Cardinal Mooney Catholic High School Advance Placement United States History Syllabus 2015-16 Course Description: The Advance Placement (AP) United States History course is designed to



Download 108.86 Kb.
Date conversion20.04.2016
Size108.86 Kb.

Cardinal Mooney Catholic High School

Advance Placement United States History

Syllabus 2015-16
Course Description:
The Advance Placement (AP) United States History course is designed to:

  1. Provide students with the analytical and factual knowledge necessary to deal with the problems and materials in U.S. History.

  2. Prepare students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them that are equivalent to those made by introductory college courses.

  3. Teach students to assess historical materials – their relevance to given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance – and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship.

  4. Develop the necessary skills to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informal judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in easy format.

  5. Advanced Placement U.S. History is a college level survey course of U.S. history from the pre-Columbian period to the present.


Themes

While the course follows a narrative structure supported by the textbook and audiovisual materials, the following seven themes described in the AP U.S. History Course and Exam Description are woven throughout each unit of study:

1. Identity (ID)

2. Work, Exchange, and Technology (WXT)

3. Peopling (PEO)

4. Politics and Power (POL)

5. America in the World (WOR)

6. Environment and Geography (ENV)

7. Ideas, Beliefs, and Culture (CUL)
Historical Thinking Skills

These skills reflect the tasks of professional historians. While learning to master these tasks, AP U.S. History students act as “apprentice historians.”



  • Chronological Reasoning

  1. Historical Causation

  2. Patterns of Continuity and Change Over Time

  3. Periodization




  • Comparison and Contextualization

  1. Comparison

  2. Contextualization




  • Crafting Historical Arguments from Historical Evidence

  1. Historical Argumentation

  2. Appropriate Use of Historical Evidence

  • Historical Interpretation and Synthesis

  1. Interpretation

  2. Synthesis


Course Materials
Readings

The main text Give Me Liberty provides students with a basic overview of the evolving American experience. The text is supplemented by a diverse selection of primary and secondary sources. Using secondary works from Voices of Freedom and American Issues, students will analyze essays by prominent historians. Throughout the year, students will be asked to write essays that are designed to develop skills in argumentation and the use of evidence and interpretation. Primary Source Analysis: Students analyze primary sources using APPARTS on which they identify, analyze, and evaluate each of the sources. Students analyze the sources for two or more of the following features: historical context, purpose and intended audience, the author’s point of view, type of source, argument and tone. (Appropriate use of historical evidence.)


Course Texts:

Textbook

  • Eric Foner, Give Me Liberty! An American History, 3rd AP* Edition, New York: W.W. Norton, 2013.


[CR1a] – The course includes a college-level textbook
Supplemental Texts:

  • Eric Foner, Voices of Freedom: A Documentary History, 3rd Edition, New York: W.W. Norton, 2011.

  • David A. Shi and Holly E. Mayer, For the Record: A Documentary History of America, New York: W.W. Norton, 2013.

  • Karen Dunn- Haley, Stephen K. Davis, Matthew Schoenbachler, and Wendy Wall, The Norton Mix: American History (customizable database reader available at wwnorton. com)

  • Dollar, Charles M., Reichard, Gary W. American Issues: A Documentary Reader Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 2002

  • The Center for Learning U.S. History 1 & U.S. History 2 (Workbooks)

  • Glencoe, McGraw-Hill, Interpreting Political Cartoons (Workbook)

  • Additional articles and assorted readings


[CR1c] - The course includes secondary sources written by historians or scholars interpreting the past
Document Based Questions (DBQs)


  1. English Colonies North and South (1993)

  2. American Revolution (1999)

  3. The 1780’s: A Critical Period? (Articles of Confederation) (1985)

  4. Jacksonian Democracy (1990)

  5. Constitutional/Social Developments 1860-1877 (1996)

  6. Expansionism, Old and New (1994)

  7. The Fight Over the Versailles Treaty (1991)

  8. The Decision to Drop the Bomb (1988)


DBQ Deconstruction: Students, working in groups, will read the sources from and debate the question posed by the DBQ.
Author’s Thesis Paper:

Students are provided with opposing viewpoints expressed in either primary or secondary source documents and in writing must determine the following:

The Thesis:

• What is the main argument of each author?

The Evidence:

• Looking at the supporting evidence, analyze whether they are logically interpreted

by the authors. Do they clearly support the thesis?

Critical Analysis:

• What do the sources add to your own understanding of the topic?

• What points are strongly made and well documented?

Final Analysis: (Your opinion is expressed here without the use of any form of the pronoun “I”.)

• Which of the sources makes the most convincing case and why?



For each source, complete the thesis, evidence, and critical analysis sections.
[CR5] The course provides opportunities for students to develop coherent written arguments that have a thesis supported by relevant historical evidence
Assessments
At the completion of each unit, students will be given a quiz and a timed exam that consists of multiple choice and free response questions. Students will also have periodic Document Based Quizzes throughout the course of this semester. In addition to these exams, students will have daily homework assignments that can range from additional readings, to research projects. Students will also be required to participate in class, as well as book reviews, projects (both group and individual), and mini-research papers.

