Caribbean Basin Trade Enhancement Key Dates



Download 32.16 Kb.
Date conversion29.04.2016
Size32.16 Kb.
Caribbean Basin Trade Enhancement

Key Dates 

May 18, 2000

In South Lawn ceremony before more than 300 guests, President Clinton signs HR 434 into law (PL 106-200). 

May 11, 2000

Conference agreement on HR 434 approved by Senate on a vote of 77 to 19. 

May 4, 2000

Conference agreement on HR 434 approved by the House on a vote of 309 to 110. 

April 13, 2000

Breaking a months-long log-jam, Congressional leaders reach “agreement in principle” on CBI and Africa trade enhancement. Staff spend next two weeks working out details.

February 7, 2000

FY 2001 budget includes funds for Caribbean Basin Trade Enhancement. 

January 29, 2000

At a World Trade Forum in Davos, Switzerland, President Clinton again cites his strong support for CBI trade enhancement. 

January 27, 2000

In his final State of the Union Address, President Clinton asked Congress to “finalize” the CBI trade enhancement legislation.

November 3, 1999

Senate Caribbean Basin Trade Enhancement legislation as Title II of the Trade and Development Act of 1999 (HR 434) by a vote of 76 to 19. 

June 10, 1999

House Ways and Means Committee approves CBI trade enhancement legislation (HR 984). 

May 18, 1999

House Ways and Means Trade Subcommittee approves CBI trade enhancement legislation (HR 984). 

March 23, 1999

House Ways and Means Trade Subcommittee holds hearing on CBI trade enhancement legislation (HR 984). 

March 9, 1999

President Clinton pledges support for CBI trade enhancement during a two-day visit to the Central America region. 

March 4, 1999

The Administration transmits a CBI trade enhancement bill to the Congress. 

March 4, 1999

Reps. Phil Crane (R-IL), Jim Kolbe (R-AZ), Charlie Rangel (D-NY), and Bob Matsui (D-CA) introduce CBI trade enhancement legislation as part of a package of relief measures for hurricane reconstruction. 

February 3, 1999

Led by the Chamber of Commerce, a broad coalition of several dozen business organizations and trade associations – representing, among other things, every element of the garment supply chain from cotton to consumer – call for enactment of CBI trade enhancement legislation as part of a package of relief measures for hurricane reconstruction. 

February 3, 1999

Senator Bob Graham (D-FL), joined by a bipartisan mix of 9 other Senators, introduces CBI trade enhancement legislation as part of a package of relief measures for hurricane reconstruction. 

February 2, 1999

President Clinton includes funding for CBI trade enhancement in his FY 2000 budget. 

January 25, 1999

Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-MS) issues the first of several statements calling for passage of CBI trade enhancement legislation. 

January 19, 1999

President Clinton calls for measures to aid in reconstructing Central America and foster trade with Latin America in his State of the Union. 

December 11, 1998

After meeting with Central American leaders in Washington, President Clinton declares “We will continue to support Caribbean Basin enhancement legislation to make trade more free and more fair, and to help Central American nations restore their economies.  I hope very much that it will pass in this coming Congress.” 

November 9, 1998

 


Central American Presidents issue a plea for passage of Caribbean Basin Trade Enhancement to aid in reconstruction of Hurricane Mitch. 

October 24, 1998

President Clinton expresses disappointment that CBI trade legislation was not enacted during 105th Congress and restates his support for enactment during 106th Congress. 

July 23, 1998

Following Finance Committee action, President Clinton makes first of several calls to urge enactment of CBI trade legislation before end of 105th Congress. 

July 21, 1998

Senate Finance Committee approves Caribbean trade enhancement legislation on a vote of 18 - 2 as part of an omnibus trade package. 

June 24, 1998

At a hearing on an Africa trade bill, Finance Committee members and Administration witnesses repeatedly discuss the need to "move" CBI trade enhancement legislation as soon as possible. 

April 6, 1998

Secretary of State Albright tells Caribbean heads of state that the Administration is committed to pressing for passage of CBI trade enhancement in 1998. 

