Congratulations! You’re almost done! English 2, V14, Segment 2 Exam Review Guide



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English 2, V14, Segment 2 Exam Review Guide
Your final exam is made up of two parts.
Part 1

Part 1 contains multiple-choice questions. The majority of this section of the exam will have you reading 2-3 paragraph passages and speeches in order to answer questions about what you read. For that reason, it is important that you understand how to read and analyze a complex text.


You will need to be able to do the following:

  • Determine what different passages imply (or mean) about the narrator’s view

  • Determine the tone of a passage

  • Determine meanings of words in context

  • Identify the main idea of a passage

  • Identify the supporting details of a passage

  • Identify the purpose of a specific word, phrase, or paragraph

Lesson 3.03 (p.5) includes an interactive reading of FDR’s speech when you click on the link to the speech. Reading the speech, along with the summary and reflection questions, will help remind you of how to break down a text. Also, pay close attention to the interactives, links, and other lesson helps as you read Julius Caesar in 4.02-4.05. This is another complex text, the type of which you will see on the exam.
You should also be familiar with this:

  • Homonyms and apostrophes (4.01)

  • Elements of non-fiction text (3.02)

  • Logical fallacies (4.06)

  • Creating an outline (4.10)

  • Revision and editing process (4.12)

  • Argument: claims and counterclaims (4.06-4.08)

Here are some tips to help you prepare for the final exam:

  • Go back through the lessons and make sure you have taken notes on important information

  • Visit your Grade Book – look at assignments or quizzes that you scored low on. Review what needed improvement and familiarize yourself with those concepts

  • As you take the final exam you will see that many of the questions require you to read a passage and then answer questions about the passage. You will answer questions about the tone, the author’s purpose, the character’s view, the main idea, supporting details, and different conflict. You should take notes on the passages in the exam so you can make sure you are taking time to read and comprehend the passage completely. Always use evidence from the text (quotes , summaries, and paraphrases from what you read) to support your ideas. Your opinion alone is not enough for a good score. Your teacher will always be asking, “How is this student supporting this idea based on the passage?” as your test is graded.

Your Module 3 and Module 4 Pre-tests and Post-tests are the CLOSEST to your Final Exam. Review what you missed and discuss it with your teacher if you don’t understand your mistakes.
Part 2

Part 2 of the exam will require to you write a 1-3 paragraph response. You will be given a passage to read and a piece of art that goes along with the passage. Then you will be given a prompt on which to base your response.




  • Review Fear 4 on how to compare and contrast texts

  • Please take time to outline your response on scratch paper and fully develop your ideas.

  • Be sure to include quotes and specific details from your reading.

  • Be sure are addressing the prompt and adhering to the length requirements.

Honors Students

In addition to the information above, you should also be familiar with the following:



  • Logos, pathos, ethos (4.06, 4.13)

  • Literary criticism (3.11)

  • Characteristics of Gothic literature (3.06)


You need to earn a passing score on the exam to get your credit for the course.
Examples of types of questions you may see on the final:
1. In this speech Roosevelt termed, for the first time, journalists as muckrakers.

Muck-rake- n. A rake for scraping up muck or dung

Muckrake- v. To search out and publicly expose real or apparent misconduct of a prominent individual or business

SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 1906

In Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress you may recall the description of the Man with the Muck-rake, the man who could look no way but downward, with the muck-rake in his hand; who was offered a celestial crown for his muck-rake, but who would neither look up nor regard the crown he was offered, but continued to rake to himself the filth of the floor.

In Pilgrim's Progress the Man with the Muck-rake is set forth as the example of him whose vision is fixed on carnal instead of on spiritual things. Yet he also typifies the man who in this life consistently refuses to see aught that is lofty, and fixes his eyes with solemn intentness only on that which is vile and debasing. Now, it is very necessary that we should not flinch from seeing what is vile and debasing. There is filth on the floor and it must be scraped up with the muck-rake; and there are times and places where this service is the most needed of all the services that can be performed. But the man who never does anything else, who never thinks or speaks or writes, save of his feats with the muck-rake, speedily becomes, not a help to society, not an incitement to good, but one of the most potent forces for evil.