Grading


  • Grades will be calculated by points. Student progress will be evaluated, on a unit basis, through seminars, homework, writing assignments, quizzes, and tests.




  • Students will complete a Reading Guide for each chapter of the textbook.

  1. Students will analyze diverse primary and secondary sources.



  • There will be formal writing assignments based on the essay formats required for the AP U.S. History Exam.




  • Students will be required to do group and individual presentations.




  • Homework will be posted on the board and on Edline each day.




  • Students must have a 3-ring binder filled with loose leaf paper. All homework, handouts, and other course material must be kept in student binders.


CMC Grading Scale

Grade

Percentage

Grade

Percentage

Grade

Percentage

Grade

Percentage

A

100-95

B

90-87

C

82-79

D

74-71

A-

94-93

B-

86-85

C-

78-77

D-

70-69

B+

92-91

C+

84-83

D+

76-75

F

68-0

Curriculum Calendar
FIRST SEMESTER
PERIOD 1 1491-1607 & PERIOD 2 1607-1754


Time for the Entire Units for Periods 1 & 2

Unit Learning Objectives

Unit Key Concepts

20 days

ID-4, ID-5,WXT-4, PEO-1, PEO-4, PEO-5, POL-1, WOR -2, WOR-2, ENV-1, ENV-2, ENV-4, CUL-1, AND CUL-4

1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3

The first part of this course is handled by assigning students a series of tasks to complete over the summer vacation, including:

  • Reading and note-taking in Chapters 1, & 2 in Forner




  • Assigned readings from American Issues Chapter 3




    • Students are to answer “consider” questions after each section (pg. 40, 42, 43,45, 47, 49 & 52)

    • Do Chapter Questions pg. 52



PERIOD 1 1491-1607
Chapter 1 – A New World

Topics Covered - The First Americans, Indian Freedom, European Freedom, The Expansion of Europe, Contact, The Spanish Empire, The French and Dutch Empires
Key Concepts: 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2,
Themes: ID- 4, WXT- 1, WXT- 4, PEO- 1, PEO- 4, PEO- 5, POL- 1, ENV- 2, ENV- 4, CUL- 1
[CR1b] The course includes diverse primary sources consisting of written documents, maps, images, quantitative data (charts, graphs, tables), and works of art.
[CR1c] The course includes secondary sources written by historians or scholars interpreting the past
Historical Thinking Skills: Historical Argumentation, Use of Evidence, Historical Causation, Synthesis
Resources: Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 1. Use the text for images, Chapter 1: The Village of Secoton, pp. 4– 5; Tenotchtitlán, p. 10; Pueblo Bonita, p. 11; Native Americans dancing, p. 12; Map of Native Ways of Life, engraving by a Jesuit priest, p. 17; Columbus’s Landfall, p. 24; the Florentine Codex, p. 26; the Florentine Codex, p. 27; Four Racial Groups, p. 30; Spanish missionaries, p. 32; and Spanish conquistadores, p. 33. John F. Richards, The Unending Frontier, “The Columbian Exchange: The West Indies” (Berkeley: The University of California Press, 2003).
PERIOD 2 1607-1754

[CR2] Each of the course historical periods receives explicit attention
Chapter 2 – Beginnings of English America 1607-1660

Topics Covered – England and the New World, the Coming of the English, Settling the Chesapeake, the New England Way, New Englanders Divided, Religion, Politics and Freedom
Key Concepts – 1.3, 2.1, 2.2
Themes: ID- 4, ID- 5, WXT- 1, WXT- 2, WXT- 4, PEO- 1, PEO- 5, CUL- 1

[CR6] The course provides opportunities for students to identify and evaluate diverse historical interpretations – Interpretations
Historical Thinking Skills: Historical Argumentation, Use of Evidence

Chapter 3 – Creating Anglo-America 1660-1750

Topics Covered – Global competition and the Expansion of England’s Empire, Origins of American Slavery, Colonies in Crisis, The Growth of Colonial America, Social Classes in the Colonies
Key Concepts – 1.3, 2.2
APPARTS Worksheet - A teacher- generated document analysis sheet directing students to tasks. For this lesson the document analysis sheets focus students on specific points to analyze documents. Document analysis is done by author (A), place and time (P), Prior Knowledge (P), Audience (A), Reason (R), The Main Idea (T), Significance (S).
Special Activity - Introduction of APPARTS Worksheet/Description of Document Based Questions (DBQ)

– DBQ the College Board’s 1993 English Colonies Chesapeake and New England


Resources: Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Reading assigned prior to lesson: Chapter 3.
Chapter 4 – Slavery, Freedom and the Struggle for the Empire to 1763

Topics Covered – Slavery and the empire, Slave Cultures and Slave Resistance, an Empire of Freedom, The Public Sphere, The Great Awakening, Imperial Rivalries, Battle for the Continent
Key Concepts – 3.1
Themes: ID- 1, ID- 4, WXT- 4, PEO- 1, WOR- 1, WOR- 2, ENV- 2, CUL- 4

