Clayton State University Academic Conference April 6, 2012



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GRACIE'S CLOSET

Payal Patel, Jade Tate, Beverly Gomez & Keshra Blackman

Faculty Advisor: Beverly Wright

College of Business, Department of Marketing, Management, and Supply Chain

Abstract:

In 1986, a group of Fayette County citizens recognized the need to protect abused and neglected children by providing a safe haven for them.One of the organization's active services is Gracie’s Closet (GC).GC provides foster care children residing in south metro Atlanta with free clothing, baby gear, books, and school supplies. Items are either new or gently used.The mission of GC is to help foster children feel special by providing items they need.Our team was offered an excellent opportunity to conduct research on behalf of GC.This presentation will focus on the basic findings from the survey and the advance analysis of hypotheses.These research findings are being used to assist GC with their fund raising efforts for the organization.



On new bounds for the monophonic number of Cartesian products of graphs

Michael Ngo

Faculty Advisor: Elliot Krop

College of Information and Mathematical Sciences, Department of Mathematics

Abstract:

Given two vertices u,v in a graph G, a chordless path from u to v is also known as a monophonic path. Let JG[u,v] be the monophonic closed interval consisting of all vertices on all monophonic paths from u to v. For any subset of S of vertices of G, let JG[S] be the set of all monophonic intervals for every pair of vertices from S. A set S is called a monophonic set of G if JG[S] is the set of all vertices in G. The minimum cardinality of S, for all S subsets of vertices of G, so that JG[S] is a monophonic set, is called the monophonic number of G and is denoted mn(G). Finally, we mention some open problems in the subject. This talk will be self-contained and aimed at a general audience.



Implementation of UGAMP: A User Guided Adaptive Music Player

Christa Phillips & Christine Gardner

Faculty Advisor: Byron Jeff

College of Information and Mathematical Sciences, Department of Information Technology

Abstract:

It is difficult to manage large music collections. Often uneven song selection with repetitive and skipped songs occur. To resolve this, a new algorithm does a true random shuffle using best RNG practices. Each song plays only one time per cycle with reshuffles between each cycle. Users load songs in groups. A user may not prefer every song in the group, forcing evaluation of each song for deletion. Instead, UGAMP records the ratio of the listening time compared to the actual length of the song. A decision to play or skip songs is based on this trending ratio. Liked songs can be "Super Played" more than once per cycle with an even distribution. UGAMP will run on the Motorola Xoom using Scripting Layer for Android development environment.



On Some Relations Between Chemical Indices On Trees

Marcus Bartlett

Faculty Advisor: Elliot Krop

College of Information and Mathematical Sciences, Department of Mathematics

Abstract:

The Wiener index of a graph G is defined to be the sum of distances between every pair of vertices of G. When G is a k-ary tree, Hua Wang found a surprising relation between this index and the sum of distances between every pair of leaf vertices of G (called the gamma index) and showed a counterexample for another conjectured functional relationship. In this note, we defined two new natural indices (the spinal index and the Bartlett index) which when summed with the gamma index above, yield the Wiener index. We then show analogous relations to that of Wang, produce a counterexample to a functional relation for the spinal index, and state a conjecture about the Bartlett index.



The Structure of the Guitar: A Mathematical Approach

Candace Basu

Faculty Advisor: Linda Nash

College of Information and Mathematical Sciences, Department of Mathematics

Abstract:

The guitar is one of the most popular and widely used instruments in all the world. The guitar's two-dimensional structure has both vertical and horizontal aspects, which give it its own unique character. The guitar fretboard is structurally equivalent to the neo-Riemannian Tonnetz. Because of this, the PLR operations from music theory, which can be expressed mathematically as functions, can be applied to guitar chords in order to produce new guitar chords with minimal finger movement. The intersection of neo-Riemannian music theory, guitar pedagogy and group theory leads to some rather intriguing mathematical discoveries. Presenting an examination of the mathematics inherent in the structure of the guitar.



The Dichotomy of Humanity in Poetic Form

Jasmine Cason

Faculty Advisor: Brigitte Byrd

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of English

Abstract:

The series of poems that I will be reading from at the Clayton State University Academic Conference 2012 illustrates the battle between one’s carnal state and one’s spiritual state. Coming from a strong Christian background and being a young woman, I identify with the struggles that most young Christian women face and thus write from my personal experience. My work is filled with many Biblical allusions and images along with many romantic and slightly erotic images to show the dichotomy of human-nature: mind vs. body. John Donne, my favorite among the Metaphysical poets, is one of my inspirations. Although he is in touch with his spirituality, he does not ignore the demands (and temptations) of his body.