There are, in the body politic, economic and social, many and grave evils, and there is urgent necessity for the sternest war upon them. There should be relentless exposure of and attack upon every evil man whether politician or business man, every evil practice, whether in politics, in business, or in social life. I hail as a benefactor every writer or speaker, every man who, on the platform, or in book, magazine, or newspaper, with merciless severity makes such attack, provided always that he in his turn remembers that the attack is of use only if it is absolutely truthful. . . To assail the great and admitted evils of our political and industrial life with such crude and sweeping generalizations as to include decent men in the general condemnation means the searing of the public conscience. There results a general attitude either of cynical belief in and indifference to public corruption or else of a distrustful inability to discriminate between the good and the bad. Either attitude is fraught with untold damage to the country as a whole. The fool who has not sense to discriminate between what is good and what is bad is well-nigh as dangerous as the man who does discriminate and yet chooses the bad. There is nothing more distressing to every good patriot, to every good American, than the hard, scoffing spirit which treats the allegation of dishonesty in a public man as a cause for laughter. Such laughter is worse than the crackling of thorns under a pot, for it denotes not merely the vacant mind, but the heart in which high emotions have been choked before they could grow to fruition.

What does Roosevelt mean when he says a muck-raker is like a person who "fixes his eyes only on that which is vile and debasing"?

 A. He is comparing muck-rakers with people who enjoy creating problems.

 B. He is comparing muck-rakers with people who focus on negative things. 

 C. He is establishing a standard from which to judge whether people are good or bad.

 D. He is establishing a standard of what is good muck-raking and what is bad muck-raking.



2. from Ragged Dick By Horatio Alger

Getting up too was an equally short process. He jumped out of the box, shook himself, picked out one or two straws that had found their way into rents in his clothes, and, drawing a well-worn cap over his uncombed locks, he was all ready for the business of the day.

Dick's appearance as he stood beside the box was rather peculiar. His pants were torn in several places, and had apparently belonged in the first instance to a boy two sizes larger than himself. He wore a vest, all the buttons of which were gone except two, out of which peeped a shirt which looked as if it had been worn a month. To complete his costume he wore a coat too long for him, dating back, if one might judge from its general appearance, to a remote antiquity.

Washing the face and hands is usually considered proper in commencing the day, but Dick was above such refinement. He had no particular dislike to dirt, and did not think it necessary to remove several dark streaks on his face and hands. But in spite of his dirt and rags there was something about Dick that was attractive. It was easy to see that if he had been clean and well-dressed he would have been decidedly good-looking. Some of his companions were sly, and their faces inspired distrust; but Dick had a frank, straight-forward manner that made him a favorite.

How is Dick characterized by Alger in this excerpt from the passage?

"Washing the face and hands is usually considered proper in commencing the day, but Dick was above such refinement. He had no particular dislike to dirt, and did not think it necessary to remove several dark streaks on his face and hands."

 A. He is indifferent. 

 B. He is intense.

 C. He is selective.

 D. He is fearful.



3. In this speech Roosevelt termed, for the first time, journalists as muckrakers.

Muck-rake- n. A rake for scraping up muck or dung

Muckrake- v. To search out and publicly expose real or apparent misconduct of a prominent individual or business

SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 1906

In Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress you may recall the description of the Man with the Muck-rake, the man who could look no way but downward, with the muck-rake in his hand; who was offered a celestial crown for his muck-rake, but who would neither look up nor regard the crown he was offered, but continued to rake to himself the filth of the floor.

In Pilgrim's Progress the Man with the Muck-rake is set forth as the example of him whose vision is fixed on carnal instead of on spiritual things. Yet he also typifies the man who in this life consistently refuses to see aught that is lofty, and fixes his eyes with solemn intentness only on that which is vile and debasing. Now, it is very necessary that we should not flinch from seeing what is vile and debasing. There is filth on the floor and it must be scraped up with the muck-rake; and there are times and places where this service is the most needed of all the services that can be performed. But the man who never does anything else, who never thinks or speaks or writes, save of his feats with the muck-rake, speedily becomes, not a help to society, not an incitement to good, but one of the most potent forces for evil.

There are, in the body politic, economic and social, many and grave evils, and there is urgent necessity for the sternest war upon them. There should be relentless exposure of and attack upon every evil man whether politician or business man, every evil practice, whether in politics, in business, or in social life. I hail as a benefactor every writer or speaker, every man who, on the platform, or in book, magazine, or newspaper, with merciless severity makes such attack, provided always that he in his turn remembers that the attack is of use only if it is absolutely truthful. . . To assail the great and admitted evils of our political and industrial life with such crude and sweeping generalizations as to include decent men in the general condemnation means the searing of the public conscience. There results a general attitude either of cynical belief in and indifference to public corruption or else of a distrustful inability to discriminate between the good and the bad. Either attitude is fraught with untold damage to the country as a whole. The fool who has not sense to discriminate between what is good and what is bad is well-nigh as dangerous as the man who does discriminate and yet chooses the bad. There is nothing more distressing to every good patriot, to every good American, than the hard, scoffing spirit which treats the allegation of dishonesty in a public man as a cause for laughter. Such laughter is worse than the crackling of thorns under a pot, for it denotes not merely the vacant mind, but the heart in which high emotions have been choked before they could grow to fruition.