[CR9] - The course provides opportunities for students to identify and analyze patterns of continuity and change over time and connect them to a larger historical process or themes
Historical Thinking Skills: Continuity and Change over Time, Periodization, Historical Causation, Historical. Argumentation
Resources - Forner Chapters 1, 2, 3 & 4
Supplemental Reading: Dollar/Reichard – Read Chapter 3 and complete consider questions at end of chapter

PERIOD 3 1763-1800 [CR2]

Time for the Entire Units for Period 3

Unit Learning Objectives

Unit Key Concepts

16 Days

ID-1, ID-4, ID-5,id-6, WXT-1, WXT-2, WXT-4, WXT-6, PEO-4, PEO-5, POL-1, POL-2, POL-5, WOR-1 WOR -2, WOR-5, ENV-2, ENV-3, ENV-4, CUL-1, CUL-2, AND CUL-4

3.1, 3.2, 3.3



Chapter 5 – The American Revolution 1763-1783

Topics Covered – The Crisis Begins, the Road to Revolution, The Coming of Independence, Securing Independence
Key Concept – 3.1
Themes: ID- 1, WXT- 1, POL- 1, WOR- 1, WOR- 2, ENV- 4, CUL- 2, CUL- 4

[CR8] - The course provided opportunities for students to examine relationships between causes and consequences of events or processes.
Historical Thinking Skills: Historical Causation, Contextualization, Use of Evidence Historical, Argumentation
Resources: Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Reading assigned prior to lesson: Chapter 5. A primary source set with excerpts of documents revealing causes of the Revolution: From Give Me Liberty!: Paine’s “Common Sense, 1776” on p. 200. From The Norton Mix: American History: “Resolutions of the Stamp Act Congress, 1765” and”The Declaration of Independence, 1776.” From Shi and Mayer’s For the Record: John Dickinson’s “Letters from a Pennsylvania Farmer, 1767– 68.” A set of images drawn from Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 5, instructor’s disc (page numbers refer to the 3rd AP Edition): “Pro Patria” on the Stamp Act, p. 189; “The Boston Massacre,” p. 193; “Bostonians Paying the Excise- Man,” p. 194; “Virtual Representation,” p. 186; and “Mitred Minuet,” p. 195.

Chapter 6 – The Revolution from Within

Topics Covered – Democratizing Freedom, Toward Religious Toleration, defining Economic Freedom, The Limits of Liberty, Slavery and the Revolution, Daughters of Liberty
Key Concept – 3.2
Themes: ID- 1, WXT- 6, POL- 5, WOR- 1, WOR- 2, CUL- 2, CUL- 4

[CR5]

Historical Thinking Skills: Historical Causation, Continuity and Change over Time, Use of Evidence, Historical Argumentation
Resources - Forner Chapters 6, Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 6. A set of primary source excerpts: From Foner’s Voices of Freedom: Benjamin Rush, “Thoughts upon Female Education, 1787.”From The Norton Mix: American History: Hannah Griffi ts, “Women’s Role in Boycotting Goods, 1768.” From the History Matters website, “Sarah Osborn Reflects on Her Revolutionary War Experience, 1837.” (This can be found at: http:// historymatters.gmu.edu /d /5833/.) Linda Kerber, “The Republican Mother: Women and the Enlightenment— An American Perspective.” Available via J-Storat: Article Stable URL: http:// www .jstor.org /stable /2712349
Activity - DBQ the College Board’s 1999 American Revolution

Chapter 7 – Founding a Nation 1783-1789

Topics Covered – America under the Confederation, A New Constitution, The Ratification Debate and the Origin of the Bill of Rights, “We the People”
Key Concept – 3.2
Themes: ID- 1, POL- 1, POL- 5, WOR- 2, CUL- 2, CUL- 4

[CR6] The course provides opportunities for students to identify and evaluate diverse historical interpretations
Historical Thinking Skills: Historical Argumentation, Continuity and Change over Time, Periodization
Resources - Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 7, Dollar/Reichard Chapters 6 & 7
Special Activity – In class - watch Sally Hemmings

A Wolf by the Ear - Primary Source Thomas Jefferson

Chapter 8 – Securing the Republic, 1790-1815

Topics Covered – Politics in the Age of passion, the Adams Presidency, Jefferson in Power, the Second War of independence
Key Concept – 3.3
Themes: ID- 5, WXT- 2, WXT- 4, WXT- 6, POL- 2, POL- 5, WOR- 5, ENV- 3, CUL- 2 [CR1b]
Historical Thinking Skills: Historical Argumentation, Historical Causation, Continuity and Change over Time, Contextualization
Assessments Informal assessment of the application of targeted historical thinking skills and quality of arguments and conclusions in two days of class discussions. Scoring of contextualization quiz

Resources - Forner Chapter 8, Primary source images: from Give Me Liberty! Chapter 8 (page numbers refer to 3rd AP Edition): Liberty and Washington, p. 295; Frederick Kemmelmayer’s 1794 painting of Washington, p. 300; an engraving from The Lady’s Magazine and Repository of Entertaining Knowledge from 1792, p. 304; Congressional Pugilists, p. 307; and, The Providential Detection, p. 309

