Course Guide Fall 2014



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Social Studies 30-1&2
Course Guide Fall 2014
Instructor: Mr. M. Robertson email: michael.robertson@ghsd75.ca Room: FH 232

Website: pcabunker.weebly.com Twitter: @Unparliamentary

If you have any questions about assignments when you are working on them outside of school hours please feel free to email me with your questions or go to the “Questions, Concerns, or Minor Aneurisms” page on the website. I will attempt to respond to your questions quickly. This email address is not to be used for any other reason than questions about the course and the assignments in it.

Course Goals

Students will explore the origins and complexities of ideologies and examine multiple perspectives regarding the principles of classical and modern liberalism. An analysis of various political and economic systems will allow students to assess the viability of the principles of liberalism. Developing understandings of the roles and responsibilities associated with citizenship will encourage students to respond to emergent global issues.


Required Texts:

Social 30-1: Perspectives on Ideologies Social 30-2: Understanding of Ideologies


Required Reading: In addition to the course materials and the textbook you will be required to sign up for a Twitter account and follow @ Unparliamentary for current events that apply to the course. You should also be in the Word so as to be prepared to defend your worldview.
­­­­Key Issue Key Outcome

To what extent should we embrace an Students will understand, assess and respond ideology? to the complexities of ideologies.
Related Issues General Outcomes
1. To what extent should ideology be the Students will explore the relationship foundation of identity? (Sept 2 - Sept 18) between identity and ideology.



2. To what extent is resistance to liberalism Students will assess impacts of, and justified? (Sept 19 – Nov 3) reactions to, principles of liberalism.
3. To what extent are the principles of Students will assess the extent to liberalism viable? (Nov 4 – Dec 11) which the principles of liberalism are

viable in a contemporary world.


4. To what extent should my actions as Students will assess their rights, roles

a citizen be shaped by an ideology? and responsibilities as citizens.

(Dec 11 – Jan 13)



REVIEW – between exams

General Rules

There is one major rule in my classroom: RESPECT. Everyone in this class has the right to be respected and the responsibility to respect others. This includes everything from respecting each other’s opinions during discussions, to coming on time, to respecting everyone’s right to learn. Students expect the instructor to treat them with respect, showing up prepared and treating each individual student with dignity, and the instructor expects the same respect in return.


When a student is late (on occasion) he/she will knock politely and wait to be admitted at the first opportune time by the instructor. Students are expected to attend class on time and be prepared to participate (ex: textbooks, notebooks, pens, pencils, etc.). An absence due to illness or family emergency on the day of an exam will require that the student write the exam in the first class period after their return to school or as arranged with the teacher. An unexcused absence on the day of an exam will result in a loss of rewrite capability for that exam (only a single exam opportunity shall be offered to that student). Students are responsible for getting any homework and/or notes that they have missed.
The use of CD/MP3/Cassette tape players during work time will be allowed at the discretion of the instructor, as well as having food, so long as neither disrupt the students around you nor prevents you from accomplishing your work, and these privileges may be taken away if you feel the need to be disrespectful. Cell phones will be confiscated if used intentionally by the student, if inadvertently they must declare it or have it confiscated.
Evaluation
Expect to do homework for this class and if you are lucky enough not to have some then you should be reviewing the material that we have already covered! If the assignment has been written on computer please try to retain a computer file of it in case of loss or mishap.


  1. Projects 20%

  2. Minor Assignments 5%

  3. Position Papers & Unit Exams 25%

  4. Diploma Exam 50%

100%

Exams
Exams will generally be made up of multiple-choice, paragraph, and essay questions. You should be watching the news regularly because sometimes the topics are pulled from current affairs and applied to the concepts covered in the course. Please also monitor the twitter feed for news applicable to the course. You may retake an exam (or part of an exam) once if you complete all of the homework BUT you must take the second mark.
Exams and Assignments will be held and/or due on the following dates

  1. Identity and Ideology -------------------------------- September 17

    1. Unit 1 Essay September 26

    2. Unit 1 Project October 3




  1. Origin and Growth of Liberalism -------------------------------- November 3

    1. Antz and Economics October 17

    2. Unit 2 Essay October 31

    3. Unit 2 Project November 7

    4. Apocalyptic Literature November 28

  2. Viability of Liberalism -------------------------------- December 15

    1. Political Party Pres. November 17

    2. Rights and Freedoms December 5

    3. Unit 3 Essay December 12

    4. Unit 3 Project December 19

  3. Ideology and Citizenship -------------------------------- Practice Diploma TBA

    1. Battlefield Earth Pres. December 17

    2. Minority Rights Pres. January 7

The Social Studies 30 Diploma Part A (Written) on January 14!

