Colonial America Created By: Jodi Stocker, Jenna Doney, Casey Knaust, Jen Schmidt, Ryan Molitor Unit Goals



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Colonial America
Created By: Jodi Stocker, Jenna Doney, Casey Knaust, Jen Schmidt, Ryan Molitor
Unit Goals:

  • Students will be able to interpret maps of the early Colonies.

  • Students will be able to identify the 13 Colonies.

  • Students will know important information about each region of the 13 Colonies: New England, Middle, and Southern.

  • Students will have an understanding of slavery in Colonial America.

  • Students will understand various economic concepts, such as supply and demand, scarcity, and opportunity cost.


Prior Knowledge:

For this unit, students will need a general idea of the components of a map, and idea of who lived in our country before the Europeans came, and which European countries came to North America first and why they came to North America.


Materials:

  • The Nystrom Atlas of Our Country’s History

  • African-Americans in the Thirteen Colonies by Deborah Kent

  • Notebooks

  • Poster boards

  • Access to Library

  • Books over Southern Colonies

  • Paper

  • Pencils

  • Markers

  • Computers with Access to Internet

  • Scissors

  • Social studies textbook (if available)

  • Jigsaw Worksheet

  • Maps

  • Projector

  • Map without key/legend (attached)

  • Map with key/legend (attached)

  • “The Early Colonies” video on DiscoveryEducation.com

  • Interpreting maps handout

  • 13 colonies graphic organizers

  • American Revolution by Mary Pope Osborne and Natalie Pope Boyce

Lesson One: Maps and the 13 Colonies (Anticipatory Set for Unit)


Objectives:

  • Using their atlases, students will read and interpret the maps on pages 22-23 to answer the questions on the handout with at least 80% accuracy.

  •  After reading American Revolution pages 13-35 and watching “The Early Colonies” video, students will work in small groups to fill out a graphic organizer on the thirteen colonies with no more than 2 errors.


Lesson Summary:

In this first lesson in the Colonial America unit using the Nystrom Atlas of Our Country’s History, students will learn how to read the thematic maps and graphs in the atlas. They will then receive an introduction to the thirteen colonies that would become the United States. The students will learn about the thirteen colonies through reading part of American Revolution: A Nonfiction Companion to War on Wednesday, watching a video on DiscoveryEducation.com, and filling out a graphic organizer using the information they learn.
Lesson Two: The New England Colonies
Objectives:

  • Students will use Nystrom Atlas of Our County’s History and read pages 24 to 25 discussing the main focus of our lesson.  They will then answer questions on the handout given.

  • After reading and answering the handout, students will be able to identify all four of the New England Colonies on map, the state they have become, when they were founded and how the Puritans made a living by creating a poster board to present to the class.


Lesson Summary:

In this lesson, using the Nystrom Atlas of Our Country’s History, students will learn about which states were in the New England Colonies.  They will be given an introduction on how there are a total of thirteen colonies, but the focus for the next two days would be on the New England Colonies. 
Lesson Three: The Middle Colonies
Objectives:

  • After a mini-lesson and jigsaw activity, students will write an informational/critical paragraph about the Middle Colonies that satisfies all items on the provided checklist.


Lesson Summary:

In this lesson, students will learn about the Middle Colonies (New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware) through a mini-lesson and through one another. The lesson will start with a short lesson from the teacher about what colonies make up the Middle Colonies and their history. The class will then split up into five groups. Each group will talk about and become “experts” on their topics (four groups learn about the states and one group learns about the religious makeup of the Middle Colonies). After becoming experts, the groups will break up and new groups of six will be created so that the students can teach each other the information that they have learned about their topics. After completing this jigsaw activity, the students will write long paragraphs include important facts about each state, the religious makeup, and a critical statement about the Middle Colonies.


Lesson Four: The Southern Colonies

Objectives:

  • Students will be able to use proper researching skills to explore information over the Southern Colonies to create identification cards for each of the Southern Colonies with 90% accuracy.


Lesson Summary:

During this lesson the students will use their prior knowledge and researching skills to find information as needed over the Southern Colonies. Once the students have gathered their research, they will be put into five (5) groups, one group for each state/colony in the Southern Colonies. Each group will then create an identification card about their state/colony that will include specific information of each. Once each group has completed their task they will take turns presenting their identification cards to their classmates and then put on display on the bulletin board. Students will be assessed on the correct information they’ve provided on their identification cards.