Chapter 9 – The Market Revolution 1800-1840

Topics Covered – A New Economy, Market Society, The Free Individual, and the Limits of Freedom.
Key Concept – 3.3, 4.2
Themes: WXT- 2, WXT- 5, WXT- 6, WXT- 7, PEO- 2, PEO- 3, ID- 5, ID- 6

[CR9]
Historical Thinking Skills: Change and Continuity over Time, Use of Historical Evidence, Comparison Synthesis
Assessment: Informal assessment of the application of targeted historical thinking skills and quality of arguments and conclusions in class discussion. Score the annotations and/or summations to check individual understanding achieved prior to discussion.
Resources - Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 9. Foner, Voices of Freedom, “Complaint of a Lowell Factory Worker.” American Social History Project, “Timetable of Lowell Mills,” http://herb.ashp.cuny.edu/items/show/1807.

PERIOD 4 1800- 1848 [CR2]

Time for the Entire Unit on Period 4

Unit Learning Objectives

Unit Key Concepts

16 Days

POL-2, POL-3, POL-5, POL-6, ID -5, CUL-2, CUL-5, WOR-2 WOR -5, WOR-6, ID-1, ID-2, ID-6, WXT-2, WXT-5, WXT-6, WXT-7, PEO-2, PEO-3, ENV-3

4.1, 4.2, 4.3


Chapter 10 – Democracy in America 1815-1840

Topics Covered – The Triumph of Democracy, Nationalism and Discontents, Nation, Section, and Party, The Age of Jackson, The Bank War and After
Key Concept – 3.3 & 4.1
Themes: WOR- 5, WOR- 6, POL- 6, ENV- 3

[CR5], [CR9]
Historical Thinking Skills: Historical Argumentation, Historical Causation, Continuity and Change over Time
Resources - Forner Chapter 10, Marc Kruman, “The Second American Party System and the Transformation of Revolutionary Republicanism,” Journal of the Early Republic, Vol. 12/No. 4 (Winter 1992), pp. 509– 537. Available on J-Stor., AP College Board 1990 DBQ Jacksonian Democracy
Special Activity – Take home – The 1990 DBQ Jacksonian Democracy can be used to extend this lesson and gain primary document practice.
Chapter 11 - The Peculiar Institution 1840-1877

Chapter 12 – An Age of Reform 1820-1840

Topics Covered –The Old South, Cotton Economy, White Society in the South, Slavery: The “Peculiar Institution”, The Culture of Slavery, Life Under Slavery, Resistance to Slavery, Reform Impulse, The Crusade Against Slavery, Black and White Abolitionism, The Origins of Feminism
Themes: ID- 2, ID- 6, WXT- 2, WXT- 6, PEO- 2, PEO- 5, PEO- 6, POL- 6, WOR- 5, ENV- 3, ENV- 4

[CR 12] The course provides opportunities for students to connect historical developments to specific circumstances of time and place4, and to broader regional, national or global processes
Historical Thinking Skills: Use of Evidence, Historical Causation, Contextualization
Assessment: We will tie together either via discussion or written response the answer(s) to these questions:



  1. How successful were slaves and free African- Americans in protecting their family structures and culture, and in fighting for freedom?

2. Who was willing to help slaves and free African- Americans? Why and how?
Resources – Forner Chapters 11 & 12
Special Activity – Watch La Amistad – Project: Olaudah Equiano 

1996 DBQ: Constitutional/Social Developments 1860-1877



PERIOD 5 1844- 1874 [CR2]

Time for the Entire Unit on Period 5

Unit Learning Objectives

Unit Key Concepts

16 Days

ID -2, ID-6, WXT-2, WXT-6, PEO-2, PEO-5, PEO -6, POL-6, WOR-5, ENV-3, ENV-4

5.1, 5.2, 5.3


Chapter 13 - A House Divided1840-1861

Topics Covered – Manifest Destiny, Popular Sovereignty, Fugitive Slave Act, Crisis and Compromise, Rise of Republican Party, Emergence of Lincoln, The Impending Crisis
Key Concept – 5.2
Themes: ID- 2, ID- 6, WXT- 2, WXT- 6, PEO- 2, PEO- 5, PEO- 6, POL- 6, WOR- 5, ENV- 3, ENV- 4 [CR5]
Historical Thinking Skills: Historical Causation, Comparison, Historical Argument
Assessment: Based on class discussion, each student submits a three to five sentence response indicating which event they believe played the greatest factor in the sectional divide over the issue of slavery.
Resources - Forner Chapters Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 13. Foner, Voices of Freedom: Hinton Helper, “The Impending Crisis.” Dollar/Reichard Chapters 13 & 15
Chapter 14 – The Birth of Freedom: The Civil War, 1861-1865

