Coordinated program review report of findings



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Edward M. Kennedy Academy for

Health Careers Charter School

COORDINATED PROGRAM REVIEW

REPORT OF FINDINGS
English Learner Education
Dates of Onsite Visit: January 13-15, 2014

Date of Draft Report: August 14, 2014

Date of Final Report: September 12, 2014
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Onsite Team Members:

Lynn A. Summerill, Chair. Program Quality Achievement

Timothy Gallagher

Nathan Lemmon







Mitchell D. Chester, Ed. D.

Commissioner of Elementary and Secondary Education









MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION

COORDINATED PROGRAM REVIEW REPORT
Edward M. Kennedy Academy for Health Careers Charter School

SCOPE OF COORDINATED PROGRAM REVIEWS 3

4

REPORT INTRODUCTION 7



ENGLISH LEARNER EDUCATION 11

MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION

COORDINATED PROGRAM REVIEW REPORT
Edward M. Kennedy Academy for Health Careers Charter School



SCOPE OF COORDINATED PROGRAM REVIEWS

As one part of its accountability system, the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education oversees local compliance with education requirements through the Coordinated Program Review (CPR). All reviews cover selected requirements in the following areas:

Special Education (SE)


  • selected requirements from the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA-2004); the federal regulations promulgated under that Act at 34 CFR Part 300; M.G.L. c. 71B, and the Massachusetts Board of Education’s Special Education regulations (603 CMR 28.00), as amended effective March 1, 2007. All districts participating in the 2013-2014 monitoring cycle conducted self-assessments across all criteria in the Web-based Monitoring System (WBMS).

Civil Rights Methods of Administration and Other General Education Requirements (CR)



  • selected federal civil rights requirements, including requirements under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; the Equal Educational Opportunities Act of 1974; Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972; Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, together with selected state requirements under M.G.L. c. 76, Section 5 and M.G.L. c. 269 §§ 17 through 19.

  • selected requirements from the Massachusetts Board of Education’s Physical Restraint regulations (603 CMR 46.00).

  • selected requirements from the Massachusetts Board of Education’s Student Learning Time regulations (603 CMR 27.00).

  • various requirements under other federal and state laws. All districts participating in the 2013-2014 CPR monitoring cycle conducted self-assessments across all criteria in the Web-based Monitoring System (WBMS).

English Learner Education (ELE) in Public Schools



  • selected requirements from M.G.L. c. 71A, the state law that governs the provision of education to limited English proficient students, and 603 CMR 14.00, as well as the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, Title III and Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. During the 2013-2014 school year, all districts that enroll limited English proficient students will be reviewed using a combination of updated standards and a self-assessment instrument overseen by the Department’s

RETELL (Rethinking Equity and Teaching for English Language Learners) initiative.
Some reviews also cover selected requirements in:
Career/Vocational Technical Education (CVTE)

  • career/vocational technical education programs under the federal Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act of 1998 and M.G.L. c. 74.

Districts providing Title I services participate in Title I program monitoring during the same year they are scheduled for a Coordinated Program Review. Details regarding the Title I program monitoring process are available at: http://www.doe.mass.edu/titlei/monitoring.



COORDINATED PROGRAM REVIEW ELEMENTS
Team: Depending upon the size of a school district and the number of programs to be reviewed, a team of two to eight Department staff members conducts onsite activities over two to five days in a school district or charter school.
Timing: Each school district and charter school in the Commonwealth is scheduled to receive a Coordinated Program Review every six years and a mid-cycle special education follow-up visit three years after the Coordinated Program Review; about seventy-seven school districts and charter schools are scheduled for Coordinated Program Reviews in 2013-2014 SY, all districts participated in the Web-based Monitoring System (WBMS). The Department’s 2013-2014 schedule of Coordinated Program Reviews is posted on the Department’s web site at <>.  The statewide six-year Program Review cycle, including the Department’s Mid-cycle follow-up monitoring schedule, is posted at <>.