February 2, 1998

President Clinton includes funding for CBI Trade Enhancement in the FY 1999 budget. 

January 25, 1998

Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-MS) issues the first of several public calls for passage of S. 1278. 

November 4, 1997

House defeats HR 2264 by a vote of 182 to 234. 

October 9, 1997

House Ways and Means Committee approves by voice vote a 14-month Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership bill (H 2264). 

October 1, 1997

Senate Finance Committee approves by voice vote a 3-year Caribbean Trade Enhancement bill (S. 1278). 

September 17, 1997

Senate Finance Committee holds a hearing and requests comments on fast track, Caribbean parity, and Africa trade legislation. 

July 31, 1997

Conferees on Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 (HR 2014) file joint conference report without CBI parity provisions.

June 26, 1997:

House approves Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 (HR 2014). Subtitle H of Title IX contains a one-year parity bill. 

June 26, 1997

Congressman Charles B. Rangel (D-NY) introduces CBTEA (HR 2096) on behalf of the Administration. 

June 26, 1997

Senator Bob Graham (D-FL) introduces CBTEA (S 984) on behalf of the Administration. 

June 17, 1997

USTR Charlene Barshesfky transmits copy of draft Caribbean Basin Trade Enhancement Act (CBTEA) to Congress. 

May 10, 1997

President Clinton repeats the pledge to Caribbean leaders at Bridgetown, Barbados. 

May 8, 1997:

President Clinton pledges to Central American leaders to seek enactment of Caribbean Trade Enhancement provisions at San Jose, Costa Rica. 

February 6, 1997

President Clinton submits FY 1998 budget funding Caribbean Basin Trade Enhancement package. 

October 1, 1996

USTR releases Second Annual Report on Operation of the CBERA, noting the Administration’s intention to seek enactment of Caribbean trade enhancement legislation. 

March 19, 1996

President Clinton submits FY 1997 budget funding a Caribbean Basin parity trade package. 

October 3, 1995:

A broad coalition of textile and apparel associations express support for parity in a letter to Senate Finance Committee Chairman Bill Roth (R-DE). 

May 15, 1995:

Senate Finance Trade Subcommittee holds a hearing on pending Caribbean parity legislation. 

March 10, 1995

Senator Bob Graham (D-FL) introduces The Caribbean Basin Trade Security Act (S. 529). Sponsors include: Mack, Lott, Bradley Moseley-Braun, Hatch, Grassley, McCain, Pryor, Lugar, Dodd, and Gregg. 

February 10, 1995:

House Ways and Means Trade Subcommittee holds a hearing on Caribbean parity. 

January 18, 1995:

Congressman Phil Crane (R-IL) introduces The Caribbean Basin Trade Security Act (HR 553). Sponsors include: Shaw, Gibbons, Rangel, Towns, Deutsch, Owens, Torres, Menendez, Hastings, A., McKinney, Mfume, Wynn, Meek, Jackson-Lee, Tucker, Wilson, Johnson, E., Fattah, and Kolbe. 

January 1, 1994

NAFTA takes effect. 

December 8, 1993

President Clinton signs NAFTA Implementation Act into law. 

June 24, 1993:

House Ways and Means Trade Subcommittee holds a hearing on Caribbean parity. 

June 24, 1993

Senator Bob Graham introduces Senate version of HR 1403 -- S. 1155. Other sponsors include: Sens. Durenberger and Mack. 

June 7, 1993:

House Ways and Means Trade Subcommittee publishes written comments on Caribbean parity (HR 1403). 

March 18, 1993:

Congressman Sam Gibbons introduces HR 1403 -- The Caribbean Basin Free Trade Agreements Act. Other sponsors include: Pickle, Crane, Rangel, McKinney, Mfume, Torres, Towns, de la Garza, Deutsch, Serrano, and Hutchinson, T. 

July 1, 1992:

House Subcommittees on International Economic Policy and Trade and Western Hemisphere Affairs hold a joint hearing on the effect of NAFTA on the Caribbean. 

 Last Updated: 5/29/00


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page