Conference Schedule Friday April 26, 2013 Please see abstract section for abstracts of presentations



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Conference Schedule
Friday April 26, 2013
Please see abstract section for abstracts of presentations.

Poster Session - 2:30-3:30



Lecture Center Hallway (by LC 30 and LC 31)
Rachel Brotman:

“Can you understand me now? Effective techniques for accent adaptation.”


Brendan Flinn:

“A Quantitative Analysis of Health Care Reform-Focused Advertisements in the 2010 Congressional Elections.”

Daniel Gustafson:

“Lethal Negotiation: The Effects of Violence on the Likelihood of State-Organization Negotiation.”



Welcome and Award Presentations: 3:30-4:30

James Dias, Ph.D., Vice President for Research

Lecture Center Hallway (by LC 30 and LC 31)
Zachary Grieb:

“The role of progesterone receptors in the mediation of GABAergic Neurons.”


Michael Hovish:

“Switching Parameters as a Function of Annealing Conditions in HfO2 Resistive Memory Devices (RMD).”


James Iuliano:

“Characterizing the Metastatic Phenotype of Cancer Cells using Nanoscale Lined-Topography.”


Michael Johnson:

“Validation of The Light/Dark Social Avoidance Test

Using the Fragile X Mouse Model.”
Melissa McGreal:

“Process of Adult and Childhood Sexual Assault Disclosure.”


Brittany Mooney:

“Effects of Induced Mood on Memory.”


Thomas Postiglione:

“Amide I vibrational mode suppression in surface (SERS) and tip (TERS) enhanced Raman spectra of protein specimens.”
Shelby Quackenbush:

“At the Northern Border: The Hill Tribe Struggle for Human Rights, Status, and Citizenship within Thailand’s Booming Sex Industry.”


Zachary Richards:

“The Detection of Non-transiting Exoplanets.”


Heather Smith:

“The Effects of Progesterone Receptor on Development of Serotonergic Circuits that Mediate Cognition.”


Lauren Stern:

“Just breathe: What does it take to be a Stage Manager.”


Bradley Sutliff:

“Aptamer-Linked Nanoparticles to Target Ovarian Cancer Cells.”


Alex Talamo:

“Using bioglycogen dendrimeric nanoparticles as a novel, non-toxic transfection agent to deliver siRNA to ovarian cancer cells.”


Adele Touhey:

“Questioning the Validity of Accusations Made by China and the U.S. on Cyber-Espionage Activities.”




Session I - 4:30-6:00


LC 3A: Presentations

Moderator:


Shaina Bienvenue:

“Marian McPartland: Contributions to Piano and Jazz.”


Sugyan Dixit:

“Hiromi Uehara: Rise of Jazz Virtuoso.”


Lauren Kornak:

“Iconic Black Composers: Scott Joplin’s Role in American Piano Music and American Society.”


Stacy Heller:

“Gershwin and Rhapsody in Blue: A Musical Era Is Born.”


Kevin Judd:

“Henry Cowell.”


LC 3B: Presentations

Moderator:


Alvin George:

“Galanin’s effects in Alzheimer’s Disease: Potential approaches to countering cognitive impairments.”

Prince Jacob:

“Identification of modified nucleotides in viral RNA genomes by mass spectrometry and the L-A dsRNA virus as a model.”


Zachary Olmsted:

“From Yeast to Human: Novel Insights Into Control of Mitotic Spindle Assembly Through Functional Regulation of the Microtubule Organizing Center.”


Jennifer Pollard:

“Implications of Tanzanian Culture on Nutrition and Their Effects in People Living with HIV/AIDS.”



LC 3C: Presentations

Moderator:


Stanley Abraham:

“Direction of embryonic salivary gland development and differentiation by Rac1.”


Alexandra Briggs:

“The Effects of Callous Unemotional Traits in Children on Adulthood Criminality with a Moderator of Therapy.


Ian Andrew Lepkowsky:

“Social Media Fetishism: The Substitution of Life and Disavowal of Death.”


Rochel Rubin:

“Cold as an Entity.”


Ashley Bishop:

“Circus Ecuado.”




Saturday April 27, 2013
Please see abstract section for abstracts of presentations.

