Clayton State University Academic Conference April 6, 2012



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Investigation of the Interaction of Methanol with an Iron Atom Catalyst Using DFT

Marcus Bartlett

Faculty Advisor: Jonathan Lyon

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Natural Sciences

Abstract:

The emission from the combustion of fossil fuels is a major contributor to global warming, and we are quickly depleting the world's supply of these fossil fuels. Methanol is a fuel alcohol which can be used to produce hydrogen fuel sources, which will introduce a new alternative fuel that is not only renewable, but also burns cleaner than fossil fuels. However, the reaction has a high activation energy that limits the production of hydrogen gas on a large scale. Here, the BP86/6-311++g(2d,p) method is utilized as implemented in the GAUSSIAN 03 program to theoretically investigate the interactions between methanol with a single iron atom in order to study the reaction pathway from methanol to hydrogen.



Female Mate Choice in the Bean Beetle, Callosobruchus maculatus

Dimpi Chokshi

Faculty Advisor: Barbara Musolf

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Natural Sciences

Abstract:

Callosobruchus maculatus are model organisms for research into polyandry. Research in other labs showed that female bean beetles exhibit a type of post-mating sexual selection known as cryptic female choice. We observed female behavior toward males in order to determine whether there was overt female preference of males prior to mating. We hypothesized that females would prefer larger males. Results indicated that females showed no preference for larger or smaller males (p > 0.10). Because different male morphs are identified by penis morphology, we examined the male penises and identified three different morphs; round spiky, long spiky and long non-spiky penises. We hope to determine whether there is a correlation between these different p values.



Isolation and Characterization of the Insulin-like Receptor from the Bean Beetle Callosobruchus maculates

Jennifer Crisci

Faculty Advisor: Richard Singiser

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Natural Sciences

Abstract:

The bean beetle, Callosobruchus maculates, is a useful model organism for undergraduate study. The life cycle goes from egg to adult in 4 weeks andcolonies can be maintained onparticular species of dried beans.Beetles sharemany orthologous genes with humans. The insulin receptor and insulin-like receptor pathways, found in both invertebrates and vertebrates, are involved in glucose uptake, glycogen formation, storage of fats and protein synthesis. Bean beetles grown on different species of beans develop distinct morphologies.Since the nutritional composition of each bean varies, we hypothesize that the diet of the beetle during larval development influences morphological changes in the adult. We aim to identify and characterize the insulin-like receptor.



Steam Reformation of Ethanol using an Iron Catalyst

Patrick Drew

Faculty Advisor: Jonathan Lyon

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Natural Sciences

Abstract:

Steam reformation is the process by which a fossil fuel is converted into syngas (i.e., CO and H2). By improving this process, applications whereby natural gases are converted to their respective fuel alcohols on-site at natural gas reserves to ease transportation issues associated with gasses (e.g. via pipeline) may become feasible. We study the reverse reaction using the computational chemistry program, Gaussian, to calculate the reaction pathway from ethanol and water to syngas with an iron catalyst. The lowest energy iron substitutions are calculated using the B3LYP/6-311++g(2d,p) method, and it has been found that iron likely insert itself into the O-H bond as a first step in the reaction pathway. Further investigations are ongoing.



Testing RNAi on C. elegans to determine what plasmids affect the behavioral phenotype

Vinh Duong

Faculty Advisor: Francine Norflus

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Natural Sciences

Abstract:

This experiment explains the concept of RNA interference studies performed on the worm C. elegans. RNA has become more known due to its homologous genes with those associated with human disease. C. elegans has become an attractive model to use for studying general biological processes and understanding the pathogenesis of disease. RNAi is a technique that allows dsRNA to be introduced into a cell to either cause a decrease or absence of gene expression. The dsRNA are added to the worms and transformation will be performed. In the laboratory, this experiment will be conducted from four to five days. Prior to experimentation, I have to cultivate the worm and prepare the media. I will then test to see the phenotype of the worms.



GC/MS Analysis of 40 Year Old Pentobarbital Samples

Aleena Farooq

Faculty Advisor: Susan Hornbuckle

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Natural Sciences

Abstract:

Samples of Nembutal® that were manufactured by Abbott Laboratories in the late 1960’s have been kept in an unopened bottle in a controlled environment for the past 40+ years. These samples were analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively for pentobarbital and its decomposition products. Purification techniques and GC/MS analysis will be presented.



