Course Form I. Summary of Proposed Changes



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Course Form







I. Summary of Proposed Changes

Dept / Program

History

Prefix and Course #

HSTA 327

Course Title

 The Rise and Fall of Atlantic World Slavery

Short Title (max. 26 characters incl. spaces)

Atlantic World Slavery

Summarize the change(s) proposed

Would like the designated course number above.

II. Endorsement/Approvals
Complete the form and obtain signatures before submitting to Faculty Senate Office

Please type / print name

Signature

Date

Requestor:

Christopher Pastore




5/1/12

Phone/ email :

406-243-2369

chris.pastore@umontana.edu









Program Chair/Director:

John Eglin







Other affected programs



















Dean:

Christopher Comer







Are other departments/programs affected by this modification because of

(a) required courses incl. prerequisites or corequisites,


(b) perceived overlap in content areas

(c) cross-listing of coursework



Please obtain signature(s) from the Chair/Director of any such department/ program (above) before submission

III: To Add a New Course Syllabus and assessment information is required (paste syllabus into section V or attach). Course should have internal coherence and clear focus.


Common Course Numbering Review (Department Chair Must Initial):
Does an equivalent course exist elsewhere in the MUS? Check all relevant disciplines if course is interdisciplinary. (http://www.mus.edu/Qtools/CCN/ccn_default.asp)

YES

NO

X


If YES: Do the proposed abbreviation, number, title and credits align with existing course(s)? Please indicate equivalent course/campus. ß




If NO: Course may be unique, but is subject to common course review. Be sure to include learning outcomes on syllabus or paste below. The course number may be changed at the system level.

See attached syllabus

Exact entry to appear in the next catalog (Specify course abbreviation, level, number, title, credits, repeatability (if applicable), frequency of offering, prerequisites, and a brief description.) ß

U 327 The Rise and Fall of Atlantic World Slavery 3 cr. (AM) Offered alternate years.

This course will examine the development and demise of slavery in the early modern Atlantic world, from the late fifteenth to the late nineteenth centuries. Specifically, we will explore the ways the transatlantic slave trade forged economic and cultural connections between Europe, Africa, and the Americas, thereby causing immeasurable suffering while conditioning conceptions of race, reshaping politics and religion, and transforming the ecology of nearly a third of the globe.



Justification: How does the course fit with the existing curriculum? Why is it needed?

This is the only course that examines slavery from an Atlantic world perspective, and it is the only course that begins with the rise of the plantation complex in the fifteenth century.

Are there curricular adjustments to accommodate teaching this course?      

No.

Complete for UG courses (UG courses should be assigned a 400 number).
Describe graduate increment - see procedure 301.30 http://umt.edu/facultysenate/committees/grad_council/procedures/default.aspx





Complete for Co-convented courses
Companion course number, title, and description (include syllabus of companion course in section V)
See procedure 301.20 http://umt.edu/facultysenate/committees/grad_council/procedures/default.aspx.




New fees and changes to existing fees are only approved once each biennium by the Board of Regents.  The coordination of fee submission is administered by Administration and Finance.   Fees may be requested only for courses meeting specific conditions according to Policy 940.12.1 http://mus.edu/borpol/bor900/940-12-1.pdf .   Please indicate whether this course will be considered for a fee.

YES

NO

X


If YES, what is the proposed amount of the fee?




Justification:

IV. To Delete or Change an Existing Course – check X all that apply


Deletion




Title




Course Number Change




From:




Level U, UG, G
Co-convened




From:




To:




To:




Description Change




Repeatability




Change in Credits




From:




Cross Listing (primary program initiates form)




To:




Prerequisites




Is there a fee associated with the course?




1. Current course information at it appears in catalog (http://www.umt.edu/catalog) ß

2. Full and exact entry (as proposed) ß







3. If cross-listed course: secondary program & course number




4. If co-convened course: companion course number, title, and description
(include syllabus of companion course in section V) See procedure 301.20 http://umt.edu/facultysenate/committees/grad_council/procedures/default.aspx.





5. Is this a course with MUS Common Course Numbering? http://www.mus.edu/Qtools/CCN/ccn_default.asp

If yes, please explain below whether this change will eliminate the course’s common course status.