Topics Covered – First Modern War, the Coming of Emancipation, the Second American Revolution, the Confederate Nation, Turning Points, Rehearsals for Reconstruction and the End of the War
Key Concept: 5.3
Themes: ID- 2, ID- 6, WXT- 2, WXT- 6, PEO- 2, PEO- 5, PEO- 6, POL- 6, WOR- 5, ENV- 3, ENV- 4 [CR8]
Historical Thinking Skills: Historical Causation, Historical Argumentation
Assessment: Written exit ticket is a paragraph analyzing which of the events most impacted the outcome of the Civil War and why.
Resources - Forner Chapters Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 14

PERIOD 6 1865- 1898 [CR2]

Time for the Entire Unit on Period 6

Unit Learning Objectives

Unit Key Concepts

16 Days

ID -2, ID-5, ID-6, WXT-3, WXT-6, PEO-2, PEO-3, PEO -4, PEO-5, PEO-6, POL-3, POL-6, WOR-3, ENV-5, CUL-3, CUL-5, CUL-6

6.2


Chapter 15 – Reconstruction, 1865-1877

Topics Covered – The Meaning of Freedom, Radical reconstruction, The South in Reconstruction, The Grant Administration, The Abandonment of Reconstruction, The New South
Key Concept: 5.3
Themes: ID- 2, ID- 6, WXT- 2, WXT- 6, PEO- 2, PEO- 5, PEO- 6, POL- 6, WOR- 5, ENV- 3, ENV- 4 [CR8]
Historical Thinking Skills: Historical Causation, Comparison, Historical Argumentation
Resources: Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 15. Foner, Voices of Freedom: “Petition of Committee on Behalf of the Freedmen to Andrew Johnson,” “The Mississippi Black Code,” and “A Sharecropping Contract.” Maps from The National Endowment for the Humanities, “The Battle for Reconstruction,” http://civclients.com/nehint/recon/.

Chapter 16 – America’s Gilded Age, 1870-1890

Topics Covered – Second Industrial Revolution, The Transformation of the West, Politics in the Gilded Age, Freedom in the Gilded Age, Labor and the Republic, Populist Challenge, Segregated South, Redrawing the boundaries, Becoming a World Power
Key Concept: 6.1, 6.3
Themes: POL- 6, ENV- 5
[CR7] The course provides opportunities for students to analyze evidence about the past from diverse sources, such as written documents, maps, images, quantative data (charts, graphs, tables), and works of art – Appropriate use of relevant historical evidence.
Historical Thinking Skills: Contextualization, Historical Causation, Use of Evidence, Interpretation
Resources: Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 16. Shi and Mayer, For the Record, selections as indicated at right. Letter from Office of Indian Affairs Assistant Commissioner E. B. Meritt to Special Indian Agent L. A. Dorrington, National Archives identifier: 296346, docsteach .org. Video/audio suggestion: Stories in the words of Zitkala- Sa, YouTube .com. These tell the story of a Sioux woman who attended school at White’s Manual Labor Institute in Indiana founded by Quakers. Video suggestion: Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee (HBO, 2007), TV- 14, 132 minutes. (Instructors might consider adding a movie night as an optional activity for APUSH students if the film is too long to show during class.)
Themes: WXT- 3, WXT- 6, WOR- 3, POL- 6 [CR8]
Historical Thinking Skills: Historical Causation, Comparison
Resources: Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 16.

Chapter 17 - Freedom’s Boundaries at Home and Abroad 1890-1900

Topics Covered – The Populists Challenge, the Segregated South, Redrawing the Boundaries, Becoming a World Power
Key Concept: 6.2
Themes: ID- 5, WXT- 5, WXT- 7, PEO- 6 [CR9]
Historical Thinking Skills: Historical Causation, Continuity and Change over Time
Assessment: Students complete the above activity and share their findings with the class. Groups receive participation points for providing accurate information during discussion on the topic.
Special Activity – The College Board 1994 DBQ Expansionism, Old and New
Resources – Foner, Give Me Liberty,Chapter 17. The College Board 1994 DBQ Expansionism, Old and New


SECOND SEMESTER
PERIOD 7 1890- 1945, PART A [CR2]

Time for the Entire Unit on Period 7

Unit Learning Objectives

Unit Key Concepts

12 Days

WXT-3, WXT-5, WXT-6, WXT-7, WXT-8, WOR-3, ENV-5, CUL-5, POL-3

7.1.I, 7.1.II, 7.2.II, 7.3.II



Chapter 18 – The Progressive Era, 1900-1916

Topics Covered – The Urban Age and Consumer Society, Varieties of Progressivism, the Politics of Progressives, the Progressive Presidents
Key Concept: 6.2, 7.1
Themes: WXT- 3, WXT- 5, WOR- 3, WXT- 7