The Narratives of a Young Cuban Woman

Zurisaray Espinosa

Faculty Advisor: Brigitte Bird

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of English

Abstract:

I write narrative poems inspired by my own personal experiences and by those of women in my family. I come from a long line of Cuban women, yet my experience varies from theirs considerably because I was forced to emigrate to the United States at a young age. The series of poems I will read at the Clayton State University Academic Conference 2012 is about the struggle women in my family often find themselves dealing with. Like most women coming from a similar cultural background, we must face the complex relationships we have with our fathers, our mothers, and our partners. Like most displaced women from my generation, I must deal with my native Cuban culture and my new American culture.



HEXENPROZESSE - The Poetic Synthesis of Goethe's Works and Puella Magi Madoka Magica

Sebastian Lubbers

Faculty Advisor: Brigitte Byrd

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of English

Abstract:

In the 2009 cartoon series Puella Magi Madoka Magica, the work of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe is often woven into the narrative or exists as a referential motif within the show’s setting. The most obvious reference is to Goethe’s Faust where Homura Akemi represents Faust, Kyuubey represents Mephistopheles, and Madoka Kaname represents God. Taking into consideration that Kyuubey represents Mephistopheles, or an equally corrupting force within the show’s setting, and how the show does not mention the backgrounds of the girls corrupted by Kyuubey, I decided to fill in these gaps in the show’s narrative by writing poems based on series and the works of Goethe. The result is a work that preserves the literary elements of the show.



A Series of Lyric Poems by Leigh Maxwell

Leigh Maxwell

Faculty Advisor: Brigitte Byrd

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of English

Abstract:

The series of lyric poems I will read at Clayton State University's Academic Conference 2012 are vignettes taken from the daily life of the narrator, a young, independent American woman living in the 21st century. While the poems tend to be much shorter than those written by Beat poets, they display a beatnik slant such as a tendency to question the expectations placed upon a new generation of American women and they explore similar themes of spirituality and rebellion. the language of these poems is playful, yet the unexpected juxtaposition of words often contributes to striking imagery. Because the poems are brief, each word is chosen carefully in an attempt at using what Ezra Pound calls ‘le mot juste’.



Gender and Sexuality in Twilight and Vampire Academy

Ryan Strader

Faculty Advisor: Ruth Caillouet

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of English

Abstract:

In this paper, I compare and contrast the model of female sexuality presented by Bella, the hero of Stephenie Meyers’ Twilight series, with the model of sexuality presented by Rose, the hero of Richelle Mead’s Vampire Academy series. Using theoretical material from psychologists Carol Gilligan and Caitlin Welles, I examine their representations of female agency, sexual agency, and community sex norms in the books. Using theoretical material from Jeffrey A. Brown I examine whether or not Rose is a fetishized version of femininity or if she is a truly heroic female character written for girls.



All I Really Needed to Know I Learned From Monsters

Michael Sawecki

Faculty Advisor: Greg McNamara

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of English

Abstract:

The word “monster” suggests fearsome, frightening, violent creatures. But monsters in literature often have another profession: they are often teachers, facilitating the development of the characters that they terrify. The young adult novel The Monstrumologist, by Rick Yancey, is a useful text for exploring this role of monstrous instructor. Stephen King’s book It is a comparable tale of adolescents battling monsters that also instruct. By exploring the similarities and differences between these novels, both the lessons and teaching methods of literary monsters are explored.



Lindy Hop and Film: The Preservation of Swing Dance and Swing Culture

Jessamy Bleth

Faculty Advisor: Carol White

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Humanities

Abstract:

Lindy Hop is an American partner dance popular from 1935-1945. Inspired by the dance scenes in American films from the 1940s, a group of Swedish college students formed The Rhythm Hot Shots in the 1980s, a dance club committed to recreating the dances preserved in these films. Today film continues to play an important role in the preservation and spread of Lindy Hop. Many of the cultural aspects of the 1940s have been preserved along with the dances and are ingrained in modern Swing dance culture. The purpose of this project is two-fold: first, to investigate and explain what prompted the initial Lindy Hop revival during the 1980s in Sweden; and second, to examine the continued role of film as a vital preservation method.



Globalization in Postwar Japanese Cinema

Amber Welch

Faculty Advisor: Steve Spence

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Visual and Performing Arts

Abstract:

The influence of globalization on national institutions such as cinema has been a topic of inquiry among media studies scholars for decades. One such scholar, Arjun Appadurai, posits that the complex global flows of media, people, ideas, and technology have been major factors in shaping national identity. In my paper, I use the framework of Appadurai’s theories of globalization to explain the evolution of the Japanese film industry during the years following World War II. I discuss the role of some of the major forces of globalization, such as American troops stationed in Japan and the transnational movement of nuclear weaponry, on the formation of postwar Japanese cinema.