Hydrogen Bonding of Halogenated Acetic Acid Molecules

Sydney Herrington

Faculty Advisor: Patricia Todebush

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Natural Sciences

Abstract:

Hydrogen bonding is a key factor in understanding the boiling points of compounds. When acetic acid is fluorinated, the boiling point increases but unexpectedly decreases when more fluorine is added to the molecule. To explain this observation gas phase molecules of acetic acid, its fluorinated derivatives and their dimers were constructed using the Gaussian 03 Computational Chemistry Program. The ground state molecular geometries, energies and electrostatic potentials were calculated using Density Functional Theory and a B3LYP 6-311G basis set. In addition a similar study of chlorinated acetic acid compounds was also completed. This work supports the hypothesis that boiling points depend on electrostatic interactions.



Redox Behavior of Methyl Viologen at Clay-Modified Electrodes

Mariesha Pugh

Faculty Advisor: Augustine Agyeman

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Natural Sciences

Abstract:

Methyl viologen (MV2+) exhibits fast reversible electrochemical behavior. MV2+ can be reduced to MV+?, which can also be reduced to MV. A suite of experiments were performed to analyze how MV2+, MV+?, and MV behave within clay interlayers. Clay interlayers are negatively charged so readily attract MV2+ through ion exchange. MV+? and MV remain mobile because localization is prevented by distribution of negative charge to the hydrophobic part of the structure. Cyclic voltammogram at the bare electrode shows two reversible reduction potentials. Only one reversible peak is observed at the clay-modified electrode indicating that MV+? generated is not localized.



Regional Comparison of Abstinence Only versus Comprehensive Sexual Education Programs and Program Impact on Youth in the United States

Christie Wooten

Faculty Advisor: Samuel Maddox

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology

Abstract:

This investigation examines possible regional differences in the scope of sexual education and subsequent differences in adolescents’ self-reported sexual risk taking using the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System. This study will focus on age of onset of sexual behavior, number of partners, effective contraceptive use, and substance use during sexual encounters. Specifically, this investigation will evaluate the odds of a state reporting an elevated risk level of the items above as a function of the scope of their sexual education curriculum.



A Mixed Method Study of Community Cohesion and Fear of Crime

Samara Chapple & Jennifer Polk

Faculty Advisor: Lisa Holland-Davis

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Social Sciences

Abstract:

Social cohesion is an essential component of a community’s ability to mobilize against crime. This ability is also central to the community justice model, the ultimate goal of which is increasing overall quality of life. A mixed methods design will be used to address the effects of community cohesion on the perceptions of crime and satisfaction with formal responses to it. The study uses quantitative and qualitative data gathered sequentially. Survey data will examine whether community cohesion negatively influences fear of crime and satisfaction with police. The interview data will explore perceived barriers to effective community cohesion and crime prevention among a subset of survey respondents.



Toward an Understanding of Why Consumers Use Social Media

Kristi Kinney

Faculty Advisor: Anita Whiting

College of Business, Department of Marketing, Management, and Supply Chain

Abstract:

More than 70% of online teens and almost half of online adults in the United States use social-networking Web sites (Hollenbaugh 2011). This study will apply uses and gratification theory to social media use among today’s college students (Blumler & McQuail, 1969; McLeod & Becker, 1974). In addition to examining the uses and benefits gained from social media, this study will also investigate whether other variables such as such as age and gender impact social media usage. Study will look at what social media platforms are most often used and how much time students engage in social media. Overall, this study seeks to explore why individuals use social media and what benefits they get from social media.



The Impact of Calcium Supplements and Exercise on the Incidence of Hip Fractures in Older Adults

Leslie Narain, Jason Fordyce, Laura Pinkney & Malivone Singha

Faculty Advisor: Jennell Charles

College of Health, Department of Nursing

Abstract:

According to the International Osteoporosis Foundation Approximately 1.6 million hip fractures occur worldwide each year, by 2050 this number could reach between 4.5 million and 6.3 million (International Osteoporosis Foundation, 2011). Hip fractures not only incur serious life changes in older adults, but they are placed at an increase risk of falling again. Hip fractures are serious fall injuries that often result in long-term functional impairment, nursing home admission and increased mortality. The aim of this systematic review was to recognize the relationship between the use of calcium supplements and exercise on the incidence of hip fractures in older adults; and to define the major risk factors in hip fractures among older adults.