[CR3] The course provides opportunities for students to apply detailed and specific knowledge (such as names, chronology, facts, and events) to broader historical understandings.
[CR11] The course provides opportunities for students to compare historical developments across or within societies in various chronological and geographical contexts. – Comparison
Historical Thinking Skills: Continuity and Change over Time, Comparison, Contextualization
Resources - Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 18. Two or more images, possibly including: Six O’Clock, Winter, from Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 18 (p. 727 in 3rd AP Edition). Additional Ashcan School paintings from The Metropolitan Museum of Art, “The Ashcan School,” http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/ashc/hd_ashc.htm. Hudson River School paintings from The Metropolitan Museum of Art, “The Hudson River School,” http:// www. metmuseum.org/toah/hd/hurs/hd_hurs. htm. Dollar/Reichard Chapter 17
Themes: ID-2, ID-5, ID-6, WXT-5, PEPO-2, PEO-3, PEO-5, PEO-6

[CR13b] The course provides opportunities for students to apply insights about

the past to other historical contexts or circumstances, including the present. – Synthesis


Historical Thinking Skills: Continuity and Change over Time, Comparison, Contextualization

Chapter 19 – The United States and World War I, 1916-1920

Topics Covered – The Era of Intervention, America and the Great War, the War at Home, The Race Problems, Who is an American, 1919 Upheaval in America
Themes: WOR- 6, WOR- 7, ENV- 5, POL- 6 [CR7]
Historical Thinking Skills: Use of Evidence
Assessment: Assessment of the presentations and explanation of the materials to the class.
Resources – Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 19. A selection of cartoons, possibly including: Cartoon for McKinley entitled “Declined with Thanks,” originally from Puck Magazine, available at HarpWeek, “1900: McKinley vs. Bryan,” http://elections. harpweek.com/1900/cartoon- 1900- Medium.asp?UniqueID=43&Year=. Roosevelt cartoon entitled “The World’s Constable,” originally in Judge. This is available in Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 18 (p. 773 in 3rd AP Edition.). Woodrow Wilson cartoon from The Olden Times, “Woodrow Wilson Steers Toward Justice (While Avoiding both War & Intervention)” http://theoldentimes .com/ antiwarwilson .html. A cartoon on William Howard Taft from Ohio Memory Collection, “William Howard Taft Foreign Policy Cartoon” http:// www.ohiomemory.org/cdm/ref/ collection/p267401coll36/id/24052
Themes: WOR- 4, WOR- 7, ID- 3, POL- 6 [CR12]
Historical Thinking Skills: Use of Evidence, Historical Causation, Historical Argumentation, Contextualization
Resources: Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 19.
Special Activity – 1991 DBQ The Fight Over the Treaty of Versailles
PERIOD 7 1890- 1945, PART B [CR2]

Time for the Entire Unit on Period 7

Unit Learning Objectives

Unit Key Concepts

18 Days

WOR-3, WPR-4, WOR-7, ID-3, ID-6, ID-7, ID-8, WXT-3, WXT-5, WXT-8, POL-2, POL-3, POL-4, POL-5, CUL-3, CUL-5, CUL-6, CUL-7

7.1, 7.2, 7.3


Chapter 20 – From Business Culture to the Great Depression, 1920-1932

Topics Covered – The Business of America, Business & Government, the Birth of Civil Liberties, A Conflict of Cultures, The Great Depression
Key Concepts: 7.1, 7.2
Themes: WOR- 3, ID- 7, WXT- 3, WXT- 5, POL- 3, WXT- 8, POL- 2, POL- 4, ID- 3, UL- 5 [CR5]
Historical Thinking Skills: Historical Argumentation, Use of Evidence
Resources - Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 20. Images from Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 20, (also available on the instructor’s disc) and from Duke University Libraries, “Emergence of Advertising in America, 1850– 1920” http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/eaa/.
Themes: ID- 6, ID- 8, WXT- 3, WXT- 5, CUL- 3, CUL- 6, CUL-7

[CR13a] The course provides opportunities for students to combine disparate, sometimes contradictory evidence from primary sources and secondary works in order to create a persuasive understanding of the past. – Synthesis
Historical Thinking Skills: Historical Causation, Comparison, Contextualization, Historical Argumentation, Synthesis
Resources: Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 20. College Board, “AP Central: AP U.S. History Course Homepage,” http://apcentral .collegeboard .com /apc /public/ courses /teachers corner /3501 .html. Use the PDF file “A.P. U.S. History Document-Based Questions,” which has all of the DBQs from the first year the exam was given until 1996, when they began posting them online. This exercise draws on the 1986 exam. From Shi and Mayer, For the Record: Harry Emerson Fosdick “Shall Fundamentalists Win?”

Chapter 21 - The New Deal 1932-1940

Topics Covered –Launching the New Deal, The First New Deal , The Grassroots Revolt, The Second New Deal, A Reckoning with Liberty, The Limits of Change, A New Conception of America, Limits and Legacies in the New Deal
Key Concepts – 7.1
Themes: WOR- 3, ID- 7, WXT- 3, WXT- 5, POL- 3 [CR13a]
Historical Thinking Skills: Historical Causation, Comparison, Use of Evidence, Periodization
Resources - , Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 21, Bradford A. Lee, “The New Deal Reconsidered,” The Wilson Quarterly, Vol. 6, No. 2 (Spring, 1982), pp. 62– 76 (available on J-Stor). Dollar/Reichard Chapter 22
Special Activity – Supreme Court Case Project

