Course Title: World History



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Franklin County Community School Corporation • Franklin County High School • Brookville, Indiana

Curriculum Map

Course Title: World History

Quarter: 3

Academic Year: 2011-2012


Essential Questions for this Quarter:

1. How did European voyages of exploration lead to European empires in the Western Hemisphere? 2. What events led to the rise of absolute monarchies and the development of centralized nation-states in Europe? 3. How did Enlightenment thinkers inspire revolutionaries to push for radical changes in government and society? 4. What were the causes and effects of the French Revolution and how did the revolution lead to the Napoleonic era? 5. What technological, social, economic and cultural changes occurred as the Industrial revolution took hold? 6. What were the technological, social and economic effects of the Industrial Revolution?







Unit/Time Frame

The Age of Exploration

1 ½ Weeks

The Search for Spices

Conquest in the Americas

The Struggle for North America

The Atlantic Slave Trade

The Columbian Exchange

The Age of Absolutism

2 Weeks

Spain’s Golden Age
French Kings move toward Absolutism

Parliament’s conflict with the Tudor and Stuart Dynasties


Austria and Prussia

The Czars in Russia

The Enlightenment and the American Revolution

1 Week


Philosophy in the Age of Reason

Enlightenment Ideas Spread

Birth of the American Republic

The French Revolution and Napoleon

2 Weeks
Events leading to the Revolution

The French Revolution Unfolds

The Radical Days of the Revolution

The Age of Napoleon


The Industrial Revolution begins

1 ½ weeks

The Dawn of the Industrial Age

Great Britain takes charge in the early years of the Revolution

Social Impact of the Industrial Revolution
New Economical ideas emerge

Life in the Industrial Age

1 Week

The Industrial Revolution Spreads


The Rise of Cities

Changing attitudes and values


Arts in the Industrial Age



Standards
Content Standards

WH.3.14


WH.5.1

WH.5.2


WH.5.3

WH.5.4


WH. 9.1

WH. 9.2


WH. 9.3
Literacy Standards

9-10.RH.1

9-10.RH.2

9-10.RH.3

9-10.RH.4

9-10.RH.5

9-10.RH.6

Content Standards

WH.2.7


WH.4.13

WH.5.3


WH.6.2

WH.6.4


WH.9.1

WH.9.2


WH.9.3

WH.9.5


Literacy Standards

9-10.RH.1

9-10.RH.2

9-10.RH.3

9-10.RH.4

9-10.RH.5

9-10.RH.6

Content Standards

WH.6.1


WH.6.3

WH.6.4


WH.9.1

WH.9.2


Literacy Standards

9-10.RH.1

9-10.RH.2

9-10.RH.3

9-10.RH.4

9-10.RH.5

9-10.RH.6


Content Standards

WH.6.4


WH.8.11

WH.9.1


WH.9.2

WH.9.3


WH.9.4

WH.9.5



Literacy Standards

9-10.RH.1

9-10.RH.2

9-10.RH.3

9-10.RH.4

9-10.RH.5

9-10.RH.6

Content Standards

WH.6.6


WH.9.1

WH.9.2


WH.9.3

WH.9.4


Literacy Standards

9-10.RH.1

9-10.RH.2

9-10.RH.3

9-10.RH.4

9-10.RH.5

9-10.RH.6


Content Standards

WH.6.1


WH.6.6

WH.6.7


WH.9.1

WH.9.2


WH.9.3

WH.9.6


Literacy Standards

9-10.RH.1

9-10.RH.2

9-10.RH.3

9-10.RH.4

9-10.RH.5

9-10.RH.6


Content

How did the search for spices lead to global exploration?

How did a small number of Spanish conquistadors conquer huge Native American empires?

How did European struggles for power shape the North American continent?

How did the Atlantic slave trade shape the lives and economies of Africans and Europeans?
How did the voyages of European explorers lead to new economic systems in Europe and its colonies?

How did Philip II extend Spain’s power and help establish a golden age?

How did France become the leading power of Europe under the absolute rule of Louis XIV

How did the British Parliament assert its rights against royal claims to absolute power in the 1600s?

How did the two great empires of Austria and Prussia emerge from the Thirty Years’ War and subsequent events?