Criteria: The Program Review criteria for each WBMS review, begins with the district/school conducting a self-assessment across all fifty-two current special education criteria. Program Quality Assurance through its Desk Review procedures examines the district/school’s self-assessment submission and determines which criteria will be followed–up on through onsite verification activities. For more details, please see the section on The Web-based Approach to Special Education Monitoring at the beginning of the School District Information Package for Special Education.
The requirements selected for review in all of the regulated programs are those that are most closely aligned with the goals of the Massachusetts Education Reform Act of 1993 to promote student achievement and high standards for all students.

WBMS Methods: Methods used in reviewing special education programs include:
Self-Assessment Phase:

  • District/school review of special education documentation for required elements including document uploads. Upon completion of this portion of the district/school’s self-assessment, it is submitted to the Department for review.

  • District/school review of a sample of special education student records selected across grade levels, disability categories and level of need. Additional requirements for the appropriate selection of the student record sample can be found in Appendix II: Student Record Review Procedures of the School District Information Package for Special Education.

Upon completion of this portion of the district/school’s self-assessment, it is submitted to

the Department for review.

On-site Verification Phase: Includes activities selected from the following;


  • Interviews of administrative, instructional, and support staff consistent with those criteria selected for onsite verification.

  • Interviews of parent advisory council (PAC) representatives and other telephone interviews, as requested, by other parents or members of the general public.

  • Review of student records for special education: The Department may select a sample of student records from those the district reviewed as part of its self-assessment, as well as records chosen by the Department from the special education student roster. The onsite team will conduct this review, using standard Department procedures, to determine whether procedural and programmatic requirements have been implemented. 

  • Surveys of parents of students with disabilities: Parents of students with disabilities whose files are selected for the record review, as well as the parents of an equal number of other students with disabilities, are sent a survey that solicits information regarding their experiences with the district’s implementation of special education programs, related services, and procedural requirements.

  • Observation of classrooms and other facilities: The onsite team visits a sample of classrooms and other school facilities used in the delivery of programs and services to determine general levels of compliance with program requirements.



Methods for all other programs in the Coordinated Program Review:


  • Review of documentation about the operation of the charter school or district's programs.




  • Interviews of administrative, instructional, and support staff across all grade levels.




  • Telephone interviews as requested by other parents or members of the general public.




  • Review of student records for English learner education and career/vocational technical education:  The Department selects a representative sample of student records for the onsite team to review, using standard Department procedures, to determine whether procedural and programmatic requirements have been implemented. 




  • Surveys of parents of English learners whose files are selected for the record review are sent a survey of their experiences with the district's implementation of the English learner education program and related procedural requirements.




  • Observation of classrooms and other facilities: The onsite team visits a sample of classrooms and other school facilities used in the delivery of programs and services to determine general levels of compliance with program requirements.


Report: Preparation:

At the end of the onsite visit, the onsite team will hold an informal exit meeting to summarize its comments for the superintendent or charter school leader and anyone else he or she chooses. Within approximately 45 business days of the onsite visit, the onsite chairperson will forward to the superintendent or charter school leader (and collaborative director where applicable) a Draft Report containing comments from the Program Review. The Draft Report

comments for special education are provided to the district/school on-line through the Web-based Monitoring System (WBMS). These comments will, once the district has had a chance to respond, form the basis for any findings by the Department. The district (and collaborative) will then have 10 business days to review the report for accuracy before the publication of a Final Report with ratings and findings (see below). The Final Report will be issued within approximately 60 business days of the conclusion of the onsite visit and posted on the Department’s website at .
Content of Final Report:

Ratings. In the Final Report, the onsite team gives a rating for each compliance criterion it has reviewed; those ratings are “Commendable,” “Implemented,” “Implementation in Progress,” “Partially Implemented,” “Not Implemented,” and “Not Applicable.” “Implementation in Progress,” used for criteria containing new or updated legal requirements, means that the district has implemented any old requirements contained in the criterion and is training staff or beginning to implement the new requirements in such a way that the onsite team anticipates that the new requirements will be implemented by the end of the school year.
Findings. The onsite team includes a finding in the Final Report for each criterion that it rates “Commendable,” “Partially Implemented,” “Not Implemented,” or “Implementation in Progress,” explaining the basis for the rating. It may also include findings for other related criteria.
Response: Where criteria are found “Partially Implemented” or “Not Implemented”, the district or charter school must propose corrective action to bring those areas into compliance with the relevant statutes and regulations.  This corrective action plan (CAP) will be due to the Department within 20 business days after the issuance of the Final Report and is subject to the Department’s review and approval. Department staff will offer districts and charter schools technical assistance on the content and requirements for developing an approvable CAP.
Department staff will also provide ongoing technical assistance as the school or district is implementing the approved corrective action plan. School districts and charter schools must demonstrate effective resolution of noncompliance identified by the Department as soon as possible but in no case later than one year from the issuance of the Department’s Final Program Review Report.