Chapter 22- Fighting for the Four Freedoms: World War II, 1941-1945

Topics Covered – Fighting a World War, the Home Front, Visions of Postwar Freedom, the American Dilemma, The End of the War
Key Concepts: 7.3
Themes: WOR- 4, WOR- 7, ID- 3, ID- 6, POL- 5 [CR9]
Historical Thinking Skills: Historical Causation, Historical Argumentation, Continuity and Change over Time
Take Home Special Activity – 1988 DBQ the College Board The Decision to Drop the Bomb
Resources: Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 22. Kenneth Paul O’Brien and Lynn Hudson Parson, The Home- Front War: World War II, First Edition, (Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1995). (Chapter titled “Bad News from the Good War: Democracy at Home during World War II” by Roger Daniels.) For released AP tests see: College Board, “AP Central,” http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/members / exam/exam_information/2089.html. For additional materials regarding Japanese internment (and some good photos to use as discussion or bell ringers)

see: Tufts University, “Japanese American Internment,” http://researchguides.library.tufts.edu/content.php?pid=93647&sid=698831.

PERIOD 8 1945- 1980 [CR2]

Time for the Entire Unit on Period 8

Unit Learning Objectives

Unit Key Concepts

18 Days

WOR-3, WOR-4, WOR-7, WOR-8, ENV-5, ID-3, ID-8, POL-2, POL-3, POL-4, POL-7, WXT-3, WXT-5, CUL-5, CUL-6, CUL-7, PEO-3

8.1, 8.2, 8.3


Chapter 23- The United States and the Cold War, 1945-1953

Topics Covered: Origins of the Cold War, The Cold War and the Idea of Freedom, The Truman Presidency, The Anti-communist Crusade
Key Concepts – 7.3, 8.1, 8.
Themes: WOR- 3, WOR- 4, WOR- 7, WOR- 8, ENV- 5 [CR3]
Historical Thinking Skills: Continuity and Change over Time, Comparison, Historical Argumentation, Interpretation, Use of Historical, Evidence

Resources – Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapters 23 and 24. Foner, Voices of Freedom: A Documentary History, “The Truman Doctrine.” Shi and Mayer, For the Record: A Documentary History of America, “Statement on Korean War,” “Letter to Ngo Dinh Diem,” “Eisenhower Doctrine,” and “The Marshall Plan.”

Online resources for research: Teaching American History, “Interactive Timeline of Early Cold War Year,” http://teachingamericanhistory.org/static/neh/ interactives/timeline/. The Wilson Center, “The Cold War Files:

Interpreting History through Documents,” http://legacy.wilsoncenter.org/coldwarfi les / .The Nixon Presidential Library and Museum, “Silent Majority,” http://www.nixonlibrary.gov/forkids/speechesforkids/ silentmajority.php.
Chapter 24 - Affluent Society 1952-2010

Topics Covered - The Golden Age, The Eisenhower Era, The Freedom Movement, The Election of 1960
Key Concept: 7.2
Themes: WXT- 3, WXT- 5, CUL- 5, CUL- 6, CUL- 7, PEO- 3

[CR10] The course provides opportunities for students to investigate and construct different models of historical periodization.
Historical Thinking Skills: Use of Historical Evidence, Comparison, Periodization, Synthesis
Resources - Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 24. Recording of “Little Boxes” (available on YouTube and iTunes) by Malvina Reynolds and printed lyrics (available through Google).
Chapter 25 - The Sixties 1960-1968

Topics Covered –The Freedom Movement, The Kennedy Years, Lyndon Johnsons Presidency, The Changing Black Movement, Vietnam and the New Left, The New Movements and the Right Revolution, 1968
Key Concepts– 8.2, 8.3
Themes: ID- 8, POL- 3, POL- 4, POL- 7 [CR11]
Critical Thinking Skills: Historical Causation, Use of Historical Evidence, Comparison
Resources - Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapters 23– 25. Public Broadcasting System Learning Media, “The Murder of Emmett Till,” http://illinois.pbslearningmedia.org/ search/?q=Emmett+Till. The Alabama Literacy Test, available from the Public Broadcasting System, “The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow: Voting Then and

Now,” http://www.pbs.org/wnet/jimcrow/ voting_literacy.html.