Session II - 12:00-1:15

LC 3A: Presentations

Moderator:


Daniel Levy:

“James P. Johnson and his Influence on Modern Jazz.”


Katie Schimanski:

“Leo Ornstein and His Impact on Futurism.”


Deidre Pinkerton:

“Jazz Influence on Classical Music.”



LC 3B: Presentations

Moderator:


Fatima Aboul-Seoud:

“Factors Affecting the Detection of Relationship Status Deception.”


M. Siobhan Webber:

“Open Source and Libraries: An Overview.”


James Thompson:

“Pity and AIDS: Performative Ethics.”


LC 3C: Presentations

Moderator:


Cortney von Hahmann:

“Diastereoselective synthesis of pentafluorosulfanylated β-lactams, precursors for docetaxel modification.”


Anna Mondello:

“Bliss in Barnes: How a Loss is Still a Gain.”


Smriti Sinha:

“Katha Revisited: The Story Behind the Story.”




Session III - 1:30-3:00
LC 3A: Presentations

Moderator:


Franklin Berkeley:

“Jelly Roll Morton.”


Jacob Crofoot:

“John Cage and His Prepared Piano.”


Natalya Mokhor:

“Mary Lou Williams and Jazz.”


Sahan Shrestha:

“Art Tatum.”



LC 3B: Presentations

Moderator:


Sebastian Agosti:

“The ‘Dirty War’ in Argentina.”


Samantha Arpino:

“Chasing Perfection: Exploring the Impact of Popular Culture’s Formation of ‘The Ideal Woman’ on Women in the Contemporary United States.”


Luis Gabriel Sanchez:

“Andean Cosmologies in the Ontological Crisis of the 21st Century.”


Nikoleta Papa:

“Language Contact and Variation in the Spanish of Catalonia.”


Mathew Weiss:

“Explaining Revolution to Children: The Influence of Domestic Radicalism on the Portrayal of Russian Radical Intelligentsia in Anglo-American Children’s Literature, 1925-1935.”


LC 3C: Presentations

Moderator:


Justin Coon:

“Nanochemoprevention of breast cancer: Enhanced delivery and anticancer effects of pomegranate polyphenols in breast cancer cells.”


Kathryn Fanning:

“Antibiotic intolerance and resistance: Aminoglycoside binding to bacterial and human ribosomal RNA targets.”


Rajan Kumar:

“Molecularly imprinted polymers for development of an in-situ biosensor.”


Alex Schin:

“The role of the functional domains of the human RNA helicase RCK/p54 on hepatitus C virus gene expression.”




Session IV- 3:15-4:30

LC 3A: Presentations

Moderator:


Julie Ann Bingham:

“Walking Corpses & Conscious Plants: Possibilist Ecologies in Graphic Novels.”


Autumn Kuklinski:

“Hulk Smash! Regulating Anger Requires More Self-control Strength.”


Kevin Smith:

“Experiencing Kaqchikel Tikonela.”



LC 3C: Presentations

Moderator:


Max Lawatsch:

“A Revolutionalized Coterie: The Transformation of British Romantic Critical Practices and Contemporary Internet Fora.”


Austin Gunn Litwhiler:

“From Pulp to Webpage: Homestuck and Postmodern Digital Narrative.”


Ariana Wedin:

“How and for what reasons did American medical doctors react to the Vietnam War and how did they relate their reasons to their profession?”




Undergraduate Research at the University at Albany

Award and Funding Recipients, 2012-2013

More information about each project can be found in the abstracts section of this program.






Presidential Undergraduate Research Awards
Stanly Abraham: Biology: “Direction of Embryonic Salivary Gland Development and Differentiation by Rac1.”

Faculty Mentors: Melinda Larsen and Sharon Sequeira.


Julie Ann Bingham: English: “Walking Corpses & Conscious Plants: Possibilist Ecologies in Graphic Novels.”

Faculty Mentor: Eric Keenaghan.


Zachary Grieb: Psychology: “The Role of Progesterone Receptor in the Mediation of GABAergic Neurons.”

Faculty Mentor: Christine Wagner.


Autumn Kuklinski: Psychology: “Hulk Smash! Regulating Anger Requires More Self-control Strength.”

Faculty Mentor: Mark Muraven.