Lesson Five: Slavery in the Colonies
Objectives:

  • In this lesson, students will explain the role scarcity, supply and demand, and opportunity cost through an activity with 85% accuracy. (Comprehension)

  • By the end of the lesson, students will discuss the different jobs slaves worked using the atlas with 90% accuracy. (Evaluation)

  • At the end of this lesson, students will diagram positive and negatives of slavery in the Colonies using creditable internet sources. (Analysis)


Summary:

In this lesson, students will be involved in discussions that revolve around civics, economics and slavery in the thirteen colonies.


Final Project

After the last lesson in the unit, students will complete a group project and an individual essay in place of a unit test. For the project, students will have a choice between writing a poem, creating a commercial, writing a brochure, or creating a billboard. These items will be designed to persuade others to move to the region that they are assigned. Students will work in their groups to make a thematic map for their region as well. For the individual essay, students will compare and contrast two colonial regions and explain which they would choose to live in and why. In a second part of the essay, the students will explain why the colonists used slaves.


Group Advertising Project:
Choice Board:


Commercial Skit: Write a commercial advertising your region and act it out in class.

Poem:

Write a persuasive poem about your region and recite it to the class.






Billboard:

Create a billboard advertising your region and present it to the class.



Brochure:

Create a brochure advertising your region and present it to the class.




Content Checklist:

In their poem, commercial, brochure, or billboard, students should have included and/or given details about each item on this list as it pertains to their assigned colonial region.




The names of all colonies in that region




Common religions in those colonies




Common occupations in those colonies




Natural environment of that region




Natural resources of that region




Country of origin of most of their colonies population




Groups of people in those colonies




Group addressed the use of slavery in their region.




At least 3 facts about the way of life of the people in their colonial region





Rubric:


Category

3

2

1

0


Content

The student and his/her group included all required content.

The student and his/her group included most required content.

The student and his/her group included some required content.

The student and his/her group included none of the required content.


Accuracy

All of the information about the group’s colonial region is accurate.

Most of the information about the group’s colonial region is accurate.

Some of the information about the group’s colonial region is accurate.

None of the information about the group’s colonial region is accurate.


Presentation

The project is very creative and persuasive.

The project is somewhat persuasive and creative.

The project is creative, but not persuasive.

The project is not creative or persuasive.


Organization


The project is very neat and organized.

The project is mostly neat and organized.

The project is somewhat neat and organized.

The project is not neat and organized.



Cooperation

The student received at least 6 out of 7 points on the observational checklist.

The student received 4-5 points on the observational checklist.

The student received 2-3 points on the observational checklist.

The student received 0-1 points on the observational checklist.


Effort

All of the student's work reflects his/ her best effort.


Most of the student’s work reflects his/her best effort.

Some of the student’s work reflects his/her best effort.

None of the student’s work reflects his/her best effort.


Map Rubric:

Working with their small group, students will create a thematic map that uses symbols to represent at least 3 facts (e.g. religion, population density, ethnicity, forts, etc.) about their assigned region of the colonies (New England, Middle, and Southern) and will receive at least a 6 out of 7 on the checklist.



Map has a title.

 

 


Students displayed all colonies in their group's assigned region.

 

 


Colonies are labeled.

 

 


Map is colored.

 

 


Group included symbols representing at least 3 facts about the colonies in their assigned region (e.g. population density, natural resources, religions, etc.).

 

Map contains a legend that explains all symbols used on map.

 

Map is neat and creative and demonstrates the group’s best work.

 





Group Roles:

Leader: _____________

Secretary: _____________

Task Manager: ______________

Lead Designer: ______________
Observation Checklist:



Names

Stays on task

Comm. with group members

Cooperation

With group members



Shows

progress


Shows

creativity



Uses time wisely

Problem solving

TOTAL POINTS EARNED




















































































Compare and Contrast Critical Essay:
Rubric:





Firm Understanding

5 pts

Understanding

4 pts

Understands the Basics

3 pts

Limited Understanding

2pts

Content

Student explained which colonies used slaves, compared and contrasted two colonies, chose which colony they would live in and explained why using at least three reasons.

Student explained which colonies used slaves and compared and contrasted two colonies.

Student explained which colonies used slaves and picked where they would live and explained why.

Student explained which states used slaves.

Work Quality

Student has at least two pages written about the colonies.

Student has at least one and half pages written about the colonies.

Student has at least a page written about the colonies.

Student has less than a page written about the colonies.

Visual

Student has a Venn diagram with at least ten facts total inside of it.

Student has a Venn diagram with at least eight facts total inside of it.