How did Peter the Great and Catherine the Great strengthen Russia and expand its territory?


What effects did enlightenment philosophers have on government and society?


As Enlightenment ideas spread across Europe, what cultural and political changes took place?

How did ideas of the Enlightenment lead to the independence and founding of the United States of America?

What led to the storming of the Bastille and therefore to the start of the French Revolution?

What political and social reforms did the National Assembly institute in the first stage of the French Revolution?

What events occurred during the radical phase of the French Revolution?

Explain Napoleon’s rise to power in Europe, his subsequent defeat and how the outcome still affects Europe today?

What events helped bring about the Industrial Revolution?


What key factors allowed Britain to lead the way in the Industrial Revolution?


What were the social effects of the Industrial Revolution?

What new ideas about economics and society were fostered as a result of the Industrial Revolution?

How did science, technology and big business promote industrial growth?

How did the Industrial revolution change life in the cities?

How did the Industrial Revolution change the old social order and long-held traditions in the Western world?

What artistic movements emerged in reaction to the Industrial revolution?




Skills

Read Text


Understand Cause and Effect
Summarize
Compare
Outline
Identify Bias
Analyze/Interpret Cartoons
Engage in Critical Thinking

Read Text


Understand Cause and Effect
Summarize
Compare
Outline
Identify Bias
Analyze/Interpret Cartoons
Engage in Critical Thinking

Read Text


Understand Cause and Effect
Summarize
Compare
Outline
Identify Bias
Analyze/Interpret Cartoons
Engage in Critical Thinking

Read Text


Understand Cause and Effect
Summarize
Compare
Outline
Identify Bias
Analyze/Interpret Cartoons
Engage in Critical Thinking

Read Text


Understand Cause and Effect
Summarize
Compare
Outline
Identify Bias
Analyze/Interpret Cartoons
Engage in Critical Thinking

Read Text


Understand Cause and Effect
Summarize
Compare
Outline
Identify Bias
Analyze/Interpret Cartoons
Engage in Critical Thinking


Assessment

Review questions

Worksheets

Tests


Quizzes

Essays


Group Projects

Review questions

Worksheets

Tests


Quizzes

Essays


Group Projects

Review questions

Worksheets

Tests


Quizzes

Essays


Group Projects

Review questions

Worksheets

Tests


Quizzes

Essays


Group Projects

Review questions

Worksheets

Tests


Quizzes

Essays


Group Projects

Review questions

Worksheets

Tests


Quizzes

Essays


Group Projects


Resources

Textbook


Film

Maps


Review Questions

Primary/Secondary

Source Document

Textbook


Film

Maps


Review Questions

Primary/Secondary

Source Document

Textbook


Film

Maps


Review Questions

Primary/Secondary

Source Document

Textbook


Film

Maps


Review Questions

Primary/Secondary

Source Document

Textbook


Film

Maps


Review Questions

Primary/Secondary

Source Document

Textbook


Film

Maps


Review Questions

Primary/Secondary

Source Document




Standard 1
Beginnings of Human Society and the Development of Cultural Hearths


Students will examine the lives of people during the beginnings of human society.

WH.1.1 Trace the approximate chronology and territorial range of early human communities, and analyze the processes that led to their development. (Geography, Sociology)

WH.1.2 Describe types of evidence and methods of investigation by which scholars have reconstructed the early history of domestication, agricultural settlement and cultural development.

WH.1.3 Describe social, cultural and economic characteristics of large agricultural settlements on the basis of evidence gathered by archaeologists.


(Geography, Sociology)

Standard 2
Ancient Civilizations: 4000 B.C./B.C.E. to 500 A.D./C.E.


Students will examine the characteristics of early civilizations, including those of North Africa, Southwest Asia, South Asia and East Asia from 4000 B.C./B.C.E. to 500 A.D./C.E.