INTRODUCTION TO THE FINAL REPORT

A three-member Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education team visited Edward M. Kennedy Academy for Health Careers Charter School during the week of January 13, 2014to evaluate the implementation of selected criteria in the program areas of special education, civil rights and other related general education requirements, and English learner education. The team appreciated the opportunity to interview staff and parents, to observe classroom facilities and to review the programs underway in the district.


The Department is submitting the following Coordinated Program Review Report containing findings made pursuant to this onsite visit. In preparing this report, the team reviewed extensive written documentation regarding the operation of the district's programs, together with information gathered by means of the following Department program review methods:


  • Interviews of 3 administrative staff.

  • Interviews of 17 teaching and support services staff across all levels.

  • Interviews of one parent of an English Language Learner.

  • Student record reviews: Samples of 23 special education student records and 10 English learner education student records were selected by the Department. These student records were first examined by local staff, whose comments were then verified by the onsite team using standard Department record review procedures.

  • Surveys of parents of students with disabilities: Twenty-six parents of students with disabilities were sent surveys that solicited information about their experiences with the district’s implementation of special education programs, related services and procedural requirements. None of these parent surveys were returned to the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education for review.

  • Surveys of parents of ELE students: Ten parents of ELE students were sent surveys that solicited information about their experiences with the district’s implementation of English learner education programs, services, and procedural requirements. One of these parent surveys were returned to the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education for review.

  • Observation of classrooms and other facilities. A sample of four instructional classrooms, used in the delivery of programs and services was visited to examine general levels of compliance with program requirements.

The report includes findings in the program areas reviewed organized under nine components. These components are:


Component I: Assessment of Students

Component II: Student Identification and Program Placement

Component III: Parent and Community Involvement

Component IV: Curriculum and Instruction

Component V: Student Support Services

Component VI: Faculty, Staff and Administration

Component VII: Facilities

Component VIII: Program Evaluation

Component IX: Recordkeeping and Fund Use
The findings in each program area explain the “ratings,” determinations by the team about the implementation status of the criteria reviewed. The ratings indicate those criteria that were found by the team to be substantially “Implemented” or implemented in a “Commendable” manner. (Refer to the “Definition of Compliance Ratings” section of the report.) Where criteria were found to be either "Partially Implemented" or "Not Implemented," the district or charter school must propose to the Department corrective actions to bring those areas into compliance with the controlling statute or regulation. Districts are expected to incorporate the corrective action into their district and school improvement plans, including their professional development plans.

Edward M. Kennedy Academy for Health Careers Charter School

SUMMARY OF COMPLIANCE CRITERIA INCLUDED IN THIS REPORT

REQUIRING CORRECTIVE ACTION



PROGRAM AREA



PARTIALLY IMPLEMENTED


NOT IMPLEMENTED


OTHER CRITERIA REQUIRING RESPONSE


English Learner Education









NOTE THAT ALL OTHER CRITERIA REVIEWED BY THE DEPARTMENT THAT ARE NOT MENTIONED ABOVE HAVE RECEIVED AN “IMPLEMENTED” OR “NOT APPLICABLE” RATING.


DEFINITION OF COMPLIANCE RATINGS








Commendable

Any requirement or aspect of a requirement implemented in an exemplary manner significantly beyond the requirements of law or regulation.




Implemented

The requirement is substantially met in all important aspects.



Implementation in Progress

This rating is used for criteria containing new or updated legal requirements and means that the district has implemented any old requirements contained in the criterion and is training staff or beginning to implement the new requirements in such a way that the onsite team anticipates that the new requirements will be implemented by the end of the school year.