The Social Studies 30 Diploma Part B (Multiple Choice) on January 21!
Materials Needed for Class


  1. 3” D-Ring Three-ring binder with loose-leaf paper

  2. Markers, pencil crayons and/or crayons for projects

  3. Pens and pencils – blue, black, or red unless otherwise approved

  4. Textbooks are to be brought to class every day unless otherwise specified by the instructor


Assignments
All minor assignments and position papers are due the last day of the week in which they were assigned unless otherwise specified by the instructor.


  1. Projects – Have to do one for each of the first three units and two for the last unit – the subject(s) will be provided at the beginning of each unit and the project will be due the week of the unit test.




  1. Position Papers – Several of these will be handed in for marks as part of each unit exam (minimum 1 per unit) and the criteria will be based upon the attached rubric.




  1. Minor Assignments – A few of these will be done in units 2 and 3 in order to enhance understanding of the topics at hand.




  1. Homework - Students will not be required to hand in daily homework or quizzes, however, if a student wishes to redo a unit exam, paper, or major project they will be required to prove that they are up to date in their homework and assignments.


Late Assignments
All assignments must be completed in order to qualify for a mark in the course. Any missing assignments indicate that the course is incomplete and the student will not receive a grade until the instructor has determined the course to be completed. Any late assignments, barring an excused absence or extenuating circumstances (which have a note from a parent or guardian attached to them), shall be subject to an academic penalty.
Assignments are due on the Friday, by midnight, of the week in which they were assigned unless otherwise stated by the instructor. Any assignment handed in by email after school hours will be marked without feedback. If a student misses the due date they will be given the period of one weekend (immediately following the due date) to correct any missing and/or incomplete assignments, after which they are subject to an automatic deduction of 20% from the grade they ultimately achieved on the assignment. A monthly progress report shall be issued to the student to ensure accuracy.
All due dates for this course are posted in the Course Outline and the Website (pcabunker.weebly.com).
Appeals and Re-writes

  • Assignments may be appealed and marked a second time by the teacher after a conference with said teacher.

    • If such an assignment remains contested by the student, another teacher, within the Humanities Department may be contracted to assess the assignment and consult with the original teacher and student.

  • Students may re-write an exam once, at a time determined in consultation with the teacher, prior to the last month of the semester in question within the bounds of the following:

    • Students may not rewrite an exam if they missed the original date of said exam, unless the student had previously communicated an excused absence for the date in question.

    • Students are required to schedule time for the rewrite, as well as consultative tutorials with the teacher, at least one day in advance of rewriting the exam.

    • Students will take the mark that is earned on the rewritten exam, regardless of what was earned on the previous attempt of said exam, as the student is required to do consultation tutorials with the teacher before embarking on the rewrite (and thus should have acquired more knowledge).





Social 30-1

Perspectives on IDEOLOGY
Part 1: Identity and Ideology
Introduction
1. Thinking About Identity and Ideologies
2. Ideologies of Individualism and Collectivism

Homework Questions:

Pg 47 #1-3

Pg 60 #1, 2, 4
Part 2: The Origin and Growth of Liberalism
3. Uncovering 19th-century Liberalism
4. Responding to Classical Liberalism
5. Twentieth Century Rejections of Liberalism
6. The Evolution of Modern Liberalism
7. Challenges to Liberalism Related to Foreign Policy
8. Contemporary Challenges to Liberalism

Part 3: The Viability of Liberalism
9. Imposing Liberalism
10. Political Challenges to Liberalism
11. Complexities of Liberalism in Practice
12. The Viability of Contemporary Liberalism


Part 4: Ideology and Citizenship
13. Reflecting on Worldview, Ideology, and Citizenship
14. Reflecting on Ideology, Action, and Citizenship
Social 30-2

Understandings of IDEOLOGY
Part 1: Identity and Ideology
1. Exploring Different Ways of Thinking
2. Exploring Individualism
3. Exploring Collectivism