Early Development of Western and Non-Western Civilizations

WH.2.1 Define civilization* and identify the key differences between civilizations and other forms of social organization. (Sociology)

WH.2.2 Compare causes and conditions by which civilizations developed in North Africa, Southwest Asia, South Asia and East Asia, and explain why the emergence of these civilizations was a decisive transformation in human history. (Geography, Sociology)

Example: The river valley civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt and the Indus River; Eastern civilizations of the Shang and Zhou dynasties; and the Kush kingdom of northeast Africa

WH.2.3 Differentiate hierarchies in the social structures of early civilized peoples and explain the influence of religious belief systems upon ancient governmental systems. (Sociology)

WH.2.4 Explain relationships in early civilizations between the development of state authority and the growth of aristocratic power, taxation systems and institutions of coerced labor, including slavery. (Government, Economics)

Greek Civilization

WH.2.5 Identify and explain the significance of achievements of Greeks in mathematics, science, philosophy, architecture and the arts and their impact on various peoples and places in subsequent periods of world history. (Sociology)

WH.2.6 Analyze the major events of the wars between the Persians and the Greeks, reasons why the Persians failed to conquer the Greeks, and consequences of the wars for Greek civilization.

WH.2.7 Compare and contrast the daily life, social hierarchy, culture and institutions of Athens and Sparta; describe the rivalry between Athens and Sparta; and explain the causes and consequences of the Peloponnesian War. (Geography, Government, Sociology)

WH.2.8 Describe the role of Alexander the Great in the spread of Hellenism in Southwest and South Asia, North Africa; and parts of Europe.

Roman Civilization

WH.2.9 Describe Roman Republican government and society and trace the changes that culminated in the end of the Republic and the beginning of the Roman Empire. (History, Government, Sociology)

WH.2.10 Describe Roman achievement in law and technology and explain their impact on various peoples and places in subsequent periods of world history. (Psychology, Sociology)

WH.2.11 Explain the origins of Christianity, including the lives and teachings of Jesus and Paul, and the relationships of early Christians with officials of the Roman Empire. (Sociology)

WH.2.12 Analyze the causes, conditions and consequences of the spread of Christianity throughout the Roman Empire, including the policies of Emperor Constantine the Great. (Individuals, Society and Culture)

WH.2.13 Explain the causes, conditions and consequences of the decline and fall of the western part of the Roman Empire.



* civilization: a complex culture in which large numbers of people share a number of common elements such as social structure, religion and art

Standard 3
Major Civilizations and Empires in Asia, Africa and the Americas: 1000 B.C./B.C.E. to 1500 A.D./C.E.


Students will trace the development of major civilizations and empires in different regions of Asia, Africa and the Americas from 1000 B.C./B.C.E. to 1500 A.D./C.E.

Asia

WH.3.1 Trace the development and major achievements of civilization in India with particular emphasis on the rise and fall of the Maurya Empire, the “golden period” of the Gupta Empire, and the reign of Emperor Ashoka. (Government)

WH.3.2 Examine, interpret and compare the main ideas of Hinduism and Buddhism and explain their influence on civilization in India. (Psychology, Sociology)

WH.3.3 Explain how Buddhism spread and influenced peoples and their cultures throughout South Asia, Central Asia and East Asia. (Psychology, Sociology)

WH.3.4 Trace the development and major achievements of Chinese and East Asian civilizations during various key dynasties, such as the Shang, Zhou, Qin, Han, Tang and Song. (Government, Sociology)

WH.3.5 Describe the life of Confucius, compare and contrast the fundamental teachings of Confucianism and Daoism (Taoism), and explain the influence of these ideas on Chinese and East Asian civilizations. (Sociology)

WH.3.6 Describe the origins and development of Japanese society and the imperial state in Japan. (Government, Sociology)

WH.3.7 Describe the life of Muhammad, fundamental teachings of Islam, and connections of Islam to Judaism and Christianity. (Psychology, Sociology)

WH.3.8 Trace the extent and consequences of Islam’s spread in Asia, the Mediterranean region and southern Europe. (Sociology)

WH.3.9 Explain how the community of Muslims became divided into Sunnis and Shiites and the long-term consequences of this division. (Psychology, Sociology)

WH.3.10 Describe and explain the rise and expansion of the Mongol empire and its consequences for Eurasian peoples, including the achievements of the great Khan in the context of Mongol society and his impact on history.

Africa

WH.3.11 Analyze and explain the rise and fall of the ancient Eastern and Southern African kingdoms of Kush and Axum, Abyssinia, and Zimbabwe.

WH.3.12 Describe the rise and fall of the ancient kingdom of Ghana and explain how it became Africa’s first large empire.