Themes: POL- 3, POL- 2, POL- 5, POL- 7, ID- 8 [CR10]
Critical Thinking Skills: Periodization, Comparison, Use of Historical, Evidence, Synthesis
Assessment: Students will write a response paragraph outlining Reagan’s response to Great Society from his speech “A Time for Choosing” (often referred to as his “Rendezvous with Destiny” speech) and explain why he gave this speech, and how and why conservatives disagreed with Great Society programs. This will be collected and scored by the teacher.
Resources: Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 25. Lyndon Johnson’s “The Great Society” speech; transcript and audio recording available at: The Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan, “The ‘Great Society’ Speech, President Lyndon Johnson, University of Michigan Commencement, 1964,” http://bentley .umich.edu/exhibits/lbj1964/. Ronald Reagan’s “A Time for Choosing” speech; transcript and video available at: The Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation & Library, “A Time for Choosing”, http://www.reaganfoundation.org/tgcdetail.aspx?p=TG0923RRS&h1=0&h2=0&lm=reagan&args_a=cms&args_ b=1&argsb=N&tx=17366.
Themes: POL- 3, POL- 2, POL- 5, POL- 7, ID- 8 [CR5]
Critical Thinking Skills: Historical Argumentation, Causation, Continuity and Change over Time
Assessment: Informal assessment of the application of targeted historical thinking skills, and quality of arguments and conclusions in class discussion. Score the annotations or summations to check individual understanding achieved prior to discussion.
Resources: Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 25. Allen Matusow, The Unraveling of America: A History of Liberalism in the 1960s (Athens, Georgia: University of Georgia Press, 1984).
Themes: ENV-4, ENV-5 [CR13b]
Critical Thinking Skills: Continuity and Change over Time, Historical Synthesis
Assessment: Students work collaboratively as investigative reporters on this incident and make comparisons to the Love Canal disaster
Resources: Initial student research sources could include the following:

  • Catherine E. Shoichet, “Spill Sprews Tons of Coal Ash into North Carolina River,” CNN US News, February 9, 2014. http://www.cnn.com/2014/02/09/us/north-carolina-coal-ash-spill/

  • Trip Gabriel, “Ash Spill Shows How Watchdog Was Defanged,” New York Times, February 28, 2014.

  • Michael Wines, “North Carolina Says Utility Pumped Millions of Gallons of Wastewater in River,” New York Times, March 20, 2014.

  • Associated Press, “Duke Energy Agrees to Fund Dan River Clean-up,” New York Times, June 9, 2014

PERIOD 9 1980-PRESENT [CR2]

Time for the Entire Unit on Period 9

Unit Learning Objectives

Unit Key Concepts

13 Days

ID-6, ID-7, WXt-3, WXT-7, WXT-8, PEO-2, PEO-3, PEO-7, POL-3, POL-4, POL-7, WOR-3, WOR-7, WOR-8, ENV-5 and CUL-7

8.2.11, 8.2.111, 8.3, 9.1, 9.2, 9.3



Chapter 26- The Triumph of Conservatism 1969-1988

Chapter 27 – Globalization and Its Discontents, 1989-2000

Chapter 28 - September 11 and the Next American Century

Topics Covered – President Nixon, Vietnam and Watergate, the End of the Golden Age, the Rising Tide of Conservatism, the Reagan Revolution, the Post-Cold War World, A New Economy, Culture Wars, Impeachment and the Election of 2000, Freedom and the New Century, the War on Terrorism, An American Empire, the Aftermath of September 11 at Home, the Winds of Change, the Rise of Obama, Learning from History
Key Concepts: 9.1, 9.2, 9.3
Themes: ID- 6, ID- 7, WXT- 7, PEO- 2, PEO- 3, and PEO- 7 [CR7]
Historical Thinking Skills: Use of Evidence, Historical Argumentation, Historical Causation, Continuity and Change over Time, Contextualization
Resources - Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapters 26– 28. In particular, students will need access to graphs, tables, and maps selected from Chapters 26– 28. This could mean working with the text and a list of relevant images. It could also mean delivery of images in digital form.
Themes: WXT- 8, POL- 3, and POL- 4 [CR 7] [CR 8]
Assessments: Assess annotated documents, ranked list, whole- group discussion, and debates.
Historical Thinking Skills: Historical Causation, Contextualization, Use of Evidence, Historical Argumentation
Resources: Foner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapters 26 and 27. A primary source set with excerpts of documents revealing causes of the rise of conservatism: From Give Me Liberty!, Chapter 26: excerpt from Jerry Falwell’s “Listen, America” and the “Visions of Freedom” section on Phyllis Schlafly. From Foner, Voices of Freedom: A Documentary History: Phyllis Schlafly’s “The Fraud of the Equal Rights Amendment,” and Ronald Reagan’s “Inaugural Address.” From The Norton Mix: American History: excerpts from The Power of the Positive Woman by Phyllis Schlafl y, and the Republican Party’s Contract With America. From Shi and Mayer, For the Record: A Documentary History of America: Patrick Buchanan’s Culture War for the Soul of America (1992).
Themes: POL- 7, WOR- 7, and WOR- 8 [CR5]
Historical Thinking Skills: Historical Argumentation, Historical Causation, Continuity and Change over Time
Resources: Forner, Give Me Liberty!, Chapters 27 and 28. Elaine Tyler May, “Security against Democracy,” Journal of American History, vol. 97, no. 4 (2011), pp. 939– 957.
Review
Topics Covered – Europeans Explore and Colonize Americas, The Colonial Period, The Colonist Struggle for Freedom, Formation of a New Nation, First Half of 19th Century, Division and reunion, The Economy Transformed, Modern America Emerges, The United States Becomes a World Power, The United States Assumes Worldwide Responsibilities, Presidential Administrations since WWII, and the Federal Government and Civic Responsibility
Resources – Handouts




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page