Homework Questions:

Pg 39 #3 & 4


Part 2: The Origin and Growth of Liberalism
4. Exploring the Roots of Liberalism
5. Responding to Classical Liberalism
6. Reaction to Classical Liberalism
7. Reaction of Classical Liberalism
8. Ideologies in Conflict after World War II
9. Imposing Liberalism
10. Challenging Liberalism


Part 3: The Viability of Liberalism
11. Exploring Democracy in Theory and Practice
12. Economic Equality
13. Exploring Government Choices and Liberalism
14. Reflecting on the Viability of Liberalism

Part 4: Ideology and Citizenship
15. Reflecting on Ideology and Citizenship
16. Taking Action for Change


Unit 1 Lesson Plans
Day 1 - Introduction PPt.

  • Textbook sign-out

  • Course Outline

  • Project Booklet

  • Multiple Intelligence Survey


Day 2 – Multiple Intelligence polling

  • Ideology Quiz

  • R-L Overheads

  • Newspapers (for examples)


Day 3 – Political Philosophers PPt

  • Collectivism vs. Individualism PPt and activity


Day 4 – CL - Project work
Day 5 - Freedom and Democracy PPt

  • Media PPt

  • SS #16-4 (or 5)


Day 6 – Balancing Collectivism, Individualism, and Common Good discussion

  • Discovering the Influence of Ideologies discussion

  • Collectivist vs. Individualist Newspaper Examples


Day 7 – Various Music clips (as examples)

  • Stupid Laws PPt

  • Dictatorships PPt


Day 8 – Cowconomics

  • Economics PPt

  • Fiddler on the Roof

  • SS #62-2 (Wendy’s Commercial)


Day 9 – SS #21-1 (7 Days as a Homeless Man)

  • SS #10-5 (Selling Organs)


Day 10 – CL – Project work

  • Distribute assignments for The Dark Knight


Day 11- The Dark Knight
Day 12 – Unit Test
Day 13 – The Dark Knight

Unit 2 Lesson Plans
Day 1 – Finish Part II of Exam


Day 2 – Aboriginal and Enlightenment Thinkers PPt

  • Changing Patterns in the Arts PPt

  • Industrial Revolution PPt


Day 3 – Factory Simulation

  • SS #5-4 Modern Times

  • Industrial Revolution PPt


Day 4 – Industrial Revolution PPt
Day 5 – Market Economy PPt

  • $5 market economy simulation

  • Mixed Economy PPt


Day 6 – - Mixed Economy PPt

  • SS#13-9 (add 8 if there is time) Cost of Cool

  • Music examples?


Day 7 – Review and mark multiple choice section of Unit 1 Exam (5 questions minimum)

  • Communism PPt


Day 8 – Communism PPt

  • Ants and the Ants and Economics Assignment


Day 9 – Ants and the Ants and Economics Assignment
Day 10 – Apocalyptic Literature

  • Generals Die in Bed excerpt read to class and PPt that goes with it

  • WWI PPt


Day 12- Fly Boys clips (scenes 24/25 and 29/30)

  • WWI PPt


Day 13 – WWI PPt

  • Passchendaele clips (lead-up and final battle)


Day 16 – Interwar combustion simulation

  • Intrerwar PPt


Day 17 – Fascism PPt
Day 18 – Nazi PPt

  • The Nazis: A Warning from History clips


Day 19 to 21 – Schindler’s List

Day 22 – WWII PPt

  • Lil Hitler

  • WWII DVDs Battle of Britain (scene 5 to 45 min)


Day 23 – WWII PPt

  • WWII – Battle for Russia (20 to 34 min)

  • Enemy at the Gates (scene 2 to 3)

  • SS#26-1 FDR (extra if there is time)


Day 24 – WW II PPt

  • Pearl Harbor clips


Day 25 – WW II PPt

  • Saving Private Ryan clips

  • Crusade in the Pacific clips


Day 27 – Unit Test

Social 30 Unit 3 Lesson Plans
Day 1 – Review and mark multiple choice section of Unit 2 Exam (5 questions minimum)