Postpartum Depression - “More than Just the Baby Blues”, An Abbreviated Systematic Review

Colleen Walters, Shari Miller & Ashley Thomas

Faculty Advisor: Jennell Charles

College of Health, Department of Nursing

Abstract:

Child birth is a period of transition for the family, one that can be viewed as a wonderful challenge or a crisis. For about 28% (over 400,000) of new mothers in the United States, child birth becomes a crisis that plunges them into debilitating depression, lasting beyond the 10 days of the ‘baby blues’ period (Ricci & Kyle, 2009). This abbreviated systematic review summerized the findings of four observational quantitative studies, in order to identify risks factors for postpartum depression. The major risk factors identified that decreased the incidence of postpartum depression were: home deliveries with midwives, control of pain, and minimal perinatal complications. Recommendations include; more midwifery care and home deliveries.



Global Calendar

Thanh-Phong Tran

Faculty Advisor: Junfeng Qu

College of Information and Mathematical Sciences, Department of Information Technology

Abstract:

Task management has always been troublesome to master. I am putting effort into building a desktop app., which would be deployed on a desktop background as an interactive calendar, changes to it woulb be made by simply clicking on it and entering a note. The true beauty comes in when you have multiple devices with the same sofware on it, changes made through one calendar will be uploaded to a cloud and then syncronized with other devices. To take it one step further, a user can share a calendar with another user so they are able to set dates that they can visually see on their respective calendars. Furthermore a subscription feature will be implemented where a business will be able to send out notices onto a subscriber's calendar.



Newton's Method and Fractals

Michael Bennington

Faculty Advisor: Christopher Raridan

College of Information and Mathematical Sciences, Department of Mathematics

Abstract:

We explore the dynamics of Newton's method and apply the method to create a class of fractals.



Survey of KdV Equation

Jarvis Turner

Faculty Advisor: Catherine Matos

College of Information and Mathematical Sciences, Department of Mathematics

Abstract:

A Solition is a solitary wave whose height is unchanged for a given period of time. It can be expressed algebraically and these algebraic expressions are solutions of certain partial differential equations. One such equation is the Korterweg de Vries equation or the KdV equation which is the simplest soliton equation. I will show the difference between a soliton and a regular wave via graphs and the different soliton solutions that come from the KdV equation.



Oral Presentations

To tell the truth: Assessing the ability of children to provide courtroom testimony

Crystal Cohen

Faculty Advisor: Deborah Deckner-Davis

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology

Abstract:

This proposal presents a review of empirical findings concerning cognitive and developmental factors affecting the acquisition of testimony from children. Three main ideas are examined: the validity of court competency measures; factors affecting accuracy, reliability, and suggestibility; and interview techniques that enhance or degrade accuracy. Children’s competency to testify must be evaluated on the basis of psychological constructs and scientific measures. Specific techniques can increase testimonial accuracy and reliability over time, as well as reduce the suggestibility of the child witnesses. Research findings can serve as an impetus for policy reform and provide direct information to court officers.



The impact of racial stereotypes on the academic achievement

Jamal El-Amin

Faculty Advisor: Eric Bridges

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology

Abstract:

This presentation will address the impact of racial stereotypes on the academic achievement of African Americans. I will deal with the theory of stereotype threat, and how stereotypes are a self-fulfilling prophecy. Resiliency, coping strategies, and perseverance, of African Americans will be analyzed in order to discover what crucial factors lead to greater degree attainment and an increase in overall retention rates.



Access and Utilization of Support Services by Families Affected with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

Mindy James

Faculty Advisor: Deborah Deckner

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology

Abstract:

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder characterized by impairments in communication, socialization, and repetitive interests and behaviors (NIMH, 2008). There are conflicting results on the impact of socioeconomic status (SES) and an ASD diagnosis (Bhasion, 2007; Larsson, et al., 2005). This study will present preliminary data on the relationship between SES and ASD by evaluating if the age of diagnosis or diagnostic process varies by SES. Additionally demographic variables, such as community level SES, caregiver education, ethnicity, and other familial demographics will be evaluated to determine if they influence the degree to which families are selecting evidence based treatment approaches for their child with ASD.



Little Man Tate and Other Great Minds

Maria Morales-Beale

Faculty Advisor: Kelli Nipper

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology

Abstract:

A marriage of school psychology and math education is necessary in supporting the development of young minds. How do you accommodate a student who is capable of going beyond what is being taught in the classroom, while simultaneously maintaining the pace at which the other students are learning? We aim to answer this pertinent question through a series of methods and evaluation of certain mathematical and psychology definitions, such as “social facilitation”, maintenance versus improvement, and clarity of basic math terminology. A clip of the movie “Little Man Tate” will act as the catalyst for the discussion of how a math teacher can best respond to the student and the classroom environment.