Partially Implemented

The requirement, in one or several important aspects, is not entirely met.




Not Implemented

The requirement is totally or substantially not met.




Not Applicable

The requirement does not apply to the school district or charter school.









ENGLISH LEARNER EDUCATION
LEGAL STANDARDS,

COMPLIANCE RATINGS AND

FINDINGS





CRITERION

NUMBER

ENGLISH LEARNER EDUCATION


I. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT PROGRESS



Legal Standard


ELE 1

Annual English Language Proficiency Assessment


  1. The district annually assesses the English proficiency of all ELL students.

  2. The ACCESS for ELLs is administered to ELLs annually in grades K-12 by qualified staff.



Authority: NCLB, Title I and Title III; G.L. c. 71A, § 7; 603 CMR 14.02





Rating: Implemented

District Response Required:

No




CRITERION

NUMBER

     




Legal Standard


ELE 2
MCAS




ELLs participate in the annual administration of the MCAS (Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System) exam as required and in accordance with Department guidelines.
Authority: NCLB, Title I, Title VI; G.L. c. 69, § 1I; c. 71A, § 7





Rating: Implemented

District Response Required:

No




CRITERION

NUMBER

ENGLISH LEARNER EDUCATION


II. STUDENT IDENTIFICATION AND PLACEMENT



Legal Standard


ELE 3
Initial Identification




The district uses qualified staff and appropriate procedures and assessments to identify students who are ELLs and to assess their level of English proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening.
Authority: Title VI; EEOA; G.L. c. 71A, §§ 4, 5; 603 CMR 14.02; G.L c. 76, § 5; 603 CMR 26.03





Rating: Implemented

District Response Required:

No





CRITERION

NUMBER

     




Legal Standard


ELE 4

Waiver Procedures





  1. Waivers of the requirement to be taught through sheltered English immersion instruction may be considered based on parent request, providing the parent annually visits the school and provides written informed consent. Parents must be informed of their right to apply for a waiver and provided with program descriptions in a language they can understand.

  2. Students who are under age 10, may only be granted waivers if (a) the student has been placed in an ELL classroom for at least 30 calendar days, (b) the school certifies in no less than 250 words that the student “has special and individual physical or psychological needs, separate from lack of English proficiency” that requires an alternative program, and (c) the waiver is authorized by both the school superintendent and principal. All waiver requests and school district responses (approved or disapproved waivers) must be placed in the student’s permanent school record. For students under age 10, both the superintendent and the principal must authorize the waiver, and it must be made under guidelines established by, and subject to the review of the local school committee. These guidelines may, but are not required to, contain an appeals process. Students who are over age 10 may be granted waivers when it is the informed belief of the school principal and educational staff that an alternative program would be better for the student’s overall educational progress. Students receiving waivers may be transferred to an educationally recognized and legally permitted ELL program other than a sheltered English immersion or two-way bilingual program. See 603 CMR 14.04 and ELE 5.


Authority: G.L. c. 71A, § 5; 603 CMR 14.04(3)






Rating: Implemented

District Response Required:

No











CRITERION

NUMBER

     




Legal Standard



ELE 5

Program Placement and Structure




1. The district uses assessment data to plan and implement educational programs for students at different instructional levels.



2.The district places ELL students in

        1. “Sheltered English Immersion” (SEI) classrooms. SEI has two components, English as a Second Language (ESL) instruction and sheltered content instruction as described in G.L. c. 71A, §§ 2 and 4; or

        2. “Two-Way Bilingual” classrooms, in which students develop language proficiency in two languages by receiving instruction in English and another language in a classroom that is usually comprised of an equal number of proficient English speakers and proficient speakers of the other language; or

        3. (for kindergarten students) either a sheltered English immersion, two-way bilingual, or an English-only language general education classroom with assistance in English language acquisition, including, but not limited to, ESL; or

        4. (as a result of an approved waiver) bilingual education or another educationally recognized and legally permitted ELE program, in which the students are taught all courses required by law and by the school district.

