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DESE Model Curriculum

GRADE LEVEL/UNIT TITLE: 9-12/Same Threads, Different Stories Course Code: English 2




COURSE INTRODUCTION:
How does your community impact your story? How do you impact your community and understand it? In tenth grade English, students will closely read and evaluate a variety of fiction and nonfiction texts in order to answer these overarching, essential questions. As they read, they will also use process writing, free writing, and journaling to explore their connections to fiction and nonfiction literature while also learning to ask the big questions necessary to "grasp a relationship between local concerns and universal questions." Through civil discourse (collaboration, discussions about literature and responses to reading), students will deepen their understanding of how to function in a community. Throughout the year, students will compose a variety of formal and informal writings demonstrating their competency in effective communication.




UNIT DESCRIPTION:

In this unit students will explore the meaning of community in its various forms. They will evaluate the values of their own communities and the impact that growing up in their communities has had on them by first reading and evaluating the impact of community on the characters in one of the books students choose to read.

Diverse Learners

Strategies for meeting the needs of all learners including gifted students, English Language Learners (ELL) and students with disabilities can be found at http://www.dese.mo.gov/divimprove/curriculum/UD-Model-Curriculum-Introduction-Sheet.pdf. Resources based on the Universal Design for Learning principles are available at www.cast.org.



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SUGGESTED UNIT TIMELINE: 10 weeks

CLASS PERIOD (min.): 50 min

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:

1. How do the beliefs, values and history of your community impact your beliefs, values and future?




ESSENTIAL MEASURABLE LEARNING OBJECTIVES

CCSS LEARNING GOALS (Anchor Standards/Clusters)

CROSSWALK TO STANDARDS

GLEs/CLEs

PS

CCSS

OTHER

DOK

  1. Students will be able to make inferences from a set of given facts gleaned from newspaper articles and other historical documents or descriptions in a given in a literary text.

R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

R.10 Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

R.1.H.E2.a

R.1.H.E2.d

R.1.H.E2.e

R.1.H.E2.f

R.2.C.E2.a

R.2.C.E2.b

R.2.C.E2.c

R.2.C.E2.d

R.1.D.E2.a

R.1.D.E2.b





RL.9-10.1

RL.9-10.2

RL.9-10.3

RL.9-10.6

RL.9-10.10

RI.9-10.7




3

  1. Students will be able to analyze the effect of setting on characters.

R.3 Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.


R.2.C.E2.b

R.2.C.E2.d




RL.9-10.5




3

  1. Students will be able to evaluate the impact of historical events on their own communities as well as the effect on characters and ideas in a novel.

R.3 Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

R.5 Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.



R.1.H.E2.d

R.1.H.E2.e

R.3.C.E1.a

R.3.C.E1.b

R.3.C.E1.c

R.3.C.E1.d

R.3.C.E1.e

R.3.C.E1.f

R.3.C.E1.g

R.1.H.E2.a

R.1.H.E2.f





RI.9-10.1

RI.9-10.2

RI.9-10.7




4

  1. Students will compose a variety of writings including an effective, reflective essay about the bond between the individual and community for them personally and for a character from their books, several blog posts about literature and a script for a community research project.

W.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

W.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

W.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.analysis, reflection, and research.




W.2.C.E2.a

W.2.A.E2.a

W.2.A.E2.b

W.2.B.E2.a

W.2.B.E2.b

W.2.B.E2.c

W.2.B.E2.d

W.2.C.E2.b

W.2.C.E2.c

W.2.C.E2.d

W.2.D.E2.a

W.1.A.E2

W.3.A.E2.a

W.3.A.E2.b

W.3.A.E2.c

W.3.A.E2.d

W.3.A.E2.e

W.2.C.E2.e

W.2.E.E2.a

W.2.E.E2.b




W.9-10.1

W.9-10.2 W.9-10.4

W.9-10.5 W.9-10.7 W.9-10.9 W.9-10.10

L.9-10.1.a L.9-10.1.b

L.9-10.2.a

L.9-10.2.b

L.9-10.2.c




4

5. Students will conduct research using primary and secondary resources.

W.7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

W.8 Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.

