Collection 1 Multiple Choice



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Collection 1
Multiple Choice

Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.
Reading and Literary Analysis
Directions: Read the passage below, and answer the following questions.





SAMPLE




The ancient city of Tenochtitlán in Mexico was the capital of the Aztec Empire. The city was built on a five-square-mile island surrounded by Lake Texcoco and connected to the mainland by three man-made causeways.




Tenochtitlán was one of the most advanced cities of its time. The streets were laid out in a grid pattern. Many of these streets were canals in which inhabitants traveled by canoe. Sophisticated aqueducts brought fresh water into the city. Barges collected waste, which was then turned into fertilizer. Floating gardens along the island’s shoreline supplied not only beauty but extra space for growing food. In 1500, the city’s population reached 300,000, making it larger than any city in Europe.




1. This selection can best be described as —

A. fictional

B. poetic

C. biographical

D. informational

Correct answer: D




2. The argument that Tenochtitlán was one of the most advanced cities of its time is supported by all the following facts except that —

A. the city was built on a large island

B. the streets were laid out in a grid pattern

C. causeways connected the city to the mainland

D. aqueducts delivered fresh water to the city

Correct answer: A


Reading and Literary Analysis
Directions: Read the passage, and answer the following questions.


Fall







Somber hue diffused on everything.

Each creature, each emptied corn stalk,

is richly bundled in mellow light.

In that open unharvested field of my own life,

5 I have fathered small joys and memories.

My heart was once a lover’s swing that creaked in wind

of these calm fall days.

Autumn chants my visions to sleep,

and travels me back into a night

10 when I could touch stars and believe in myself . . .




Along the way, grief broke me,

my faith became hardened dirt

walked over by too many people.

My heart now, as I walk down this dirt road,

15 on this calm fall day,

is a dented

tin bucket

filled with fruits

picked long ago.

20 It’s getting harder

to lug the heavy bucket.

I spill a memory on the ground,

it gleams,

rain on hot embers

25 of yellow grass.

—Jimmy Santiago Baca



“Fall” from Black Mesa Poems by Jimmy Santiago Baca. Copyright © 1989 by Jimmy Santiago Baca. Reproduced by permission of New Directions Publishing Corporation.


____ 1. The poem’s lack of rhyme indicates that it is —

a.

an allegory

c.

lyrical

b.

pastoral

d.

free verse

____ 2. Besides referring to a time of year, the poem’s title may also be an allusion to the Biblical story of Adam and Eve and the archetype of —



a.

a lost promised land

c.

disobedience to authority

b.

how the mighty fall

d.

betrayal of promises made

____ 3. Baca uses a field in line 4 as a symbol of —



a.

his reputation as a poet

c.

the sadness of the seasons

b.

dangers to the environment

d.

the speaker’s life experiences

____ 4. The phrase “unharvested field of my own life” in line 4 supports the speaker’s view that —



a.

he was unable to pick the crops he’d planted

b.

his life didn’t turn out as he anticipated

c.

life is always a struggle and a disappointment

d.

you should always finish tasks you’ve begun

____ 5. The comparison of the speaker’s heart to “a lover’s swing” in line 6 expresses the speaker’s —



a.

love of swinging in the wind

c.

youthful hopes and dreams

b.

romantic disappointments

d.

inability to succeed in life

____ 6. “Autumn chants my visions to sleep” in line 8 is an example of which literary device?



a.

metaphor

c.

simile

b.

personification

d.

alliteration

____ 7. The poem’s message that life doesn’t always live up to its promises is supported by its —



a.

rhyme sequence

c.

sad, quiet mood

b.

alliteration

d.

use of short lines

____ 8. The metaphor “My heart . . . / is a dented / tin bucket” is most likely used to evoke in readers feelings of —



a.

disappointment

c.

scorn

b.

affection

d.

sympathy

____ 9. What can you infer that the speaker in “Fall” feels he has lost?



a.

his ability to write

c.

his unpleasant memories

b.

his hope and confidence

d.

his fear of facing life

____ 10. The poem’s sense of disappointment grows out of a belief that —



a.

life can be joyous and successful

c.

people are often thoughtless and cruel

b.

life is nasty, brutish, and short

d.

nothing good will ever happen

____ 11. What has happened to the speaker’s faith?



a.

It has been damaged over time.

c.

It has been replaced by doubt.

b.

It has been renewed.

d.

It has remained steadfast.