WH.3.13 Explain the rise, development and decline of Mali and Songhai.

WH.3.14 Analyze and explain the origins and development of the slave trade in Africa and its connections to Arabic peoples of North Africa and Southwest Asia and to Western European peoples. (Sociology)

The Americas

WH.3.15 Identify the origins and explain the importance of farming in the development of pre-Columbian societies and civilizations in various regions of the Americas. (Geography, Sociology)

WH.3.16 Compare and contrast the Maya, Aztec and Inca civilizations in terms of their arts, religion, sciences, economy, social hierarchy, government, armed forces and imperial expansion.

Standard 4 — Medieval Europe to the Rise and Development of Western Civilization: 500 to 1650

Students will examine the political, economic, social and cultural development of Europe, which influenced the rise of Western Civilization, particularly the Renaissance and Reformation from 500 to 1650.

WH.4.1 Describe the impact of Christian monasteries and convents on Europe, and explain how Christianity and classical Greco-Roman civilization influenced Europe after the collapse of the Roman Empire. (Sociology)

WH.4.2 Describe the impact on Western Europe of the collapse of the Roman Empire.

WH.4.3 Describe the rise and achievements of Charlemagne and the Empire of the Franks.

WH.4.4 Explain how the idea of Christendom influenced the development of cultural unity in Europe. (Sociology)

WH.4.5 Describe how technological improvements in agriculture, the growth of towns, the creation of guilds, and the development of banking during the Middle Ages, as well as the institutions of feudalism and the manorial system influenced European civilization. (Economics, Government, Sociology)

WH.4.6 Analyze and compare the success of the Roman and Orthodox churches in spreading the Christian religion and civilization to peoples of Northern and Eastern Europe. (Sociology)

WH.4.7 Explain the Great Schism of 1054 and the development of Eastern and Western branches of Christianity. (Sociology)

WH.4.8 Explain the causes of the Crusades and their consequences for Europe and Southwest Asia, including the growth in power of the monarchies in Europe. (Government, Sociology)

WH.4.9 Describe the rise, achievements, decline and demise of the Byzantine Empire; the relationships of Byzantine and Western Civilizations; the conquest of Constantinople by the Turks in 1453; and the impact on European peoples living in the Turkish (Ottoman) Empire. (Government, Sociology)

WH.4.10 Trace the origins and developments of the Northern Renaissance* and the Italian Renaissance. Explain Renaissance diffusion throughout Western Europe and its impact on peoples and places associated with western civilization.

WH.4.11 Describe the main themes and achievements of the Protestant Reformation, including its impact on science, technology and the arts. (Sociology)

WH.4.12 Analyze the factors that led to the rise and spread of the Protestant Reformation as well as the reaction of the Catholic Church. Discuss the consequences of these actions on the development of western civilization. (Sociology)

WH.4.13 Explain the causes, events and consequences of wars associated with the Protestant Reformation, which culminated with the Thirty Years War, 1618 to 1648. (Economics, Government)



* Northern Renaissance: the Renaissance in Northern Europe outside of Italy

Standard 5
Worldwide Exploration, Conquest and Colonization: 1450 to 1750


Students will examine the causes, events, and consequences of worldwide exploration, conquest and colonization from 1450 to 1750.

WH.5.1 Explain the causes and conditions of worldwide voyages of exploration and discovery by expeditions from China, Portugal, Spain, France, England and the Netherlands.

WH.5.2 Explain the origins, developments and consequences of the transatlantic slave trade between Africa and the Americas. Analyze and compare the ways that slavery and other forms of coerced labor or social bondage were practiced in East Africa, West Africa, Southwest Asia, Europe and the Americas from 1450 to 1750. (Economics, Geography, Sociology)

WH.5.3 Explain the origins, developments, main events and consequences of European overseas expansion through conquest and colonization in Africa, Asia and the Americas. (Economics, Geography, Sociology)

WH.5.4 Identify major technological innovations in shipbuilding, navigation, and naval warfare, and explain how these technological advances were related to voyages of exploration, conquest and colonization. (Economics, Geography)

Standard 6
Scientific, Political, Cultural and Industrial Revolutions: 1500 to 1900


Students will examine the causes, events and global consequences of the scientific, political, cultural and industrial revolutions that originated in Western Europe and profoundly influenced the world from 1500 to 1900.

