, could also be used to make syrup or wine.

Photo 2: “Cornmeal Ceremony” A Tewa man, standing high on a cliff, arms stretched before him as he sprinkles cornmeal as an offering at the start of a day.

Photo 3: “Indian Chief” A Klamath chief in ceremonial headdress standing on a hill overlooking a lake

Photo 4: “Hopi Art” A Hopi woman seated on a mat while painting designs on pottery.

More Native American photos: http://www.historyplace.com/unitedstates/curtis/index.html

Other Sources:

More Photos (and information) located at:

www.weareca.org/.../WWI-1940s/mexicans_2.html



http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/ft3f59n5wt/ (Dorothea Lange collection)

http://www.oldstatehouse.com/exhibits/virtual/hard_times/

http://www.authentichistory.com/1930-1939/index.html

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/fsowhome.html

http://www.historyplace.com/unitedstates/lange/index.html

Artwork located at:

http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/depression/artgallery.htm

http://twecht.tripod.com/grapesofwrath/artofgd.htm#Diego%20Rivera

http://www.pophistorydig.com/?p=3994 (Vanity Fair covers)

Music lyrics can be found at:

http://www.authentichistory.com/1930-1939/index.html

CREC – TAH, Photo Narratives of the Great Depression

Title of Narrative/Story:


Authors:


Abstract of theme/plot/message:


Photo 1 description

Text for photo1

Any additional evidence


Photo 2 description

Text for photo2

Any additional evidence


Photo 3 description

Text for photo3

Any additional evidence


Photo 4 description

Text for photo4

Any additional evidence


Photo 5 description

Text for photo5

Any additional evidence

Photo 6 description

Text for photo6

Any additional evidence



Photo 7 description

Text for photo7

Any additional evidence


Photo 8 description

Text for photo8

Any additional evidence


Photo 9 description

Text for photo9

Any additional evidence


Photo 10 description

Text for photo10

Any additional evidence


Photo 11 description

Text for photo11

Any additional evidence

Photo 12 description

Text for photo12

Any additional evidence


Wendy Nelson Kauffman

TAH Memo: New Deal lesson

Directions: As part of our assessment requirements for the Federal TAH grant you must include the three components listed below. Please include a short memo with your lesson plan that details how you did that:

  1. use at least one specific resource from our sessions during the year (primary source, other reading, etc.)

  2. incorporate at least one pedagogical practice from our sessions during the year; and

  3. use at least one technology resource (such as a website) from our sessions either in the textbook addendum or as a resource in creating the addendum



    1. The following resources were used from the TAH seminars during the 2009-10 year. The list of websites (mostly provided by TAH seminars) is included in part 3.

  • “The Great Depression and the New Deal: a Very Short Introduction” by Eric Rauchway. Information was used from the book to write the addendum.

  • Photos from lesson on 10/17/09 will be put into an electronic folder on our schools intranet, so that students can access them for their storyboarding activity and presentation on our smartboard

  • Lyrics from “Brother, Can you Spare a Dime” will be used for students to do with storyboarding activity

  • “1934: A New Deal for Artists” will be used for students to do with storyboarding activity (includes artwork from Smithsonian American Art museum tour and seminar during the July 2010 trip to Washington). Artwork will be put into an electronic folder on our schools intranet, so that students can use them for their storyboarding activity



    1. Two pedagogical practices were used from 2009-10 sessions.

  • Listening to songs from the Great Depression and then creating your own lyrics (10/17/09)

  • Creating a storyboard from photos provided on 10/17/09



    1. Technology resources were used to acquire the original art and photos provided to us by the TAH supervisors. Technology was also used to locate more art and photos for student use, as well as to create the textbook addendum. Students will use their laptops to access their information and will use our smartboards to present their photos and song lyrics. The following is a list of websites that was used:



  • http://www.historyplace.com/unitedstates/curtis/index.html

  • http://www.ucalgary.ca/applied_history/tutor/migrations/six3.html

  • www.weareca.org/.../WWI-1940s/mexicans_2.html

  • http://www.oldstatehouse.com/exhibits/virtual/hard_times/

  • http://www.authentichistory.com/1930-1939/index.html

  • http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/fsowhome.html

  • http://www.historyplace.com/unitedstates/lange/index.html

  • http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/depression/artgallery.htm

  • http://twecht.tripod.com/grapesofwrath/artofgd.htm#Diego%20Rivera

  • http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/ft3f59n5wt/

  • http://www.pophistorydig.com/?p=3994 (Vanity Fair covers)


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