YES

NO













6. Graduate increment if level of course is changed to UG. Reference procedure 301.30:
http://umt.edu/facultysenate/committees/
grad_council/procedures/default.aspx


(syllabus required in section V)

Have you reviewed the graduate increment guidelines? Please check (X) space provided.




7. Other programs affected by the change




8. Justification for proposed change



V. Syllabus/Assessment Information (must include learning outcomes)


Required for new courses and course change from U to UG. Paste syllabus in field below or attach and send digital copy with form.ß




VI Department Summary (Required if several forms are submitted) In a separate document list course number, title, and proposed change for all proposals.

VII Copies and Electronic Submission. After approval, submit original, one copy, summary of proposals and electronic file to the Faculty Senate Office, UH 221, camie.foos@mso.umt.edu.

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY



UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA
Semester:

Class Hours:

Location:

Instructor: Christopher Pastore

Office: Liberal Arts 261

Email: chris.pastore@umontana.edu

Phone: 406-243-2369

Office Hours:
HSTA 327

The Rise and Fall of Atlantic World Slavery
This course will examine the development and demise of slavery in the early modern Atlantic world, from the late fifteenth to the late nineteenth centuries. Specifically, we will explore the ways the transatlantic slave trade forged economic and cultural connections between Europe, Africa, and the Americas. In the name of empire and the pursuit of profit, millions of humans moved and were moved around the Atlantic basin, fomenting conflict while conditioning conceptions of race, reshaping politics and religion, and transforming the ecology of nearly a third of the globe. Acknowledging that slavery was never monolithic, we will explore the nature of slavery in Africa and among the major European powers and how it changed over time. Finally, we will examine the ways the Age of Revolutions and the Atlantic world movement of ideas fueled the abolition of the British slave trade in 1808.
Required Books (available at the university bookstore):


  • Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano. (New York: Penguin Classics, 2003).




  • Ira Berlin, Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America (Cambridge: The Belknap Press of Harvard University, 1998).




  • John Thornton, Africa and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World, 1400-1800 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1992).




  • Marcus Rediker, The Slave Ship: A Human History (New York: Penguin, 2007)




  • Jon F. Sensbach, Rebecca’s Revival: Creating Black Christianity in the Atlantic World (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2005).




  • Philip Curtin, The Rise and Fall of the Plantation Complex: Essays in American History (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990).




  • Sue Peabody and Keila Grinberg, eds. Slavery, Freedom, and the Law in the Atlantic World: A Brief History with Documents (Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2007)


Course Goals:

  • To develop a sense of chronology about the past (i.e. to become familiar with important people, episodes, and eras in Atlantic world history).

  • To understand the various sources historians have used to construct the history of Atlantic world slavery.

  • To understand the physical and psychosocial complexities of slavery.

  • To gain an understanding of how historians work—their questions, methods, and perspectives—and how interpretations of slavery have changed over time.

  • To develop your own skills in writing, reading, and reasoning.


Reading:

The reading should be done before each class, and you should come to class prepared for discussion with questions in mind. Any readings not in one of the above books will be posted to Moodle.


Writing:

  1. Four 300-word responses to the assigned reading, to be handed in at the end of four pre-determined classes. (I will circulate a sign-up sheet.). This is to help you focus your thoughts and contribute to the discussion. The reports should be 2 to 4 paragraphs in length. You should aim to make an analytical point about the text under discussion, not to describe its contents. Find an “angle” on the reading and develop it briefly. I will give you the opportunity to draft your first report. (I will provide feedback and allow you to resubmit an edited copy.) All subsequent reports will be simply submitted for a grade.


NOTE: On the day you hand in each of these papers, you will give a brief, informal presentation to the class, explaining the analytical point you discussed. These presentations will be factored into your participation grade.


  1. You will write a 10-page research paper on any topic related to Atlantic world slavery. I will provide more information on these in class.


Exams:

There will also be a mid-term exam for which you should expect to write 10 pages.


Attendance and Participation:

This class will be a mix of lecture and discussion, so I expect you to be active participants. I reserve to right to call on people to jump start discussion. Discussion is an important part of learning. In discussion you learn to make a good case for yourself, and you open yourself to alternate ideas and challenges. Because it is so important, a student who fails to participate will receive, at best, 12 out of 20 points.


Excuses:

A missed exam or late paper can be made up only if you make prior arrangements with me, or if you have a note from a doctor, your dean, or residence life. I reserve the right to check on the validity of any note. You must complete all assignments to pass the course.