WH.6.1 Examine how the Scientific Revolution, as well as technological changes and new forms of energy, brought about massive social, economic, and cultural change. (Economics, Government, Psychology, Sociology)

WH.6.2 Trace the origins and consequences of the English Civil War on the government and society of England, and explain the significance of the Glorious Revolution of 1688 for the development of government and liberty in England and its colonies in North America. (Economics, Government)

WH.6.3 Explain the concept of “the Enlightenment” in European history and describe its impact upon political thought and government in Europe, North America and other regions of the world. (Economics, Government)

WH.6.4 Compare and contrast the causes and events of the American and French Revolutions of the late eighteenth century and explain their consequences for the growth of liberty, equality and democracy in Europe, the Americas and other parts of the world. (Government, Sociology)

WH.6.5 Describe the causes, events and outcomes of the Latin American independence movements of the nineteenth century. (Government, Sociology)



Example: Mexican Independence movement (1810-1821), Simon Bolivar (1808-1809) and Brazil’s independence from Portugal (1889)

WH.6.6 Describe the causes and conditions of the Industrial Revolution in England, Europe and the United States, and explain the global consequences. (Economics, Geography, Sociology)



Example: Change in agricultural practices and increases in food supplies, Karl Marx and the Communist Manifesto, the rise of Communism and Socialism, the growth of cities, rise in population, class distinction, Das Kapital, and utopian movements

WH.6.7 Analyze and evaluate the influence of Christianity, the Enlightenment and democratic revolutions and ideas in various regions of the world. (Sociology)



Standard 7
Global Imperialism: 1500 to the Present


Students will examine the origins, major events and consequences of worldwide imperialism from 1500 to the present.

WH.7.1 Discuss the rise of nation-states* and nationalism in Europe, North America and Asia and explain the causes, main events and global consequences of imperialism from these areas. (Government)



Example: Unification of German states (1871), France and Japan

WH.7.2 Analyze the causes and consequences of European imperialism upon the indigenous peoples of Africa, Asia and Oceania.(Government, Sociology)



Example: The partition of Africa and the economic and political domination of China and India

WH.7.3 Analyze Japanese responses to challenges by Western imperial powers and the impact of these responses on Japan’s subsequent development as an industrial, military and imperial power. (Economics, Government, Sociology)



* nation-state: a defined area or territory, the government that rules it and the culture of its people

Standard 8
An Era of Global Conflicts, Challenges, Controversies and Changes: 1900 to the Present


Students will analyze and explain trends and events of global significance, such as world wars, international controversies and challenges, and cross-cultural changes that have connected once-separated regions into an incipient global community.

WH.8.1 Trace and explain the causes, major events and global consequences of World War I.

WH.8.2 Explain causes of the February and October Revolutions of 1917 in Russia, their effects on the outcome of World War I, and the success of the Bolsheviks (Communists) in their establishment of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. (Economics, Government, Sociology)

WH.8.3 Compare the totalitarian ideologies, institutions and leaders of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, Germany and Italy in the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s. (Government, Sociology)



Example: Describe the ideas and governmental structures and the influences of Lenin, Stalin, Hitler and Mussolini.

WH.8.4 Identify and analyze the causes, events and consequences of World War II.

WH.8.5 Explain the origins and purposes of international alliances in the context of World War I and World War II.

Example: The Allied nations (United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union) and Axis nations (Germany, Italy and Japan) during World War II

WH.8.6 Explain the causes and consequences of the Cold War. (Government, Psychology, Sociology)

WH.8.7 Identify new post-war nations in South and Southeast Asia and Africa that were created from former colonies, and describe the reconfiguration of the African continent. (Government)

Example: Singapore, Indonesia, Nigeria and Senegal

WH.8.8 Describe and explain the origins of the modern state of Israel and the reactions of the peoples and states in southwest Asia. (Government)

WH.8.9 Describe ethnic or nationalistic conflicts and violence in various parts of the world, including Southeastern Europe, Southwest and Central Asia, and sub-Saharan Africa. (Sociology)

Example: Vietnam War, North and South Korea, the Taliban in Afghanistan, Palestinian and Israeli conflicts, Kenya, and Uganda

WH.8.10 Describe and analyze the global expansion of democracy since the 1970s and the successes or failures of democratic reform movements in challenging authoritarian or despotic regimes in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe and Latin America.