Student has a Venn diagram with at least six facts total inside of it.

Student has a Venn diagram with five or less facts inside of it.



Lesson 1: The 13 Colonies
Prepared by: Jenna Doney Grade: 5th
Subject: Social Studies/Geography
Standards:


  • GLEs

    • 5.SS.Geog.5.A Reading and constructing maps: Use geographic research sources to acquire information and answer questions

    • 5.SS.Geog.5.C Understanding the concept of place: Identify human characteristics, such as people’s education, language, diversity, economies, religions, settlement patterns, ethnic background and political system

    • 5.SS.Geog.5.H Human Systems: Identify major patterns of population distribution, demographics and migrations in the United States

  • Common Core

    • Literacy.RI.5.7 Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Using their atlases, students will read and interpret the maps on pages 22-23 to answer the questions on the handout with at least 80% accuracy.

  2. After reading American Revolution pages 13-35 and watching “The Early Colonies” video, students will work in small groups to fill out a graphic organizer on the thirteen colonies with no more than 2 errors.

Level of Thinking:

  1. DOK: 1

  2. Bloom’s Taxonomy: This lesson is at a comprehension level of thinking according to Bloom’s Taxonomy, because students will use their understanding of maps and the information they learn from reading the maps and a book as well as from watching a video to complete the lesson’s activities.

Teacher Materials:

  • Computer

  • Projector

  • Map without key/legend (attached)

  • Map with key/legend (attached)

  • “The Early Colonies” video on DiscoveryEducation.com

  • Interpreting maps handout

  • 13 colonies graphic organizers


Student Materials:

  • The Nystrom Atlas of Our Country’s History

  • American Revolution by Mary Pope Osborne and Natalie Pope Boyce

  • Pencil

  • Journal


Phase 1: Hook

  • Display the Pop vs. Soda map with its title and key hidden. Have students try to infer what the map is saying.

Phase 2: Activating Prior Knowledge & Clarifying Goals

  • As a class, have the students brainstorm the types of maps and parts of maps that they know. Make a list on the board. Explain that during this lesson, they will be learning about thematic maps and then use thematic maps to learn about the colonists.

  • Ask students what colonies are and why the colonists moved from Europe to North America.

  • Explain that during this lesson students will learn about the colonies that would eventually become the United States through reading a book, watching a video, and reading maps in their atlas.

  • Give the lesson’s objectives.

Phase 3: Discussion & Guided Practice

  • Display the Pop vs. Soda map from the hook with its key and title. Discuss with the students what the map is communicating and how its creator presented the information.

  • Define thematic maps and show a few examples.

  • Have students turn in their atlases to pages 6-7 entitled “How Does This Atlas Work?” Read over those pages with the students. Explain how to read thematic maps and how to use the maps, graphs, charts, pictures, etc. in the atlas to gain information.

Phase 4: Independent Practice

  • Pass out the Interpreting Thematic Maps handout, read the directions with the students, and give your expectations.

  • Have the students complete the handout.

  • As students work, write on the board the instructions that when they finish, they should take out their American Revolution books and read pages 13-35.

  • Give the students time to finish their reading after they finish the map handout. When most have finished, play the “The Early Colonies” DiscoveryEducation.com video.

  • Pass out the 13 Colonies graphic organizer and discuss the instructions for the assignment.

  • Place students in small groups to complete the graphic organizer. Have them work.

Phase 5: Self-Assessment & Closure

  • Bring the students back together as a whole class. Have each group share the information they wrote in one of the boxes on the graphic organizer.

  • In their journals, have students write:

  1. One thing they did well while working with the group

  2. One way they can improve how they work in groups for next time

  3. One thing they learned about the colonists from the lesson

  4. One “I wonder” statement about the colonists that they hope to learn in future lessons

Modification/Differentiation of Instruction:

  • Allow ELL students to work with a partner on the interpreting maps activity and reading the pages in American Revolution.

  • Place students in mixed-ability groups for the 13 Colonies graphic organizer activity.

  • Provide low level readers with a concise document at their reading level that contains the necessary information for completing the graphic organizer.

  • Challenge advanced students to create a thematic map representing one of the facts they learn from reading the assigned pages in American Revolution.

Assessment:

  • The students will be formatively assessed through the Interpreting Thematic Maps handout and the 13 colonies graphic organizer.

Name:__________________________________


Interpreting Thematic Maps

Directions: Use the maps, graphs, and other information on pages 22-23 in The Nystrom Atlas of Our Country’s History to answer the questions below. The answers do not need to be in complete sentences.