  • Characteristics of a Democracy PPt

  • Hand out permission forms for Shake Hands with the Devil


Day 2 – Election of a President and PM PPt

  • SS#24-20, 27


Day 3 – Canadian Government PPt

  • SS#60-2 – AF – PM’s Office behind closed doors

  • SS#60-4 – RMR Speaking the parliamentarian’s language

  • SS#11-3 - 19:30 – RMR VOTE

  • SS#64-8 – RMR Rant – students need to vote


Day 4 – US Government PPt

  • Man of the Year


Day 5 – Political Parties in a Democracy PPt

  • SS#71-6 – Kids as politicians

  • SS#64B-16 – Fringe Parties

  • SS#64B-13 – SMP Voting


Day 6– Political Parties Assignment (Computer Lab)
Day 8– Political Parties Presentation
Day 9 – Rights and Responsibilities PPt
Day 10 – USSR Politics PPt
Day11 – Russian Federation PPt

  • SS#16-6, 2

  • SS#25-4

  • SS#24-3, 6, 10


Day 12 – Middle East PPt

  • SS#2-5 Hamas – Behind the Mask – can put in the Alternative Futures if short on time


Day 13 – Iran PPt and Political Systems Sheet
Day 14- United Nations PPt

  • Cold War Maps Assignment


Day 15 – United States Economy PPt
Day 16 – Trade Liberalization PPt

  • SS#44-7 – Fall of the Berlin Wall


Day 17 – End of the Cold War Activity and Presentations
Day 18 – Africa Case Studies PPt

  • Shake Hands With the Devil


Day 19 – Shake Hands With the Devil
Day 20 – Mini Lesson on Writing Essays

  • Computer Lab Essay Work


Day 21-24 – Alternative Futures PPt

  • SS#13-10 to 15

  • SS#7-27

  • SS#15-2

  • SS#52B-1

  • SS#15-3

  • SS#23-11

  • SS#11-4,7


Day 25 – Start work on Battlefield Earth Presentations (U4)
Day 26 – Unit Test

Unit 4 Lesson Plans
Day 1 – Review and mark multiple choice section of Unit 3 Exam

  • Hand out and explain the next two projects (Battlefield Earth and Minority Rights)

  • Computer Lab


Day 2 – Computer Lab
Day 4 – Battlefield Earth Presentations
Day 5– Computer Lab
Day 7 – Minority Rights Presentations
Day 10 – Practice Diploma (Written) in the Computer Lab

  • NOTE: If you score higher on this essay than on any of the unit tests you may substitute it for that unit test essay


Day 11 – Peer Review of Essays
Day 12 (Jan 14) – Diploma Part A (Written)

  • Watch V for Vendetta and 180


Day 13 – Final Class PPt and multimedia sources
Day 14 – Practice Diploma (M.C.) in class

  • NOTE: If you score higher on this essay than on any of the unit tests you may substitute it for that unit test essay


Jan 21 – PART B DIPLOMA - MC

Written Response Format



for Assignment II (Position Paper)
Keys to success:


  • Effective interpretation of source throughout the paper (this is key!)

  • Clearly established position (even a “middle” one)

  • Thorough development of arguments and relating them to issue and source

  • Linking evidence to arguments and to the source



Paragraph One – Introduction

  1. Paraphrase the statement.

  2. Identify and define the ideological perspective of the speaker.

  3. Develop the relevant arguments that would support the ideological perspective of the speaker.

  4. Rephrase the source.

  5. Identify and define the ideological perspective of the other side.

  6. Develop the relevant arguments that would support the ideological perspective of the other side.

  7. Write a relevant issue question pertaining to the source that begins : To what extent should one embrace the ideological perspective of…

  8. Answer the issue question in a succinct, clear thesis statement: Upon exploration, it is clear that………


Paragraph Two – Source Analysis

  • Identify and explain the perspective expressed in the source (2-3 sentences) and its basic relationship to ideology.

  • Explain the context of the source (2-3 sentences) – perspective, time period, circumstances.

    • Who made this statement?

    • Where was this individual from and what time period did s/he live?

    • What events was this individual responding to?

    • What contributions did this individual make to the development and application of ideology in our modern world?

    • What aspects of liberalism are being addressed in this statement? How do you know?

    • How would this source respond to the question, to what extent is resistance to liberalism justified? Offer support.

    • Which other historical and contemporary figures would agree with this source?

    • Which other historical and contemporary figures would disagree with this source?