African-American Male Students and America’s Public Schools: A Paradox of Underachievement

Vincent Montez Smith

Faculty Advisor: Eric Bridges

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology

Abstract:

African-American male students have been wrestling with the profound question of “how does it feel to be a problem” for quite some time. Their educational and professional goals have been distanced by a public education system and a collective conscience which fails to prepare them for an increasingly brutal, knowledge-based job market. This research addresses the critical issues and systemic impediments that cause more than fifty percent of African-American male students to fail to meet the standard of timely high school graduation.



The many benefits of college students mentoring middle school students

Teresa English, Alexander Brown & S'dravious Deveaux

Faculty Advisor: Michelle Furlong

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Natural Sciences

Abstract:

This presentation will highlight the benefits received from a mentorship between Clayton State University science majors and students from Rex Mill Middle School. Rex Mill Middle School is in a district composed of 96% minority students of whom 82% receive free or reduced meals. These children are often at a disadvantage due to their lower economic status. The benefits for younger children include better performance in the Science Olympiad with increased interest in the science fields. College student interns were able to increase their own science content knowledge, research skills, leadership skills and communication skills while representing Clayton State University. The University benefits by having a larger presence in the community.



International Public Health in Juanacatlan, Mexico

Shari Perry , Justin Pollard & Colleen Walters

Faculty Advisor: Khedija Gadhoum

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Humanities

Abstract:

Stemming from a practical nursing experience in rural Juanacatlan, Mexico, the presenters took the Guadalajara Study Abroad program beyond the common Spanish language frontiers. By partnering with the Fundacion Antonio Molina Alfaro and the University of Guadalajara, the students were able to organize a special health fair, in Spanish, for the local residents whose main causes of mortality were cancer and malnutrition. Results were astounding more than 200 attendees received valuable health services. This experience was not only beneficial for the local community in need of competent health care, but CSU students whose strong commitment to health service and cultural exchange that promoted human development of the global community.



The Role of the Antennae in Female Callosobruchus maculatus for distant chemoreception

Ashley Higgins

Faculty Advisor: Barbara Musolf

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Natural Sciences

Abstract:

The female Callosobruchus maculatus, prefers particular beans on which to lay her eggs. Previous research showed that ablation of the antenna did not alter the female’s ability to detect differences in bean species, when she is placed in contact with them. We propose that the antennae may play a role in locating beans at distant locations.



A Study of Accounting Frauds

Corina Gill

Faculty Advisor: Maria Bullen

College of Business, Department of Accounting, Economics, and Finance

Abstract:

The twenty first century brought with it the exposure of fraudulent activities in mega national and international corporations. The types of fraud included health care, insurance, and financial services fraud. Some companies involved were Adelphia Communications, Enron, HealthSouth, and WorldCom. The nature of these frauds ranged from executives inflating financial results to misstating financial assets. This paper investigates some companies identified as perpetrators of fraud, and examines both the nature of the fraud and the consequences to the individuals and companies engaged in fraudulent activities. Finally, the researcher identifies possible actions, if taken earlier, which may have prevented the disastrous result of the fraud.



A Comparison of FDI between Singapore and Malaysia

Tony Yaacoub

Faculty Advisor: Chen-Miao Lin

College of Business, Department of Accounting, Economics, and Finance

Abstract:

Given their growth rates, large markets, and reformed economic systems, both Singapore and Malaysia appear to be equally likely candidates for foreign direct investment (FDI). Yet, Singapore has received substantially more FDI. We apply the Porterian framework of the competitiveness of nations to compare Malaysia and Singapore, collecting evidence of differences in demand, factor conditions and firm strategy, structure and rivalry, differences in related and supporting industries, and Porter’s other two factors—government and chance factors—to explain the differential in the two countries’ FDI flows. We will also analyze and predict the future of FDI in these two countries.



Students Conduct Research for Atlanta-Lean-Startup-Cirlce

Devon Bivins

Faculty Advisor: Beverly Wright

College of Business, Department of Marketing, Management, and Supply Chain

Abstract:

Atlanta-Lean-Startup-Circle wanted to gain insight on how to improve its organization, such as how to increase membership and meeting attendance and how to better serve the community. The web-based entrepreneurial group solicited students from Clayton State to conduct research that would help them answer their questions. I collaborated with Indi Somers and Atlanta-Lean-Startup's organizer, Pete Santora to coordinate a research effort that we hoped would accomplish our objectives. We distributed a survey created in Qualtrics, processed the responses in SPSS, and analyzed the results. At the completion of the project, Indi and I learned a lot about the research process, and Pete learned a lot about Atlanta-Lean-Startup's target market.


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