Max Lawatsch: English: “A Revolutionalized Coterie: The Transformation of British Romantic Critical Practices and Contemporary Internet Fora”

Faculty Mentor: Kir Kuiken.


Ian Andrew Lepkowsky: English: “Social Media Fetishism: The Substitution of Life and Disavowal of Death.”

Faculty Mentor: Mary Valentis.


Austin Gunner Litwhiler: English: “From Pulp to Webpage: Homestuck and Postmodern Digital Narrative.”

Faculty Mentor: Patricia Chu.


Luis Gabriel Sanchez: Globalization & Latin American, Caribbean and U.S. Latino Studies: “Andean Cosmologies in the Ontological Crisis of the 21st Century.”

Faculty Mentor: Fernando Leiva.


Kevin Smith: Anthropology: “Experiencing Kaqchikel Tikonela.”

Faculty Mentor: Walter Little.


Heather Smith: Psychology: “The Effects of Progesterone Receptor on Development of Serotonergic Circuits that Mediate Cognition.”

Faculty Mentor: Christine Wagner


Courtney von Hahmann: Chemistry: “Diastereoselectives synthesis of pentafluorosulfanylated β-lactams, precursors for docetaxel modification.”

Faculty Mentor: John Welch.


Arianna Wedin: History: “How and for what reasons did American medical doctors react to the Vietnam War and how did they relate their reasons to their profession?”

Faculty Mentor: Carl Bon Tempo.





Partial funding for the Undergraduate Research Conference is provided by the University Auxiliary Services.

Endowed Research Awards:
Justin Coon: Biology (Neuroscience): “Nanochemoprevention of breast cancer: Enhanced delivery and anticancer effects of pomegranate polyphenols in breast cancer cells.”

Faculty Mentor: Ramune Reliene.



Greenwald Endowment
Kathryn Fanning: Biology: “Antibiotic intolerance and resistance: Aminoglycoside binding to bacterial and human ribosomal RNA targets.”

Faculty Mentor: Paul Agris



Schmid Endowment
Alvin J. George: Biology (Neuroscience): “Effects of galanin on cholinergic modulation of memory and hippocampal insulin activity: Interactions with amyloid and Alzheimer's disease.”

Faculty Mentor: Ewan McNay



Zimberg Endowment
James Iuliano: Chemistry: “Characterizing the Metastic Phenotype of Cancer Cells using Nanotopography.”

Faculty Mentor: Nadine Hempel



Greenwald Endowment
Rajan Kumar: Nanoscale Science with Biology Focus: “Molecularly imprinted polymers for development of an in-situ biosensor.”

Faculty Mentor: Magnus Bergkvist



Schmid Endowment
Alex Schin: Biology: “The role of the functional domains of the human RNA helicase RCK/p54 on hepatitus C virus gene expression.”

Faculty Mentor: Cara Pager



Greenwald Endowment
Bradley Sutliff: Nanobioscience: “Aptamer-linked nanoparticles for targeted drug-delivery to ovarian cancer cells.”

Faculty Mentor: Nadine Hempel



Greenwald Endowment
Alex Talamo: Nanoscale Science: “Using bioglycogen dendrimeric nanoparticles as novel, non-toxic transfection agents to deliver siRNA molecules against oncogenes to ovarian cancer cells.”

Faculty Mentor: Nadine Hempel



Greenwald Endowment

Abstracts – Arranged by Session and Room

All project titles and abstracts are printed as received.