  1. What year was the North Carolina colony founded?




  1. Which colony had the largest population of white people?




  1. Which colonies make up the New England colonies?



  1. How many middle colonies are there?




  1. Look on page 23 at map C called “The Colonists from Many Nations.” Which colony had the largest population of Scots?



  1. Which ethnic group had the largest population in the colonies?




  1. Which mountain range was near the original 13 colonies?




  1. What are the 4 colonies that had Baptist colonists?




  1. Which colonies had a policy of religious tolerance?



  1. Which colony had the largest population of African slaves?

Bonus: Look at “B” on page 22. Which region had the most people? Why do you think that region had the most people?


Group Members:_________________________________________________________


The 13 Colonies that Became the United States

Directions: Work with your group to complete the graphic organizer below. Place at least 3 facts in each box about that category. You do not need to be write in complete sentences.


The Original13 Colonies

Other Important Facts

The Daily Life of the Colonists

Reasons the Colonists Prospered

Occupations in the Colonies

Reasons the Colonists Came to America

Groups of People in the Colonies



Lesson 2: The New England Colonies
Prepared by: Casey Knaust Grade: 5th
Subject: Social Studies
Objectives:

  • Students will use Nystrom Atlas of Our County’s History and read pages 24 to 25 discussing the main focus of our lesson.  They will then answer questions on the handout given.

  • After reading and answering the handout, students will be able to identify all four of the New England Colonies on map, the state they have become, when they were founded and how the Puritans made a living by creating a poster board to present to the class.


GLE’s:

  • 5.SS.Hist.3a.C Discovery, Exploration and Settlement of the United States: Outline the discovery, exploration and early settlement of America.


Materials:

  • The Nystrom Atlas of Our Country’s History(pages 24-25)

  • Computers

  • Pencils

  • Notebooks

  • Poster boards

  • Markers

  • Scissors

  • Maps


Phase 1

  • Introduce the students to the New England Colonies. Put up a map of where they are located and briefly go over it.


Phase 2

  • Explain that during the next few days we will be discussing the New England Colonies and they will learn something new about each of them as the lesson goes on.

  • Give a brief description of how the days will be ran and what their jobs will consist of.


Phase 3

  • Have students open their atlas books to pages 24 and 25 to read quietly about the colonies.

  • Come back together as a class and discuss what was read and how we will use this to work in groups.


Phase 4

  • Introduce the students to their group members.

  • In their journals, have them summarize what they read about and what they want to learn about their colony.

  • Have the students get with their group members and start working in the centers.


Phase 5

  • Bring the students back together to discuss where they are with their projects and what extra information or materials they will need to finish their project.

  • In their journals have the students write

    • What they accomplished today in centers.

    • What they need to accomplish tomorrow in centers

    • How many more days they think they will need to make sure they receive an A

    • Any extra books or sources they think they need to help them with this project.


Modifications:

For students who seem to struggle with Social Studies, I will make sure to pair them in a group with at least one very strong student and at least one student who is average to strong. If they need extra help I will have handouts available for them to attach in their journals to help them stay on track for what information they should look for.



Lesson 3: The Middle Colonies
Prepared by: Jodi Stocker Grade: 5th
Subject: Social Studies
Objective:

  • Following a mini-lesson and a jigsaw activity, students will write an informational/critical paragraph about the Middle Colonies that satisfies all items on the provided checklist.


Standards:

  • GLEs

    • SS3 1.8 Outline the discovery, exploration, and early settlement of America.

  • Common Core

    • SL.5.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

      • A Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.

      • D Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained from the discussions.


Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy:

  • Understanding: Students will recall and discuss important facts about the Middle Colonies. (Factual Knowledge)

  • Applying: Students will use the information that they have learned about the Middle Colonies to write a factual/critical paragraph. (Factual Knowledge)


Materials:

  • The Nystrom Atlas of Our Country’s History

  • Social studies textbook (if available)

  • Jigsaw worksheet

  • Notebooks

  • Paper

  • Pencils


Phase 1: Clarify Goals and Establish Set

  • Explain to the students that they will continue to use their Nystrom Atlases today to learn about a new region of the 13 Colonies: The Middle Colonies.

  • Explain to the class that after a short lesson about the states in the Middle Colonies, they will be working in jigsaw groups to learn more about each part of the this region and become experts. When they finish teaching each other, they will be writing a paragraph about what they have learned.