Which of the following lines from the speech supports the idea that Roosevelt thinks truthful investigative journalism is a necessity?

A.  "There should be relentless exposure of and attack upon every evil man whether politician or business man, every evil practice, whether in politics, in business, or in social life." 

B. "There results a general attitude either of cynical belief in and indifference to public corruption or else of a distrustful inability to discriminate between the good and the bad."

 C. "The fool who has not sense to discriminate between what is good and what is bad is well-nigh as dangerous as the man who does discriminate and yet chooses the bad."

D.  "Such laughter is worse than the crackling of thorns under a pot, for it denotes not merely the vacant mind, but the heart in which high emotions have been choked before they could grow to fruition."



4. Read the sentences and answer the question that follows.

Juliet:
Good night, good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow,


That I shall say good night till it be morrow.

Which statement best interprets the contradiction sweet sorrow in this text?

 A. Juliet cannot bear to be parted from her beloved and will die if he leaves.

 B. Juliet greatly dislikes the listener, but plans to see him at the next opportunity.

 C. Juliet is sad to leave her beloved but looks forward to seeing him tomorrow. 

 D. Juliet is unsure of her feelings for the listener and wants some time apart.



5. Read the passage and answer the question that follows:

Despite our best efforts as parents, we will always make mistakes in raising our children. It's inevitable. There are so many decisions to be made in any given day, week, month, or year. It's an inhuman task to make all of these decisions correctly. Who would even want to try for perfection?

We shouldn't worry too much, though, because it is precisely our mistakes that teach our children the most about life. Life is full of mistakes, obstacles, and trouble. Shielding our children from these by striving for perfection in our own parenting does them no favors.

Given this, a parent might be tempted to give up trying to make good decisions and simply let the chips fall where they may. Admittedly, that attitude is not without its benefits, but it goes too far in the other direction. Children are much more observant than we think, but often draw the wrong conclusions from what they observe. If we give up trying to make the right decisions, they might get the message that we don't care about their future.

We can take comfort in this much: we teach our children even when we're not trying to. That doesn't mean we should stop trying to do our best, to make the right decisions whenever possible. It just means that we shouldn't beat ourselves up when we make mistakes. Either it won't matter because it's something small, or it just might build some character in our children, a commodity that will serve them well.

Which of these best explains why the argument in this passage is weak?

 A. The argument doesn't take into account opposing points of view.

B. The argument relies on attacking a weak version of the opposition.

 C. The claim is not valid.

D.  The argument relies on claims that are not backed up by facts. 


6. Read the passage and answer the question that follows:

Despite our best efforts as parents, we will always make mistakes in raising our children. It's inevitable. There are so many decisions to be made in any given day, week, month, or year. It's an inhuman task to make all of these decisions correctly. Who would even want to try for perfection?

We shouldn't worry too much, though, because it is precisely our mistakes that teach our children the most about life. Life is full of mistakes, obstacles, and trouble. Shielding our children from these by striving for perfection in our own parenting does them no favors.

Given this, a parent might be tempted to give up trying to make good decisions and simply let the chips fall where they may. Admittedly, that attitude is not without its benefits, but it goes too far in the other direction. Children are much more observant than we think, but often draw the wrong conclusions from what they observe. If we give up trying to make the right decisions, they might get the message that we don't care about their future.

We can take comfort in this much: we teach our children even when we're not trying to. That doesn't mean we should stop trying to do our best, to make the right decisions whenever possible. It just means that we shouldn't beat ourselves up when we make mistakes. Either it won't matter because it's something small, or it just might build some character in our children, a commodity that will serve them well.

Which of these sentences from the passage most directly expresses the counterclaim?

 A. "We can take comfort in this much: we teach our children even when we're not trying to."

 B. "Given this, a parent might be tempted to give up trying to make good decisions and simply let the chips fall where they may." 

 C. "Shielding our children from these [mistakes] by striving for perfection in our own parenting does them no favors."

 D. "We shouldn't worry too much, though, because it is precisely our mistakes that teach our children the most about life."