Friday April 26, 2013
Poster Session
Lecture Center (by LC 30 and LC 31)
Rachel Brotman: “Can you understand me now? Effective techniques for accent adaptation.” Project Advisor: Laurie Feldman. Department of Psychology.
This experiment examines how native English speakers understand words presented in a foreign accent. Research that improves how people from various cultures can interact with one another when all are not native speakers is important. Previous work by Adank, Hagoort, & Bekkering (2010) proposes that imitating foreign-accented sentences aids adaption to that accent more than passive listening. Kang & Pashler (2011) suggest that interleaving contrasting stimuli at training promotes inductive learning more than blocking by similarity. Our experiment compares three study methods – imitation, repeat, and listening – to examine how English speakers adapt to Dutch-accented English words. We compare identification of old and new words when Dutch-accented words alternate with English-accented words and when only Dutch-accented words occur in training. Our results differ from Kang & Pashler (2011) in that presentation of all Dutch-accented words improves identification of new words more than interleaving them with English-accented words. Thus far, there have not been significant differences between study methods that show listening is less effective than repeating or imitating on adapting to the accented word. Ongoing research examines if these results are task-specific, or if there are mechanisms of production that are being overlooked that aid in adaptation.
****
Brendan Flinn: “A Quantitative Analysis of Health Care Reform-Focused Advertisements in the 2010 Congressional Elections.” Project Advisor: Patricia Stratch. Department of Political Science.
The Affordable Care Act’s merits, constitutionality and implications for health care consumers has been extensively debated since the law was enacted in March, 2010. The months following the intersected with the campaigns for the 2010 US Congressional election, and the ACA became a major issue that determined the outcome of many House and Senate races. A full gamut of special interests spent millions of dollars on advertising that promoted their views on the law and attempted to curry the public’s support. The vast majority of health reform-related advertisements aired were in opposition to the law, which hindered both the public’s support for the ACA and its understanding of the law’s goals and implications.

Prior research has shown that as people become more aware of what the ACA does and does not do, public support for the law increases. Through the analysis of data collected originally by the Wesleyan Media Project, this paper and poster will address questions regarding where advertisements were focused, how much money was spent by each side and how many ads from each side Americans saw. They will also provide a context and explanation of public opinion surrounding the Affordable Care and contribute to the ongoing discussion of the role of special interests in policymaking and elections.


****
Daniel Gustafson: “Lethal Negotiation: The Effects of Violence on the Likelihood of State-Organization Negotiation.” Department of Political Science.
I investigate a few of the underlying preconditions for state-ethno political organization negotiation. Specifically, I explore the effect of organizational violence on the likelihood of reaching the bargaining table. I argue that organizations and states act in a rational and strategic framework. Expanding upon this theory, I argue that negotiation is most likely to occur when it is in the state’s best interest. I claim that negotiation is in the state’s best interest when organizations operate at the extremes of violence, either very low or very high levels. Therefore, I argue that groups using intermediate levels of violence are less likely to experience negotiation with the state. I use a logistic regression on the MAROB dataset from 1980-2004 to test this causal relationship. Although I find no support for my argument regarding the effect of violence on negotiation, my data confirm other claims made in the literature. I close this study with a discussion of my findings and suggestions for further research.


Zachary Grieb: “The Role of Progesterone Receptor in the mediation of GABAergic Neurons.” Project Advisor: Christine Wagner. Department of Psychology.
The prevalence of some developmental behavioral disorders, such as autism, dyslexia and ADHD, are strongly influenced by gender, with a much higher incidence in boys than girls. Understanding the neurobiological mechanisms by which the brains of males and females develop differently may provide clues to understanding the etiology of these disorders. Differential exposure of males and females to steroid hormones such as testosterone play an important role in producing sex differences in behavior in animal models. Steroid hormones activate nuclear receptors, which as transcription factors exert powerful effects on fundamental processes of neural development. During perinatal life, testosterone secretion in males induces significantly higher levels of progesterone receptor (PR) expression in the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) than in females, suggesting that progesterone and its receptor may play an important role in the sexual differentiation of this region. The possible mechanism by which PR generates sex differences might be by regulating levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the rate limiting GABA synthesizing enzyme. GABA, an amino acid neurotransmitter is important for the proper development of neuronal morphology and neural connections, and GABAergic neurons are the target of progestins in adults. In neonatal rats, GAD is expressed in a sexually dimorphic manner, with males expressing higher levels than females.

This study tested the hypothesis that PR activity during neonatal life is important for sex differences in levels of GABA. To test this hypothesis, male and female rats were treated with either the PR antagonist, RU486 (20 mg/ml) or an equal volume of the oil vehicle from postnatal day t (P1) through P10. Brain tissue was collected at P10, tissue punches taken from the MPN, and proteins extracted. Western blot analysis was used to quantify levels of GAD expression. Data analysis is currently in progress. It is predicted that inhibition of PR activity in males will reduce GAD to levels seen in females, thereby abolishing sex differences in GAD. The PR antagonist should have no effect on GAD levels in females, as females do not express PR in the MPN in the absence of testosterone. These results would suggest that PR activity is one mechanism by which GABA may exert differential effects on neural connectivity in the developing brains of males and females. These findings have implications for understanding the neurodevelopmental mechanisms underlying gender biases in behavioral disorders.