____ 12. “Fall” exhibits all the following characteristics of postmodern literature except



a.

it comments upon itself

c.

it allows for multiple meanings

b.

it is intensely personal

d.

it uses a nontraditional structure



Reading and Literary Analysis
Directions: Read the passage below, and answer the following questions.
First Fight for Freedom of the Press
William Cosby, the governor of New York in the 1730s, thought he had put an end to the editorials that criticized him when he jailed John Peter Zenger, a newspaper publisher. But the governor had discounted the tenacity of Zenger’s wife. While caring for her family, Anna Zenger went on publishing the paper every week for the more than eight months her husband was in jail.
Cosby, who was related by marriage to English royalty, had arrived in the colony of New York in 1731 to assume the job of governor. Few historians since the 1700s have said a good word about Governor Cosby. He was an autocratic governor who tried to use the courts to enforce his will. When courts ruled against him, Cosby arranged for trials with no juries or handpicked the judges himself. He simply replaced the judges who stood in his way. He controlled the press and made sure that it always praised him.
Cosby’s critics encouraged the Zengers to start a newspaper—the New York Weekly Journal—to expose Cosby’s misdeeds. The Journal began to publish satirical criticisms of Cosby in editorials and advertisements. Although Zenger did not personally write the criticisms, they expressed his viewpoint, and he was willing to shield the people who wrote them. Cosby became very upset and had charges brought against Zenger for “seditious libel,” that is, harmful statements that promote revolt against the government.
Cosby saw to it that bail was set so high that neither Zenger nor his supporters could pay it. While in jail, Zenger began to write letters criticizing Cosby. Refusing to be intimidated, his wife published the letters in their newspaper, where they reached a sympathetic audience.
In 1735, Zenger’s trial began. Andrew Hamilton, a famous lawyer from Philadelphia, defended him. Cosby tried unsuccessfully to stack the jury with his supporters. Ironically, English law decreed that the greater the truth published in criticizing someone, the greater the libel. However, Zenger’s lawyer persuaded the jury to ignore the English law and to agree that if what one publishes about a public servant is true, it is not libel. Zenger was acquitted by the jury and went home to resume publishing the Journal.
The verdict did not change British law or the English definition of libel. From that point on, however, only a foolhardy political leader would charge critics with libel. Satire of leaders became much more common. Journalists buzzed like angry bees around corrupt officials, stinging them with impunity. Thus, although the verdict had little immediate legal effect, the Zengers’ brave actions helped lay the groundwork for freedom of the press in the United States.
____ 13. The writer makes this historic account clear by telling it —

a.

as if it is happening today

c.

in a long flashback

b.

in a logical sequence

d.

from different perspectives

____ 14. In what way might this passage be biased?



a.

In favor of the legal system

c.

In favor of Governor Cosby

b.

In favor of the Zengers

d.

In favor of the British

____ 15. The editorials in the Journal expressed —



a.

the will of the government

c.

untruths about officials

b.

the need for conformity

d.

opinions on public issues

____ 16. This account makes it clear that satire can be used to —



a.

win a court case

c.

defend oneself from libel

b.

disguise one’s intended meaning

d.

expose the flaws of one’s opponents

____ 17. What quotation from the passage best reveals John Peter Zenger’s steadfast character?



a.

“Cosby’s critics encouraged the Zengers to start a newspaper.”

b.

“He was willing to shield the people who wrote them.”

c.

“Zenger was acquitted by the jury and went home.”

d.

“Satire of leaders became much more common.”

____ 18. What was the main argument of Zenger’s defense?



a.

If what is published is true, then it cannot be considered libel.

b.

Publishers in the colonies should not have to obey British law.

c.

Because Zenger did not write the criticisms, he is innocent.

d.

Libel is not serious enough to warrant time in jail.

____ 19. This account best supports the author’s belief in the —



a.

importance of freedom of the press

b.

necessity of supporting one’s friends

c.

value of our country’s newspaper editors

d.

power of a successful and loving marriage

____ 20. This account mentions that, in the 1730s, many New York judges were —



a.

willing to challenge corrupt leaders

c.

controlled by the governor

b.

intimidated by the English throne

d.

making plans to revolt

____ 21. In this passage, the author stresses that freedom of the press —



a.

helped newspapers sell more papers

c.

helped prisoners gain their freedom

b.

gave political leaders greater control

d.

helped keep political leaders accountable

____ 22. The word autocrat is from Greek roots meaning “power” and —



a.

car

c.

self

b.

office

d.

king

____ 23. The word impunity comes from the Latin roots meaning —



a.

“not” and “pretty”

c.

“toward” and “pain”

b.

“inner” and “peace”

d.

“without” and “punishment”



Reading and Literary Analysis
Directions: Read the passage below, and answer the following questions.
The Bill of Rights
The First Ten Amendments to the Constitution as

Ratified by the States
Amendment I

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.


Amendment II

A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.


Amendment III

No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in any house, without the consent of the owner; nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.


Amendment IV

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated; and no warrants shall issue but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.


Amendment V

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the militia, when in actual service in time of war or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself; nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use without just compensation.


Amendment VI

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the state and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of counsel for his defense.


Amendment VII

In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury shall be otherwise re-examined in any court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.


Amendment VIII

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.


Amendment IX

The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.


Amendment X

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.