  1. Regardless of the program model, districts provide ELL students with content instruction and ESL instruction that is aligned to the 2011 Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and integrates WIDA English Language Development (ELD) Standards.


Authority: Title VI; EEOA; G.L. c. 71A, §§ 2, 4, 7





Rating: Implemented

District Response Required:

No











CRITERION

NUMBER

     




Legal Standard


ELE 6

Program Exit and Readiness





  1. The district does not reclassify Limited English Proficient (LEP) students as Former Limited English Proficient (FLEP) until he or she is deemed English proficient and can participate meaningfully in all aspects of the district’s general education program without the use of adapted or simplified English materials.

  2. Districts do not limit or cap the amount of time in which an ELL student can remain in a language support program. An ELL student only exits from such a program after he or she is determined to be proficient in English.



Authority: Title VI; EEOA; G.L. c. 71A, § 4





Rating: Implemented

District Response Required:

No




CRITERION

NUMBER

ENGLISH LEARNER EDUCATION


III. PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT



Legal Standard


ELE 7

Parent Involvement

The district develops ways to include parents or guardians of ELL students in matters pertaining to their children’s education and ELE programs.


Authority: Title VI; EEOA; Title III





Rating: Implemented

District Response Required:

No




CRITERION

NUMBER

ENGLISH LEARNER EDUCATION


IV. CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION



Legal Standard


ELE 8

Declining Entry to a Program

The district provides English language support to students whose parents have declined entry to a sheltered English immersion, two-way bilingual or other ELE program.


Authority: Title VI; EEOA; G.L. c. 71, §38Q1/2





Rating: Implemented

District Response Required:

No





CRITERION

NUMBER

     




Legal Standard


ELE 9
Instructional Grouping







  1. The district only groups ELL students of different ages together in instructional settings if their levels of English proficiency are similar.

  2. The district’s grouping of students ensures that ELL students receive effective content instruction at appropriate academic levels and that ESL instruction is provided at the appropriate proficiency level. ESL instruction should be aligned to the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and must integrate components of the WIDA English Language Development (ELD) Standards.


Authority: Title VI; EEOA; G.L. c. 71A, § 4




Rating: Implemented

District Response Required:

No





CRITERION

NUMBER

     




Legal Standard


ELE 10

Parent Notification





  1. Upon identification of a student as ELL, and annually thereafter, a notice is mailed to the parents or guardians written where practicable in the primary/home language as well as in English, that informs parents of:

  1. the reasons for identification of the student as ELL;

  2. the child’s level of English proficiency;

  3. program placement and/or the method of instruction used in the program;

  4. how the program will meet the educational strengths and needs of the student;

  5. how the program will specifically help the child learn English;

  6. the specific exit requirements;

  7. the parents’ right to apply for a waiver (see ELE 4), or to decline to enroll their child in the program (see ELE 8); and

  8. If the student has additional education needs that require Special Education Services, how the Title III program will meet the objectives of the Individualized Education Plan (IEP)

  1. The district provides parents and guardians of ELL students, with report cards and progress reports in the same manner and with the same frequency as general education reporting. The reports are, as practicable, written in a language understandable to the parent/guardian.



Authority: NCLB, Title III, Part C, Sec. 3302(a), (c); G.L. c. 71A, § 7; 603 CMR 14.02




Rating: Implemented

District Response Required:

No





CRITERION

NUMBER

ENGLISH LEARNER EDUCATION


V. STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES



Legal Standard


ELE 11

Equal Access to Academic Programs and Services





  1. The district does not segregate ELL students from their English-speaking peers, except where programmatically necessary, to implement an ELL education program.

  2. The district ensures that ELL students participate fully with their English-speaking peers and are provided support in non-core academic courses.

  3. The district ensures that ELL students have the opportunity to receive support services, such as guidance and counseling, in a language that the student understands.

  4. The district ensures that ELL students are taught to the same academic standards and curriculum as all students, and provides the same opportunities to master such standards as other students, including the opportunity to enter academically advanced classes, receive credit for work done, and have access to the full range of programs.

  5. The district uses grade appropriate content objectives for ELL students that are based on the district curricula in English language arts, history and social science, mathematics, and science and technology/engineering, taught by qualified staff members.