W.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support


W.3.A.E2.a




W.9-10.8

W.9-10.9.a

W.9-10.9.b




3

ASSESSMENT DESCRIPTIONS*: (Write a brief overview here. Identify Formative/Summative. Actual assessments will be accessed by a link to PDF file or Word doc. )

Formative Assessments: Where I’m From Poems for student and one for a character from their book

Character Sheets

Students create a community map of “spaces” for themselves and for main protagonist of novel. ( Spaces are places with which you have a relationship. ) Student maps are spaces where they feel they can be themselves, spaces which have had an impact on them.



4 Socratic seminars (prep includes annotating texts looking for meaningful passages, Cornell Notes small group discussions/large group discussions, and exit passes on actual discussions) with Post-Discussion Reflection

Venn Diagram/Process Writing: Compare history textbook selections and presentation in fiction books or memoirs

Weekly blog posts about literary passage annotations

Summative Assessments:

Know Community Projects

Topics include: the Famous and the Infamous, Famous Places/Important Places, Ghost Stories, Buried Treasures, Local Festivals and their Origins, Civil War Impact, Documented Walking Tours, Great Food, Flora and Fauna of the Community ,Graveyards, Historical Events

Reflection Essay: What are the values, history, and beliefs that you will take with you from your community? If you plan on staying in the community, what are the values, beliefs, and history that you will teach to your children? How did you learn these values? How did reading this book impact these values and beliefs?

*Attach Unit Summative Assessment, including Scoring Guides/Scoring Keys/Alignment Codes and DOK Levels for all items. Label each assessment according to the unit descriptions above ( i.e., Grade Level/Course Title/Course Code, Unit #.)

Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES (research-based): (Teacher Methods)

5

  1. Literature Circles To Kill a Mockingbird, 12 Mighty Orphans, A Lesson Before Dying, Lay That Trumpet in Our Hands, Native Son, Their Eyes Were Watching God, The Immortal Henrietta Lacks, I Will Plant You a Lilac Tree, or The Book Thief. (Books were chosen based on how the values of the communities impact the characters.) Use Amazon reviews/descriptions to help students choose their books.

3, 4

  1. Arrange a writing marathon in the community where you take students to historical places in the community, explain briefly the historical significance and have students freewrite in small groups about this place and share. Do this at least 3-4 times. At end of marathon gather all students together to share best section of what they’ve written with entire group. A marathon instruction sheet that could be shared with students is included in this unit.




1

  1. Collect the history textbook articles to be read by each literature circle group for the time periods discussed in their books.

1, 3, 5

  1. Provide yearbooks, newspapers, articles and any historical articles or information pertaining to the local community (Could also appeal to members of the community in the weeks before to write letters to students about their community, how long they’ve lived there, most memorable moments, historical moments, etc.). You could also Invite members of the community in as guest speakers to discuss the background of the community.







Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES: (What Students Do)

2

  1. List your communities, discuss the meaning of community, draw a map of your favorite community, freewrite stories about your relationship with certain spaces. Create community maps with stories for you and for one character in your book.

3

  1. Complete character sheets that help students find the physical traits of the characters as well as the personality traits of the characters.

2, 3, 4

  1. Freewriting/process writing about news articles/yearbooks-discussing their perceptions of their community before and after reading the articles. Have students discuss the values of their community.

1, 2

  1. Write “Where I’m From” poems for selves and for main character

1, 4

  1. Marking annotations of interesting passages while reading. Blog about one of these weekly.




1

  1. Socratic Seminar Preparation

Five of these seminars will be presented with themes of:

How does the idea of courage fit into our current society? How does it impact the personality of the community? (“If” and “In Search of Courage” )

Are there social injustices worth fighting even if you know you’ll lose? Why or why not? How should we fight them or tolerate them. (“Scottsboro, Too, Is Worth It’s Song” and “Strange Fruit”)

How are the values of a community formed? (“Back on the Block”)

How do the ideas of compassion and empathy impact our culture? (“Sympathy” and “A Poison Tree”)

Write Post-Discussion Reflections.


UNIT RESOURCES: (include internet addresses for linking)

Jolley, Susan Arpajian. “Integrating Poetry and To Kill a Mockingbird.” English Journal. Nov. 2002. Pp34-41.



2011 Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Page of


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