____ 24. In the Bill of Rights, the ten amendments —

a.

each address a particular concern

c.

are concerned with court matters

b.

follow a cause-and-effect order

d.

are steps in a legal process

____ 25. An implicit assumption behind the Bill of Rights is —



a.

federal and state laws should be distinguished

b.

crimes and other violations must be prevented

c.

the rights of individual citizens should be protected

d.

that all people should be treated equally

____ 26. One can infer from Amendment III that at one time —



a.

colonists had to provide food and shelter to British soldiers

b.

officials searched houses without probable cause

c.

governments established an official religion

d.

people had been tried twice for the same offense

____ 27. How might Amendment V best be summarized?



a.

Amendment V protects the rights of accused persons.

b.

Amendment V protects property owners’ rights.

c.

Amendment V protects the rights of individuals.

d.

Amendment V protects the rights of free speech.

____ 28. Which of the following would most likely violate Amendment VIII?



a.

Religious icons are displayed at city hall.

b.

Bail is set at ten thousand dollars for someone accused of speeding.

c.

A shoplifting trial is delayed for two years.

d.

A person is sent to prison without being given a court trial.

____ 29. Amendment IX addresses people’s concerns by —



a.

explaining to people exactly what rights they have

b.

assuring people they retain rights not mentioned

c.

denying powers to the federal government

d.

disparaging the rights retained by the people

____ 30. Which amendment expresses beliefs shared by both the authors of the Bill of Rights and the Zengers (in “First Fight for Freedom of the Press”)?



a.

Amendment I

c.

Amendment IV

b.

Amendment III

d.

Amendment VI



Vocabulary
Directions: Choose the word that means the same, or about the same, as the underlined word. Then, mark the answer you have chosen.



SAMPLE




Something that is temporal is—

A. invisible

B. temporary

C. fragrant

D. disorderly

Correct answer: B

____ 31. Something that is intimated is —



a.

hinted

c.

requested

b.

announced

d.

provided

____ 32. Precarious means —



a.

attentive

c.

uncertain

b.

uniform

d.

essential

____ 33. An encumbrance is a —



a.

compliment

c.

rebellion

b.

decoration

d.

burden

____ 34. Someone who is lucid is —



a.

immoral

c.

inefficient

b.

drowsy

d.

clearheaded

____ 35. Avarice is another word for —



a.

greed

c.

modesty

b.

deceit

d.

determination

____ 36. Something that is ludicrous is —



a.

implied

c.

impatient

b.

absurd

d.

sorrowful

____ 37. Rigorous training is —



a.

severe

c.

wasteful

b.

calming

d.

dangerous

____ 38. A plaintive cry is —



a.

old-fashioned

c.

restrained

b.

irritating

d.

sad

____ 39. Temerity means —



a.

boldness

c.

honesty

b.

pleasure

d.

curiosity

____ 40. A rendezvous is a(n) —



a.

celebration

c.

meeting

b.

hideaway

d.

secret

Collection 1

Answer Section
MULTIPLE CHOICE
1. ANS: D PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.1.11.7 (free verse)
2. ANS: A PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.1.9.13 (figurative language / figures of speech)
3. ANS: D PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.1.9.37 (symbolism)
4. ANS: B PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading / comprehension)
5. ANS: C PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading / comprehension)
6. ANS: B PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.1.9 (stylistic devices and literary elements)
7. ANS: C PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading / comprehension)
8. ANS: D PTS: 1

OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.9.22 (metaphor)


9. ANS: B PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.2.1.8 (making inferences)
10. ANS: A PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading / comprehension)
11. ANS: A PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading / comprehension)
12. ANS: A PTS: 1

OBJ: 11.1.6 (Evaluate genres and styles particular to a literary tradition.)


13. ANS: B PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.2.1.11 (recognizing patterns of organization)
14. ANS: B PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.2.1.22 (identifying the writer's stance)
15. ANS: D PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading / comprehension)
16. ANS: D PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading / comprehension)
17. ANS: B PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading / comprehension)
18. ANS: A PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.2.1.14 (analyzing persuasion / arguments)
19. ANS: A PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.2.1.9 (identifying the main idea)
20. ANS: C PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading / comprehension)
21. ANS: D PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading / comprehension)
22. ANS: C PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.3.4 (denotation and connotation)
23. ANS: D PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.3.4 (denotation and connotation)
24. ANS: A PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading / comprehension)
25. ANS: C PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.2.1.8 (making inferences)
26. ANS: A PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.2.1.8 (making inferences)
27. ANS: A PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.2.1.23 (summarizing)
28. ANS: B PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.2.1.28 (drawing conclusions)
29. ANS: B PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading / comprehension)
30. ANS: A PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading / comprehension)
31. ANS: A PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.3.10 (synonyms)
32. ANS: C PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.3.10 (synonyms)
33. ANS: D PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.3.10 (synonyms)
34. ANS: D PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.3.10 (synonyms)
35. ANS: A PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.3.10 (synonyms)
36. ANS: B PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.3.10 (synonyms)
37. ANS: A PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.3.10 (synonyms)
38. ANS: D PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.3.10 (synonyms)
39. ANS: A PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.3.10 (synonyms)
40. ANS: C PTS: 1 OBJ: 11.3.10 (synonyms)


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