Example: Breakup of the Soviet Union, reunification of Germany and Argentina’s change from military to civilian rule

WH.8.11 Identify contemporary international organizations. Describe why each was established and assess their success, consequences for citizen and the role of particular countries in achieving the goals of each. (Economics, Government)



Example: The United Nations (UN), European Union (EU), Doctors Without Borders, The Red Crescent, Oxford Committee for Famine Relief, The International Red Cross and The International Monetary Fund


Standard 9


Historical Thinking

Students will conduct historical research that incorporates information literacy skills such as forming appropriate research questions; evaluating information by determining accuracy, relevance and comprehensiveness; interpreting a variety of primary and secondary sources; and presenting their findings with documentation.

Chronological Thinking, Analysis and Interpretation, Research, Issues-Analysis and Decision-Making

WH.9.1 Identify patterns of historical change and duration and construct a representation that illustrates continuity and change.



Example: Using maps, databases, flow charts, concept webs, Venn diagrams and other graphic organizers, identify and describe patterns of change regarding the development of civilization in the eastern hemisphere, the river valley civilizations and Mesopotamia.

WH.9.2 Locate and analyze primary sources and secondary sources related to an event or issue of the past.



Example: Use electronic and print sources, such as autobiographies, diaries, maps, photographs, letters, newspapers and government documents, to compare accounts and perspectives related to differences in European and Chinese culture during the time of Marco Polo.

WH.9.3 Investigate and interpret multiple causation in analyzing historical actions, and analyze cause-and-effect relationships.



Example: The cause of World War I, Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, the development of the United Nations and the end of apartheid in South Africa

WH.9.4 Explain issues and problems of the past by analyzing the interests and viewpoints of those involved.



Example: The Boxer Rebellion in China and the Crusades

WH.9.5 Use technology in the process of conducting historical research and in the presentation of the products of historical research and current events.



Example: Use digital archives to research and make presentations about the changes in Europe after World War II.

WH.9.6 Formulate and present a position or course of action on an issue by examining the underlying factors contributing to that issue.

9-10.RH.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to

such features as the date and origin of the information.

9-10.RH.2 Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an

accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.

9-10.RH.3 Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused

later ones or simply preceded them.


Craft and Structure

9-10.RH.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary

describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social studies.

9-10.RH.5 Analyze how a text uses structure to emphasize key points or advance an explanation or

analysis.

9-10.RH.6 Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics,

including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

9-10.RH.7 Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (e.g., charts, research data) with qualitative

analysis in print or digital text.



9-10.RH.8 Assess the extent to which the reasoning and evidence in a text support the author’s claims.

9-10.RH.9 Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources.
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

9-10.RH.10 By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 9-10 text

complexity band independently and proficiently.



Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies 9-10 WH
The standards below begin at grade 9 and define what students should understand and be able to do by the end of grade 10. The CCR anchor standards and high school standards in literacy work in tandem to define college and career readiness expectations – the former providing broad standards, the latter providing additional specificity.
Text Types and Purposes

9-10.WH.1 Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.

a. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form and in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.

c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from or supports the argument presented.



9-10.WH.2 Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events.

a. Introduce a topic and organize ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

b. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

c. Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic and convey a style appropriate to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.

e. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or

explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).



9-10.WH.3 Note: Students’ narrative skills continue to grow in these grades. The Standards require that

students be able to incorporate narrative elements effectively into arguments and informative/explanatory texts. In history/social studies, students must be able to incorporate narrative accounts into their analyses of individuals or events of historical import.
Production and Distribution of Writing

9-10.WH.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are

appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.



9-10.WH.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a

new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and

audience.

9-10.WH.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared

writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to

display information flexibly and dynamically.
Research to Build and Present Knowledge

9-10.WH.7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a

self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate;

synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under

investigation.



9-10.WH.8 Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using

advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research

question; integrate information into the text selectivity to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding

plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.



9-10.WH.9 Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
Range of Writing

9-10.WH.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter

time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes,



and audiences.


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