  6. Reserved

  7. The district provides access to the full range of academic opportunities and supports afforded non-ELL students, such as special education services, Section 504 Accommodation Plans, Title I services, career and technical education, and the supports outlined in the district’s curriculum accommodation plan.

  8. Information in notices such as activities, responsibilities, and academic standards provided to all students is provided to ELL students in a language and mode of communication that they understand.


Authority: Title VI; EEOA; G.L. c. 71, § 38Q1/2; 603 CMR 28.03(3)(a); c. 71A, § 7; c. 76, § 5; 603 CMR 26.03; 603 CMR 26.07(8)






Rating: Implemented

District Response Required:

No



CRITERION

NUMBER

     




Legal Standard


ELE 12

Equal Access to Nonacademic and Extracurricular Programs





  1. The district provides appropriate support, where necessary, to ELL students to ensure that they have equal access to the nonacademic programs and extracurricular activities available to their English-speaking peers.

  2. Information provided to students about extracurricular activities and school events is provided to ELL students in a language they understand.



Authority: Title VI; EEOA; G.L. c. 76, § 5; 603 CMR 26.06(2)





Rating: Implemented

District Response Required:

No








CRITERION

NUMBER

     




Legal Standard


ELE 13

Follow-up Support

The district actively monitors students who have exited an ELL education program for two years and provides language support services to those students, if needed.




Authority: Title VI; EEOA; NCLB; Title III





Rating: Implemented

District Response Required:

No



CRITERION

NUMBER

ENGLISH LEARNER EDUCATION


VI. FACULTY, STAFF AND ADMINISTRATION



Legal Standard


ELE 14

Licensure Requirements

The SY 12-13 through SY 15-16 will be transition years in districts with respect to ELE 14 because, among other things, cohorts of incumbent core academic teachers of ELLs will be participating in training to earn an SEI Teacher Endorsement. The same is true of building administrators who must earn an SEI Administrator Endorsement. From SY 12-13 to SY 15-16, the Department will gather data and documentation concerning criterion 2 c) of revised ELE 14, and professional development documentation required by revised ELE 14 and 15, through a process different from the CPR process. (It should be noted that ESL licensed teachers qualify for an SEI Teacher Endorsement and are not required to participate in the SEI cohort training.)



  1. Reserved.

  2. Licensure requirements for districts where ELLs are enrolled:

  1. Every district, including every Commonwealth charter school, has at least one teacher who has an English as a Second Language or Transitional Bilingual Education, or ELL license under G.L. c.71, § 38G and 603 CMR 7.04(3). (This requirement does not apply separately to Horace Mann charter schools.)

  2. Except at Commonwealth charter schools, every teacher or other educational staff member who teaches ELL students holds an appropriate license or current waiver issued by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.

  3. Every district, including every charter school, takes steps to ensure that each core academic teacher of one or more ELLs as defined in 603 CMR 7.02, participates in cohort training to obtain an SEI Teacher endorsement during the time designated for the educator’s cohort or otherwise obtains the endorsement through another pathway. Similarly, every district, including every charter school, takes steps to ensure that each principal/assistant principal and supervisor/director who supervises or evaluates such teachers participates in cohort training, or pursues another pathway to obtain an SEI Administrator endorsement during the time designated for the educator’s cohort. Department’s expectations include:

  1. Collaborating with the Department to identify incumbent core academic teachers of ELLs and the administrators who supervise and evaluate such teachers;

  2. Collaborating with the Department to identify which of the incumbent core academic teachers or administrators have participated in two of more the following Category Trainings: category 1, 2 or 4.

  3. Providing a location for delivery of the SEI training and schedule for the delivery of the training sessions

  4. Informing educators of their obligation to attend trainings with their cohort group to earn the SEI endorsement.

3. Except at Commonwealth charter schools, any director of ELL programs who is employed in that role for one-half time or more has a Supervisor/Director license and an English as a Second Language, Transitional Bilingual Education or an ELL license.