****
Michael Hovish: “Switching Parameters as a Function of Annealing Conditions in HfO2 Resistive Memory Devices (RMD).” Project Advisor: Nathaniel Cady. Nanoscale Science.
Resistive Random Access Memory (ReRAM) has attracted much attention among researchers due to its fast switching speeds [1], lower switching voltages [2], and feasible integration into industry compatible CMOS processing [3]. These characteristics make ReRAM a viable candidate for next-generation Non-Volatile Memory. Transition-Metal-Oxides have been proven to be excellent materials for ReRAM applications [3-5].

We aim to investigate the effect of various, post-deposition anneals (PDA) on the switching parameters of Ni/Cu/HfO2/TiN Resistive Memory Devices (RMD). A Rapid Thermal Anneal (RTA) will be employed to limit diffusion of the bottom electrode into the active layer. We hypothesize that employing a PDA on the HfO2 active layer could result in changed switching parameters of working devices. PDA allows us a mechanism for adjusting the microstructure and quality of the active layer, which in turn could influence switching parameters. We hope that understanding the effect of PDA conditions can lead to not only better devices, but a better understanding of device performance and mechanisms.
****
James Iuliano: “Characterizing the Metastatic Phenotype of Cancer Cells using Nanoscale Lined-Topography.” Project Advisor: Nadine Hempel. Department of Chemistry.
Metastasis represents the most lethal stage in cancer progression, due to difficulties in detection and treatment of metastatic disease. Hence, there is a need for better understanding of the mechanisms that drive metastatic behavior. Cancer cells use the surrounding three-dimensional extracellular matrix (ECM) as chemical cues and physical guides for migration and invasion. In the present study we use a pseudo-three dimensional in vitro platform to differentiate metastatic from the non-metastatic cells. Using nanoscale lines (100nm) patterned on silicon wafer surfaces to mimic the dimensions of collagen fibrils of the ECM, we were able to show that metastatic bladder cancer cells display enhanced alignment and migration along the lined-topography compared to a non-metastatic parental cell line. These data suggest that cancer cells are able to sense and utilize their physical environment, in the form of nanometer-scale structures, to enhance their metastatic behavior.
****
Michael Johnson: “Validation of The Light/Dark Social Avoidance Test Using the Fragile X Mouse Model.” Project Advisor: Lorenz S. Neuwirth. Department of Psychology.
Genetically altered mice are engineered to create Autistic-like models for investigating behavioral end points consistent with human symptoms. Notably, the Autistic-like mouse models target social approach behavior rather than avoidance behavior inconsistent with the Diagnostic Statistical Manual IV DSM-IV) criteria for clinical features of the Autism syndrome. Here we evaluated the Fragile X syndrome KO mouse (FXS KO), a well established model of autism and mental retardation, in a standardized 3 chamber social approach task and contrasted its findings with a novel Light/Dark social avoidance test to best elucidate between these social behavior accuracies in confirming construct validity between tests and mice behavioral effects. In the traditional 3 chamber social approach test FXS KO mice exhibited a reduced time in zone compared with wild type (WT) mice when presented with a stranger mouse, and no difference in time spent with a novel toy. When comparing the familiar mouse with a novel mouse, the FXS KO mice spent more time with the familiar mouse than the novel stranger compared with WT mice, indicating a social deficit in approaching novel conspecific mice. In addition, FXS KO mice spent more time moving away from the novel stranger mouse than WT mice. FXS KO mice also spent more time moving away from the novel mouse when presented with a familiar mouse when compared to WT mice. In the light/dark social avoidance test, interestingly the FXS KO mice exhibited increased time and entries in the light and social zones. Taken together the novel light/dark social avoidance test was validated with the three chamber social approach test but evidenced another way to investigate social behaviors using an intrinsic motivator (i.e. the dark box). This choice system to socialize or avoid may be useful in elucidating how genetic mice with an Autistic-like syndrome behave consistent with DSM-IV criteria for autism.
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