mainstream institutions

Stokely Carmichael and Charles Hamilton, from Black Power (1967)Stokely Carmichael and Charles Hamilton, from Black Power (1967)
The advocates of Black Power reject the old slogans and meaningless rhetoric of previous years in the civil rights struggle. The language of yesterday is indeed irrelevant: progress, non-violence, integration, fear of white backlash
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Black Power SpeechBlack Power Speech
We had nothing to offer that they could see, except to go out and be beaten again. We helped to build their frustration. We had only the old language of love and suffering
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Stokely Carmichael on Black PowerStokely Carmichael on Black Power
Where Negroes lack a majority, black power means proper representation and sharing of control. It means the creation of power bases from which black people can work to change statewide or nationwide patterns of oppression through pressure from strength – instead
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Working for Postcolonial Legal Studies: Working with the Indigenous HumanitiesWorking for Postcolonial Legal Studies: Working with the Indigenous Humanities
Citation: Findlay, I, ‘Working for Postcolonial Legal Studies: Working with the Indigenous Humanities’, 2003 (1) Law, Social Justice & Global Development Journal
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