Grades:

Reading Response 1 5%

Reading Response 2 10%

Reading Response 3 10%

Reading Response 4 10%

Mid-term take-home exam 20%

Final paper 20%

Final paper presentation 5%

Attendance/Participation 20%
Incompletes:

I am strongly opposed to giving incompletes except in emergencies.



Students with Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability and wish to discuss reasonable accommodations for this course, contact me privately to discuss the specific modifications you wish to request. Please be advised I may request that you provide a letter from Disability Services for Students verifying your right to reasonable modifications. If you have not yet contacted Disability Services, located in Lommasson Center 154, please do so in order to verify your disability and to coordinate your reasonable modifications. For more information, visit the Disability Services website at http://life.umt.edu/dss or call (406) 243-2243.


Academic Honesty:

Honesty is a core value of this class. It is required that you conduct yourself with integrity. This means that each member will adhere to the principles and rules of the University and pursue academic work in a straightforward and truthful manner, free from deception or fraud. Any attempt to deviate from these principles will be construed as acts of academic dishonesty and will be dealt with according to the rules of due process outlined in the University of Montana student conduct code, a copy of which is available at http://life.umt.edu/vpsa/student_conduct.php.


Assignment Schedule:
Week 1: Defining the Atlantic
Tuesday, January 24

Thursday, January 26




  • Introductions


Week 2: Ancient Origins and Iberian Forays into Africa and America
Tuesday, January 31
Reading:


  • Alison Games, “Atlantic History: Definitions, Challenges, and Opportunities,” American Historical Review 111, no. 3 (June 2006): 641-757.

  • Peter Kolchin, “Slaveries in the Atlantic World Introduction: Variations of Slavery in the Atlantic World,” William and Mary Quarterly 59, no. 3 (July 2002): 551-554.

  • David Brion Davis, “The Ancient Foundations of Modern Slavery,” in Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World (New York: Oxford, 2006), 27-47.

Thursday, February 2


Reading:

  • James Lockhart, “Encomienda and Hacienda: The Evolution of the Great Estate in the Spanish Indies,” The Hispanic American Historical Review 49, no. 3 (August 1969): 411-429.

  • Bartolomé de las Casas, selections from “A Brief Account of the Destruction of the Indies”

  • Philip Curtin, The Rise and Fall of the Plantation Complex, Chapters 1-5.


Week 3: Iberian Forays Continued and African Slavery
Tuesday, February 7
Reading:

  • John Thornton, Africa and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World, Introduction, Chapter 1 “The Birth of an Atlantic World” and Chapter 2 “The Development of Commerce Between Europeans and Africans,” pp. 13-71.

  • Section on “Portuguese Atlantic and Brazil” in Part I of Peabody and Grinberg, Slavery, Freedom, and the Law + primary sources TBA.

Thursday, February 9


Reading:

  • Thornton, Chapter 3 “Slavery and African Social Structure” and Chapter 4 “The Process of Enslavement and the Slave Trade”

  • Olaudah Equiano, Interesting Narrative, Chapter 1-2.

  • Vincent Carretta, “Olaudah Equiano or Gustavus Vassa? New Light on an Eighteenth Century Question of Identity,” Slavery and Abolition 20, no. 3 (1999): 96-105.



Week 4: The Middle Passage
Tuesday, February 14
Reading:

  • Marcus Reddiker, The Slave Ship: A Human History, Introduction + Chapter 1, 2, and 4

Thursday, February 16


Reading:

  • Marcus Reddiker, The Slave Ship: A Human History, chapters 5-9.



Week 5: Slavery on the North American Continent
Tuesday, February 21
Reading:

  • Ira Berlin, Many Thousands Gone, Prologue through Chapter 4, pp. 1-92.

Thursday, February 23


Reading:

  • Ira Berlin, Many Thousands Gone, Chapters 5-8, pp. 93-215.



Week 6: The Indian Slave Trade, Caribbean, and Environmental Change
Tuesday February 28
Reading:

  • Allan Gallay, “Carolina, The Westo, and the Trade in Indian Slaves, 1670-1685,” in The Indian Slave Trade: The Rise of the English Empire in the American South, 1670-1717 (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2002), 40-69.

  • T. Silver, A New Face on the Countryside: Indians, Colonists, and Slaves in the South Atlantic Forests, 1500-1800 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990), 104-138, 186-198.

