Canadian history 11 course outline



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CANADIAN HISTORY 11

COURSE OUTLINE

Inverness Education Centre/Academy

Teacher: Jill Campbell-Jessome

Contact info: phone: 258-3700; email: jill.campbelljessome@srsb.ca

*Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions or concerns regarding the course, or the progress of your child. Assessment information can be accessed through the student/parent portal of the Power School website.



MODULES OF STUDY

Globalization

What has been Canada’s place in the community of nations, and what should Canada’s role be?



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Investigate and assess various traditional and emerging theories regarding the peopling of the Americas.

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Analyse the effects of contact and subsequent colonization.

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Demonstrate an understanding that Canada’s development was influenced by evolving relationship with France, Britain, and the USA.

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Analyse the role played by WWI in shaping Canada’s identity.

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Analyse the role played by WWII in shaping Canada’s identity.

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Analyse the evolution of Canada’s roles in the late twentieth century.






 

Development

How has the Canadian economy evolved in an attempt to meet the wants and needs of all Canada’s peoples?



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Investigate the economic systems of Aboriginal societies in North America.

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Analyse the role played by the Staple Trade in the development of (Colonial) Canada.

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Analyse the relationship between the National Policy and the industrialization of Canada.

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Analyse the role of the free trade debate/issue in Canada’s development.

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Analyse the economic trends and policies that impact on Canada’s current and future development




 Governance

Have governments in Canada, past and present, been reflective of Canadian societies?



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Demonstrate an understanding of how pre-contact and post-contact First nations governing structures and practices were reflective of their societies.

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Demonstrate an understanding of how and why competing French, British, and American governing philosophies merged in BNA.

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Analyse how emerging political and economic structures led to Confederation.

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Evaluate the evolution of federalism in Canada from Confederation to Patriation.

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Analyse the shift from a traditional two-party process to a multi-party process in post-Confederation Canada.

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Demonstrate an understanding of the purpose of the Canadian constitution.



Sovereignty

How have struggles for sovereignty defined Canada and how do they continue to define Canada?



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Demonstrate an understanding that struggles for sovereignty affect countries and people globally.

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Demonstrate an understanding of how desires for sovereignty create conflict and compromise.

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Analyse the struggles of First Nations to re-establish sovereignty.

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Identify and explain the historical and contemporary facts that promoted the emergence of Quebec nationalism.

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Analyse the external factors that have impacted on the struggle for Canadian sovereignty.

Justice

How has Canada struggled for a just and fair society?



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Analyse the contributions of First Nations, France, and Britain to Canada’s legal system.

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Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between land and culture and analyse the effects of displacement.

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Demonstrate an understanding of Canada’s immigration policies and analyse their origins and effects.

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Demonstrate an understanding of how the lack of political and economic power has led to inequities and analyse the responses to these inequities.

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Analyse the evolution of the struggle to achieve rights and freedoms

 



ASSESSMENT

Students are expected to take personal responsibility for their success in school. This can be achieved by being on time for class; coming to class prepared; actively engaging themselves in the learning process by listening, following instructions, participating in class discussions and activities, working with peers, completing assigned work to their personal best, and displaying a positive and cooperative attitude.

Assessment tools may include, but are not limited to, formal and informal observations, tests, written responses (i.e.: short answer, essay), presentations, posters, self-assessments, independent study, etc.

Evaluation:

Projects (including the portfolio) – 30%

Assignments/Classwork – 20%

Quizzes/Tests – 20%

Exam – 30%




 

TEXTBOOK

Canada’s History: Voices and Visions



 

 




 


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