  • Prepare a cost-benefit analysis of the perspectives presented in the source:

    • What are the benefits of pursuing the perspective of the source?

    • What are the costs of pursuing the perspective of the source?

  • Summarize various opinions (positions) on the issue question.

  • Tieback to the position you are taking and indicate why your position is better than the alternatives. The evidence shows…

The Body Options—Development of Position


Paragraph

If you mostly agree with source…

If you mostly disagree with source…

If you are arguing the middle ground or balanced approach

Three

  • Identify and Explain




  • Background




  • Case Study Evidence




  • Tieback




Summarize the position that you are arguing against.
Here is a guide to how you might structure this paragraph:
Clearly identify and explain the position being presented in this paragraph.
Identify and explain 1 or 2 background points that support this position…these should be conceptual in nature. Arguments should relate to the larger issue question being presented.
Identify and explain a clear case study to illustrate each argument. Evidence should be specific and relate directly to the conceptual arguments being made.
Throughout this paragraph, ensure that you present this position in a way that shows the strength of your position. To do this you will employ a “yes, but” form of argumentation. As in, “Proponents of this position would argue ____ however, ____
Tieback: This case study demonstrates that…


Summarize the position that you are arguing against.
Here is a guide to how you might structure this paragraph:
Clearly identify and explain the position being presented in this paragraph.
Identify and explain 1 or 2 background points that support this position…these should be conceptual in nature. Arguments should relate to the larger issue question being presented.
Identify and explain a clear case study to illustrate each argument. Evidence should be specific and relate directly to the conceptual arguments being made.
Throughout this paragraph, ensure that you present this position in a way that shows the strength of your position. To do this you will employ a “yes, but” form of argumentation. As in, “Proponents of this position would argue ____ however, ____”
Tieback: This case study demonstrates that…


Summarize one extreme position that you are arguing against which the source would also argue against.
Here is a guide to how you might structure this paragraph:
Clearly identify and explain the position being presented in this paragraph.
Identify and explain 1 or 2 background points that support this position…these should be conceptual in nature. Arguments should relate to the larger issue question being presented.
Identify and explain a clear case study to illustrate each argument. Evidence should be specific and relate directly to the conceptual arguments being made.
Throughout this paragraph, ensure that you present this position in a way that shows the strength of your position. To do this you will employ a “yes, but” form of argumentation. As in, “Proponents of this position would argue ____ however, ____”
Tieback: This case study demonstrates that…





Paragraph

If you mostly agree with source…

If you mostly disagree with source…

If you are arguing the middle ground or balanced approach

Four

  • Identify and Explain




  • Background




  • Case Study Evidence




  • Tieback




This is a summary of the position you are agreeing with and defending.
Here is a guide to how you might structure this paragraph:
Refer to the source. Clearly identify and explain how the source relates to your position and the issue question.
Identify and explain 1 or 2 background points that support your position…these should be conceptual in nature. Arguments should relate to the larger issue question being presented.
Identify and explain a clear case study to illustrate each argument. Evidence should be specific and relate directly to the conceptual arguments being made.
Tieback: Considering the above example…


This is a summary of the position you are agreeing with and defending.
Here is a guide to how you might structure this paragraph:
Refer to the source. Clearly identify and explain how the source relates to your position and the issue question.
Identify and explain 1 or 2 background points that support your position…these should be conceptual in nature. Arguments should relate to the larger issue question being presented.
Identify and explain a clear case study to illustrate each argument. Evidence should be specific and relate directly to the conceptual arguments being made.
Tieback: Considering the above example….

Summarize the other one extreme position that you are arguing against.
Here is a guide to how you might structure this paragraph:
In the first few sentences, clearly identify and explain how the source would relate to the issue question and position being presented in this paragraph.
Clearly identify the position being presented in this paragraph.
Identify and explain 1 or 2 background points that support this position…these should be conceptual in nature. Arguments should relate to the larger issue question being presented.
Identify and explain a clear case study to illustrate each argument. Evidence should be specific and relate directly to the conceptual arguments being made.
Throughout this paragraph, ensure that you present this position in a way that shows the strength of your position. To do this you will employ a “yes, but” form of argumentation. As in, “Proponents of this position would argue ____ however, ____
Tieback: Considering the above example…





Paragraph

If you mostly agree with source…

If you mostly disagree with source…

If you are arguing the middle ground or balanced approach

Five

  • Identify and Explain




  • Background




  • Case Study Evidence




  • Tieback




OPTION A: Build your argument further with addition support
OR
OPTION B: Use this opportunity to tear down the opposition one more time.