7. Chief Joseph's Surrender Speech, October 5, 1877
by Chief Joseph

Tell General Howard I know his heart. What he told me before, I have it in my heart. I am tired of fighting. Our Chiefs are killed; Looking Glass is dead, Ta Hool Hool Shute is dead. The old men are all dead. It is the young men who say yes or no. He who led on the young men is dead. It is cold, and we have no blankets; the little children are freezing to death. My people, some of them, have run away to the hills, and have no blankets, no food. No one knows where they are—perhaps freezing to death. I want to have time to look for my children, and see how many of them I can find. Maybe I shall find them among the dead. Hear me, my Chiefs! I am tired; my heart is sick and sad. From where the sun now stands I will fight no more forever.

Why might Chief Joseph mention "General Howard" in the first sentence in his speech?

 A. To show defiance

 B. To show his sorrow

 C. Because that is to whom he is surrendering 

 D. Because he fought alongside General Howard

8. Read the passage and answer the question that follows:

Despite our best efforts as parents, we will always make mistakes in raising our children. It's inevitable. There are so many decisions to be made in any given day, week, month, or year. It's an inhuman task to make all of these decisions correctly. Who would even want to try for perfection?

We shouldn't worry too much, though, because it is precisely our mistakes that teach our children the most about life. Life is full of mistakes, obstacles, and trouble. Shielding our children from these by striving for perfection in our own parenting does them no favors.

Given this, a parent might be tempted to give up trying to make good decisions and simply let the chips fall where they may. Admittedly, that attitude is not without its benefits, but it goes too far in the other direction. Children are much more observant than we think, but often draw the wrong conclusions from what they observe. If we give up trying to make the right decisions, they might get the message that we don't care about their future.

We can take comfort in this much: we teach our children even when we're not trying to. That doesn't mean we should stop trying to do our best, to make the right decisions whenever possible. It just means that we shouldn't beat ourselves up when we make mistakes. Either it won't matter because it's something small, or it just might build some character in our children, a commodity that will serve them well.

"Given this, a parent might be tempted to give up trying to make good decisions and simply let the chips fall where they may."

What words in this sentence signal a relationship? 

 A. Might be

 B. Given this 

 C. They may

 D. And simply

9. from "The Lady of Shalott"
by Alfred, Lord Tennyson 

In the stormy east-wind straining,


The pale-yellow woods were waning,
The broad stream in his banks complaining,
Heavily the low sky raining
Over tower'd Camelot;
Down she came and found a boat
Beneath a willow left afloat,
And round about the prow she wrote
The Lady of Shalott.

And down the river's dim expanse—


Like some bold seër in a trance,
Seeing all his own mischance—
With a glassy countenance
Did she look to Camelot.
And at the closing of the day
She loosed the chain, and down she lay;
The broad stream bore her far away,
The Lady of Shalott.

The setting sun in the painting and the gathering storm in the poem create a feeling of

 A. tranquility

 B. despair 

 C. hope

D.  stability



10. Read the excerpt from Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.

Brutus
It must be by his death, and for my part
I know no personal cause to spurn at him
But for the general. He would be crowned.
How that might change his nature, there’s the question.
It is the bright day that brings forth the adder
And that craves wary walking. Crown him that,
And then I grant we put a sting in him
That at his will he may do danger with.
Th' abuse of greatness is when it disjoins
Remorse from power. And, to speak truth of Caesar,
I have not known when his affections swayed
More than his reason. But ’tis a common proof
That lowliness is young ambition’s ladder,
Whereto the climber upward turns his face.
But when he once attains the upmost round,
He then unto the ladder turns his back,
Looks in the clouds, scorning the base degrees
By which he did ascend. So Caesar may.
Then, lest he may, prevent. And since the quarrel
Will bear no color for the thing he is,
Fashion it thus: that what he is, augmented,
Would run to these and these extremities.
And therefore think him as a serpent’s egg—
Which, hatched, would as his kind grow mischievous—
And kill him in the shell.

Which of these lines from the play indicates that Brutus fears Caesar will become a corrupt ruler?

A.  "It must be by his death, and for my part/I know no personal cause to spurn at him"

 B. "And, to speak truth of Caesar/I have not known when his affections swayed/More than his reason."

C.  "But ’tis a common proof/That lowliness is young ambition’s ladder,"

D.  "Crown him that,/And then I grant we put a sting in him/That at his will he may do danger with." 



Answers:

  1. B

  2. A

  3. A

  4. C

  5. D

  6. B

  7. C

  8. B

  9. B

  10. D


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