Phase 2: Present Information

  • Ask the students to turn to page 26 of their Atlases. Have one student name the colonies that make up the Middle Colonies.

  • Explain to the class that these colonies were first settled by people from the Netherlands and Sweden. Even after the English took over the Middle Colonies, the Dutch still outnumbered the English in New York and New Jersey.

  • Explain that they will be teaching each other about these colonies today.


Phase 3: Organize Students into Learning Teams

  • Split the students into mixed-ability groups as follows:

  1. New York

    1. Land use and implications, important cities, and populations

  2. Pennsylvania

    1. Land use and implications, important cities, and populations

  3. New Jersey

    1. Land use and implications, important cities, and populations

  4. Delaware

    1. Land use and implications, important cities, and populations

  5. Religious Makeup

    1. How was it different from other colonial regions? Did they have religious tolerance? Why is this important?

  • The student groups will use their Atlases, textbooks, and any other resources the teacher may find useful to answer the questions and become experts. Give the students the Jigsaw worksheets to write down the answers to these questions and any other important information for when they need to teach their topics.

  • Arrange the students into new groups once they have become experts on their topics. Each new groups should have the following members:

  1. New York Expert

  2. Pennsylvania Expert

  3. New Jersey Expert

  4. Delaware Expert

  5. Religious Makeup Expert

  • In the new groups, the students will teacher each other about their topics. Encourage students to take notes in their notebooks. After teaching each other about their topics, their groups should consider the following questions:

  1. What made these colonies different from the New England Colonies and the Southern Colonies?

  2. What kind of people would have moved to this region?

  3. What made this region important to the rest of the Colonies and to England?

  • Students should make notes about the answers to these questions in their notebooks.


Phase 4: Test for Understanding

  • Have the students disperse and return to their seats.

  • Explain that they will now write their paragraphs about what they have learned. They should write about each colony in the region and make a critical statement about the region (i.e. Would you want to live here? Was this region important?). Provide the students with the following checklist, which will be used to grade the paragraphs:


Middle Colonies Paragraph

Yes No

Does my paragraph discuss each

colony? ____ ____

Does my paragraph discuss the

religious makeup of the Middle

Colonies? ____ ____

Do I make a critical statement about

the Middle Colonies? ____ ____


Phase 5: Closure

  • Ask the students what they have learned about the Middle Colonies. Allow several students to talk.

  • Explain that they will need to keep the Middle Colonies in mind as they learn about the rest of the 13 Colonies.


Differentiated Learning:

  • Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders or other Social Impairments: Group work can be difficult for many students who are on the autism spectrum or who have other difficulties with working with peers. However, it is very important that these students are still a part of group work. Make group member decisions carefully for these students. If a student is non-verbal or has other difficulties with speech, they may be able to use an AT device to speak. If this is not a successful option, pairing the student with another student when switching into the teaching groups would allow the student to still take part in the jigsaw activity.

Group Members:________________________________________


Jigsaw Learning

Use the graphic organizer to take notes about your Jigsaw Group Topic.



Topic


Lesson 4: The Southern Colonies
Prepared by: Jen Schmidt Grade: 5th
Objective(s):

  1. Students will be able to use proper researching skills to explore information over the Southern Colonies to create identification cards for each of the 5 colonies; Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia with 90% accuracy.


GLEs:

5.SS.Hist.3a.C Discovery, Exploration and Settlement of the United States: Outline the discovery, exploration and early settlement of America.

5.SS.Hist.3a.F Westward Expansion and Settlement in the US: Examine cultural interaction among these groups from colonial times to Civil War.
Materials:


  • Access to library

  • Books over Southern Colonies

  • Paper

  • Pencil

  • Markers

  • Internet access

  • Scissors


Phase 1: Clarify Goals and Establish Set

  • Tell students that they are going to continue to study the 13 Original Colonies but now they will be exploring them more in depth.

  • The students will study the Southern Colonies and design identification cards for each of the states within the Southern Colonies.

  • ID cards need to include:

  • name of state

  • farming

  • making and selling

  • natural resources

  • religion

  • slaves

  • capital

  • towns

  • forts

  • date founded

  • settlers

  • picture of colony

Vocabulary words:

  • plantations

  • Anglican

  • Settlers

  • Crop

  • Agriculture


Phase 2: Present Information and Organize Students into Learning Teams

  • Students will break up into five (5) groups

  • Assign a colony to each group

  • Research colony

  • Create ID card

  • Present to class


Phase 3: Closure and Testing for Understanding

  • Each group will have one (1) identification card, total, per group, to present to the class on what they found/learned during their research over their colony.