_____________________________

Here is a guide to how you might pursue OPTION A:
Refer to the source. Identify and explain how the source relates to your position and the issue question regarding these new arguments.
Identify and explain 1 or 2 new background points that support your position…these should be conceptual in nature. Arguments should relate to the larger issue question being presented.
Identify and explain a clear case study to illustrate each argument. Evidence should be specific and relate directly to the conceptual arguments being made.
Tieback: With this in mind…

____________________________


Here is a guide to how you might pursue OPTION B:
Clearly identify and explain the position being presented in this paragraph.
Identify and explain 1 or 2 background points that support this position…these should be conceptual in nature. Arguments should relate to the larger issue question being presented.
Identify and explain a clear case study to illustrate each argument. Evidence should be specific and relate directly to the conceptual arguments being made.
Throughout this paragraph, ensure that you present this position in a way that shows the strength of your position. To do this you will employ a “yes, but” form of argumentation. As in, “Proponents of this position would argue ____ however, ____
Tieback: The evidence shows…


OPTION A: Build your argument further with addition support
OR
OPTION B: Use this opportunity to tear down the opposition one more time.

_____________________________

Here is a guide to how you might pursue OPTION A:
Refer to the source. Identify and explain how the source relates to your position and the issue question regarding these new arguments.
Identify and explain 1 or 2 new background points that support your position…these should be conceptual in nature. Arguments should relate to the larger issue question being presented.
Identify and explain a clear case study to illustrate each argument. Evidence should be specific and relate directly to the conceptual arguments being made.
Tieback: With this in mind…

____________________________


Here is a guide to how you might pursue OPTION B:
Clearly identify and explain the position being presented in this paragraph.
Identify and explain 1 or 2 background points that support this position…these should be conceptual in nature. Arguments should relate to the larger issue question being presented.
Identify and explain a clear case study to illustrate each argument. Evidence should be specific and relate directly to the conceptual arguments being made.
Throughout this paragraph, ensure that you present this position in a way that shows the strength of your position. To do this you will employ a “yes, but” form of argumentation. As in, “Proponents of this position would argue ____ however, ____
Tieback: The evidence shows…


This is a summary of the position you are taking and defending.
Here is a guide to how you might structure this paragraph:
In a few sentences, explain why following either of the extremes is not preferable. Establish a clear middle position.
Refer to the source. Identify and explain how the source relates to your position and the issue question.
Identify and explain 1 or 2 background points that support your position…these should be conceptual in nature. Arguments should relate to the larger issue question being presented.
Identify and explain a clear case study to illustrate each argument. Evidence should be specific and relate directly to the conceptual arguments being made.
THE KEY HERE IS TO SHOW HOW THE MIDDLE POSITION ACKNOWLEDGES THE GOALS OF THE TWO EXTREMES BUT AVOIDS THE PROBLEMS THOSE EXTREME POSITIONS CAN LEAD TO.
Tieback: With this in mind…



Conclusion – wrap up

  • Use this section to briefly re-summarize the source, issue question, positions, and why your position is preferable.

Top Ten Mistakes Made When Writing an Essay


  1. Capitalization – used at the beginning of sentences and for the names of people, places, and organizations.




  1. Punctuation – periods to end a sentence, commas to delay or interrupt, exclamations to emphasize or communicate excitement, question marks when asking a question, quotations when you quote something, and colons and semi colons to insert lists of things.




  1. Proper essay format – refer to essay writing strategy guide.




  1. Defend your statements with examples from the literature, song, or film.




  1. Connect your thesis to the essay’s body.




  1. Double negatives – you will not have no fun with them at all.




  1. Numbers – use words until you get past the number ten, then you can use numbers.




  1. Do not address the reader – you, us, etc . . . and avoid using first person unless writing a personal essay – we both know they are your ideas so just state them and avoid “I”, “me”, and “myself” Sam I Am.




  1. Avoid contractions – you couldn’t, wouldn’t, and shouldn’t use them.




  1. And avoid starting a sentence with “and” if at all possible.




Social Studies 30-1&2 Course Guide


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