Georgia's Frontier: A Look at its Beginning

Ryan Greer

Faculty Advisor: Randall Gooden

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Humanities

Abstract:

The focus of my paper will be the colonization of Georgia. I will be exploring the key players, the methods used to secure the colony, the developing economy, and the early results of their endeavors. The colonization of Georgia played a large role in the success of the British colonial settlements in North America. The best way to support this idea will be to start by describing the Georgia Trustees, the group of men charged with the oversight of the new colony of Georgia, and their chairman, James Oglethorpe. Next I will examine those individuals who were chosen to move to Georgia and the reasons for their selection. I will also study the intended role of the colony and determine the ex



The Atlanta Child Murders:A Community’s impact to stop a killer

Angela Morris

Faculty Advisor: Marko Maunula

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Humanities

Abstract:

Beginning in the summer of 1979, four black children were missing. By the end of the following year, Atlanta would add an additional 13 children to the list. Fear and frustration throughout the city spread like wild fire and before it was over 30 bodies would be found. The case was surrounded by a large cloud of suspicion. Rumors began to suggest that the Klan was responsible. Public outraged went far beyond the local black communities. However, little is known about how the family of the victims, community and the nation came together financially, spiritually and emotionally to grieve, and fight for justice in an attempt to put an end to what is now called “The Atlanta Child Murders”.



Atlanta’s Famous Penitentiary

Josh Yawn

Faculty Advisor: Randy Rosenburg

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Humanities

Abstract:

For my senior seminar project I plan to give an in depth look at some of the famous / notable prisoners that were or still are still incarcerated at the Atlanta Federal Penitentiary. Not only will I give a detailed look at why they were arrested and convicted for but also any significant occurrences that happened while they were in prison. Back story will also be provided as to what kind of lifestyle they were living before their arrest. An example of this would be Al Capone. He may have only been there for tax evasion, but the life he lived was bound to get him there in due time. He was suspected of bootlegging liquor as well as having ties to many murders, including the Saint Valentine’s Day Massacre.



Inevitable: The Decline of Public History

Roselynn Ware

Faculty Advisor: Randall Gooden

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Humanities

Abstract:

Historians teach others of the past; they cultivate minds in a classroom and beyond. Museums, archives and historic societies preserve history, teach, and entertain. However historians are not always in control of what is seen in public exhibits. This history is censored for various reasons but the censorship may not be saving the institution. The government issues grants to be used to preserve history; but the supply is limited. By not being able to show all of history, people who visit museums or historic societies miss out on the vast differences that make history relevant. This research highlights the practicality of public history and the projection of its future as it relates to the preservation of history outside of academia.



Eleanor Roosevelt: The First woman of many

Kieth Dammann

Faculty Advisor: Marko Maunula

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Humanities

Abstract:

Abstract: This work focuses directly on the impact of Eleanor Roosevelt in women's rights. It includes topics such as women's roles in the New Deal, women's responsibility in voting, and the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights. These key issues allowed for Eleanor Roosevelt to push new boundaries for women in the twentieth century. A definite distinction is made between Eleanor and feminists in how women should empower themselves as is made clear by this work.



Thomas Paine & John Q Adams Thoughts on Government

Joshua Eberhardt

Faculty Advisor: Adam Tate

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Humanities

Abstract:

My initial impression of these two men is that Thomas Paine seems to be in favor of small local government and John Q Adams tends to lean more towards a strong national government. While John Q Adams in of the generation following Thomas Paine I believe that both were important in shaping the governments of their time. Thomas Paine is well known for his pamphlet “Common Sense” and John Q Adams was the sixth president of the United States. They both would have strong influences on the early American government. Though it would seem that compared to Thomas Paine and the other Founding Fathers people such as John Q Adams have been overlooked because they were a generation late.



Collaborators or Peacekeepers: the role French and Danish Police in the Holocaust

James Slocum

Faculty Advisor: John Dunn

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Humanities

Abstract:

Historians have argued that collaboration was important to the Nazis being able to carryout the Holocaust. This paper will assess to what degree the police forces of France and Denmark collaborated with the Nazi regime during the occupation of these countries, particularly in the deportation of Jews to the Holocaust. These countries had two different approaches to dealing with German occupation. While France was willing to follow German demands to deport Jews, Denmark was opposed. This project will draw on memoirs, newspapers, and trial transcripts to assess collaboration during the Holocaust by looking at the police who carried it out.



The Merchant of Colchis: The Metaphor of The Golden Fleece in The Merchant of Venice

Allison Segal

Faculty Advisor: Gregory McNamara

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Interdisciplinary Studies

Abstract:

In The Merchant of Venice, the Golden Fleece acts as more than a reference to antiquity because the mythical Greek ram serves as a metaphor that encompasses the motivations in the play. The metaphor can be most powerfully witnessed when one juxtaposes the characters of Bassanio and Antonio. Bassanio's journey throughout the play to court Portia acts as the embodiment of achieving the Golden Fleece. In contrast, Antonio symbolizes the destruction of the Golden Fleece with his loss of his dear friend Bassanio, his wealth and his reputation.



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