Thursday, March 1


Reading:

  • Curtin, The Rise and Fall of the Plantation Complex, Chapters 6-8, pp. 73-110.

  • Richard S. Dunn, Sugar and Slaves: The Rise of the Planter Class in the English West Indies, 1624-1713 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2000), Chapter 6 “Sugar,” pp. 188-223.

  • David Watts, The West Indies. Patterns of Development, Culture and Environmental Change since 1492 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990), 382-405.



Week 7: MIDTERM EXAM
Tuesday, March 6


  • MIDTERM EXAM REVIEW




  • I will pass out the midterm on this day. It will be due in class on Tuesday March 13.

Thursday, March 8




  • Individual Research Paper Meetings. We will meet in my office (LA 261). I will circulate a sign-up sheet.



WEEK 8: Creolization
Tuesday, March 13

Reading:

  • Randy J. Sparks, “Two Princes of Calabar: An Atlantic Odyssey from Slavery to Freedom,” William and Mary Quarterly 59, no. 3 (July 2002): 555-584.

  • Olaudah Equiano, Interesting Narrative, Chapter 3-7.

Thursday, March 15



Reading:

  • W. Jeffrey Bolster, Chapter 3, “The Way of a Ship” in Black Jacks: African American Seamen in the Age of Sail (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1997), 68-101.

  • Olaudah Equiano, Interesting Narrative, Chapter 8-11



Week 9: Gender, Religion, and the Dutch Atlantic
Tuesday, March 20
Reading:

  • John Thornton, Africa and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World, Chapters 8 and 9, pp. 206-271.

Thursday, March 22


Reading:


  • Jon F. Sensbach, Rebecca’s Revival: Creating Black Christianity in the Atlantic World (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2005), 1-100.



Week 10: Gender, Religion, and the Dutch Atlantic (continued)
Tuesday, March 27
Reading:


  • Sensbach, Rebecca’s Revival, 100-161

Thursday, March 29


Reading:

  • Sensbach, Rebecca’s Revival 162-247.



Week 11: SPRING BREAK: NO CLASS

WEEK 12: Slavery and the American Revolution
Tuesday, April 10
Reading:


  • Berlin, Many Thousands Gone, pp. 219-324.

  • Benjamin Rush, An Address to the Inhabitants of the British Settlements in America, upon Slave-Keeping (1773)

  • Thomas Paine, “African Slavery in America,” The Pennsylvania Journal and the Weekly Advertiser, March 8, 1775.

Thursday, April 12

Reading:

  • “Slavery and Freedom in the British Atlantic and the United States” in Part I of Slavery, Freedom, and the Law in the Atlantic World. Primary Sources TBA.

  • Lord Dunmore’s Proclamation, Virginia 1775.



In class: Simon Schama Rough Crossings (BBC Video in class)

Week 13: The Haitian Revolution and the End of the Slave Trade

Tuesday, April 17



Reading:

  • Curtin, The Rise and Fall of the Plantation Complex, Chapters 11-12, pp. 144-172.

  • “The French Atlantic and the Haitian Revolution” in Slavery, Freedom, and the Law in the Atlantic World + primary sources TBA.

Thursday, April 19

Reading:

  • Seymour Drescher, “The Ending of the Slave Trade and the Evolution of European Scientific Racism” Social Science History 14, no. 3 (Autumn, 1990): 415-450.

  • Equiano, Chapter 12

  • Marcus Rediker, The Slave Ship, Chapter 10, “The Long Voyage of the Slave Ship Brooks,” pp. 308-342.



Week 14: Spanish America and Brazil
Tuesday, April 24
Reading:

  • Slavery, Freedom, and the Law in the Atlantic World. Primary Sources TBA.

Thursday, April 26


FINAL PAPER PRESENTATIONS:

1. _____________________

2. _____________________

3. _____________________

4.______________________
Final day of class: course recap

____________________________________________________________________________



Week 15: Final Presentations
Tuesday, May 1
FINAL PAPER PRESENTATIONS

1. _____________________

2. _____________________

3. _____________________

4.______________________
Thursday, May 3
FINAL PAPER PRESENTATIONS

1. _____________________

2. _____________________

3. _____________________

4.______________________

FINAL PAPER, due Thursday May 10, at 12 noon.

Revised 8-23-11








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