4. If a district with 200 or more ELL students—including all charter schools with 200 or more ELL students—has a director of ELL programs, that director has an English as a Second Language, Transitional Bilingual Education, or an ELL license even if he or she is employed in that position for less than one-half time. (This requirement does not apply separately to Horace Mann charter schools.)

Authority: Title VI; EEOA; G.L. c. 71, § 38G, §89(qq); St. 2002, c. 218, §§ 24, 25, 30; 603 CMR 7.04(3), 7.09(3); 603 CMR 7.14 (1) and (2); 603 CMR 14.07.





Rating: Implemented

District Response Required:
No









CRITERION

NUMBER

     




Legal Standard


ELE 15
Professional Development Requirements



See comment in ELE 14.

Districts, including all charter schools, maintain documentation of their plans to make the SEI cohort training available to their core academic teachers of ELLs and the building administrators who supervise such teachers and to collaborate with the Department to facilitate the provision of the training and participation of district teachers and administrators in the training. .
Districts awarded Title III funds must provide high-quality professional development to classroom teachers (including teachers in classroom settings that are not the settings of language instruction educational programs), principals, administrators, and other school or community-based organizational personnel, that is —

(A) designed to improve the instruction and assessment of limited English proficient children;

(B) designed to enhance the ability of such teachers to understand and use curricula, assessment measures, and instruction strategies for limited English proficient children;

(C) based on scientifically based research demonstrating the effectiveness of the professional development in increasing children's English proficiency or substantially increasing the subject matter knowledge, teaching knowledge, and teaching skills of such teachers; and

(D) of sufficient intensity and duration (which shall not include activities such as one-day or short-term workshops and conferences) to have a positive and lasting impact on the teachers' performance in the classroom.

Authority: NCLB; Title III § 3115 (c) 2; EEOA; 603 CMR 14.07.





Rating: Implemented

District Response Required:
No




CRITERION

NUMBER

ENGLISH LEARNER EDUCATION


VII. SCHOOL FACILITIES



Legal Standard


ELE 16

Equitable Facilities

The district ensures that ELL students are provided facilities, materials and services comparable to those provided to the overall student population.


Authority: Title VI; EEOA; G.L. c. 76, § 5; 603 CMR 26.07




Rating: Implemented

District Response Required:

No




CRITERION

NUMBER

ENGLISH LEARNER EDUCATION


VIII. PROGRAM PLAN AND EVALUATION



Legal Standard


ELE 17

Program Evaluation

The district conducts periodic evaluations of the effectiveness of its ELE program in developing students’ English language skills and increasing their ability to participate meaningfully in the educational program. Where the district documents that the program is not effective, it takes steps to make appropriate program adjustments or changes that are responsive to the outcomes of the program evaluation.


Authority: Title VI; EEOA. Title III § 3121





Rating: Implemented

District Response Required:

No




CRITERION

NUMBER

ENGLISH LEARNER EDUCATION


IX. RECORD KEEPING



Legal Standard


ELE 18
Records of LEP Students



ELL student records include:



  1. home language survey;

  2. results of identification and proficiency tests and evaluations, including MEPA and MELA-O until SY 2011/2012

  3. ACCESS for ELLs test from SY 2012/2013;

  4. MCAS or other tests chosen by the Board of Education and the district;

  5. information about students’ previous school experiences;

  6. copies of parent notification letters,

  7. progress reports and report cards in the native language, if necessary;

  8. report cards, in the native language, if necessary;

  9. evidence of follow-up monitoring, if applicable;

  10. documentation of a parent’s consent to “opt-out” of ELL education, if applicable;

  11. waiver documentation, if applicable



Authority: Title VI; EEOA; G.L. c. 69, § 1I; c. 71A, §§ 5, 7; 603 CMR 14.02, 14.04





Rating: Implemented

District Response Required:

No


This Coordinated Program Review Final Report is also available at:

http://www.doe.mass.edu/pqa/review/cpr/reports/.

Profile information supplied by each charter school and school district, including information for individual schools within districts, is available at



http://profiles.doe.mass.edu/.





Final Report ELE – 2014

File Name:

EMK CPR ELE Final Report 2014

Last Revised on:

September 12, 2014


Prepared by:

LAS/JLE/SH






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