Phase 4: Provide Recognition

  • The students' identification cards will be placed on the bulletin board.


Assessment:

Each group will present their identification card for their colony to the class with correct use of information about the colony.


Differentiation:

For ESL students the instructions can be interpreted in their language or their will be copies of the worksheets available to them in their language if needed.



Lesson 5: Slavery in the Colonies
Prepared by: Ryan Molitor Grade: 5th
Subject: Social Studies
Time Span: 5-6 days (more time will be allotted if necessary)
Goal:

  • To have students make logical connections of where economics and civics played a major part in the early years of the Thirteen Colonies and slavery.


Objective(s):

  • In this lesson, students will explain the role scarcity, supply and demand, and opportunity cost through an activity with 85% accuracy. (Comprehension)

  • By the end of the lesson, students will discuss the different jobs slaves worked using the atlas with 90% accuracy. (Evaluation)

  • At the end of this lesson, students will diagram positive and negatives of slavery in the Colonies using creditable internet sources. (Analysis)


Standards:

  • GLE’s

    • Economics GLEs

      • 5.SS.Econ.4.A Knowledge of basic economic concepts, being able to explain and use them to interpret historical and current events: Apply the following economic concepts:

        1. Scarcity

        2. Supply and demand

        3. Trade-offs (opportunity cost)

    • Civics GLEs

      • 5.SS.Relations.I Changing ideas, concepts and traditions: Identify how ideas, concepts and traditions have changed over time in the United States

  • Common Core

  • Literacy.RI.5.7 Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently

  • Literacy.W.5.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.


Materials:

  • The Nystrom Atlas of Our Country’s History by National Geographic

  • African-Americans in the Thirteen Colonies by Deborah Kent

  • Writing journal

  • Poster paper


Phase 1: Establish Set

  • Students will engage in grand conversation

  • Topics might include

    • What they know about the original Colonies

    • What they know about slaves

    • What were types of jobs during this time period

    • What is supply?

    • What is demand?

    • What is scarcity?

Phase 2: Focus the Discussion

  • Ask students to get out their writing journals

  • Explain and review the goal of this lesson

  • Students will then create a KWL in their journal

    • Have students fill out what they know

    • Have students fill out what they want to know

    • This chart can be used for any of the topics

    • Hand out multiple charts if necessary

  • Inform the class that this is group work

Phase 3: Hold the discussion

  • Go over the rules for group discussion and group work

  • Students will be put into assigned groups

  • Have students chose roles (reader, writer, researcher, presenter)

  • Each group will be responsible for reading African-Americans in the Thirteen Colonies

  • Reference The Nystrom Atlas of Our Country’s History for additional information

  • Have writer write down details from the story

    • Review plagiarism

  • Get ready to share to class

Phase 4: End Discussion

  • Each group will create a poster

    • Things to include

      • Slave jobs

      • Living quarters

      • Rights

      • Positives and Negatives of slavery (from both sides)

  • Once their poster is completed have students share to class

  • Once every group has shared, hang the posters up

  • Congratulate everyone for their hard work

Phase 5: Debrief the Discussion

  • Explain what the Thirteen Colonies, mainly the Southern Colonies, needed slaves for

  • Ask questions:

    • Did you like this lesson? Why or why not?

    • Would you include any other books? Which ones?

    • Did you find anything interesting that you would like to share?

Other Activities: Find a webquest for students on slavery
Modifications: For students with difficulty reading, provide the books on tape for them to follow along to. Students who have difficulty writing may type their work into a word document. For ELL students, pair them into a group with students that have high comprehension levels and can help explain the texts easily.


What I Know


What I Wonder

(or want to know)



What I have Learned









Group Roles: No one should be in the same role more than twice. Each group member should be in a role at least once during this project.
Reader: _____________

Description: The reader will be chosen to read the selected texts aloud to their other group members. If the group decides to have everyone read a part of the stories, write everyone’s names down.

Writer: _____________

Description: The writer will be the one putting notes on a piece of paper, documenting what information the group believes is relevant, etc.

Artist: ______________

Description: The artist will be the one who draws on the poster (if they choose to draw), if not they will be the one finding images to place on the poster for the group.

Researcher: ______________

Description: This group member will be working closely with the writer on determining what information is the best for their poster. This job might include, reading the texts over again, online research, etc.




Jodi Stocker, Jenna Doney, Casey Knaust, Jen Schmidt, Ryan Molitor,

University of Missouri-St. Louis





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