Campus: Lacy Elementary Author(s): Briana Jensen



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Campus: Lacy Elementary

Author(s): Briana Jensen

Date Created / Revised: February 16, 2016

Six Weeks Period: 6th

Grade Level & Course: 4th grade/Social Studies

Timeline:  10 Days

Unit Title: Texas Citizenship (Unit 12)

Lesson # 1-2

Stated Objectives:

TEK # and SE

4.16A Explain the meaning of various patriotic symbols and landmarks of Texas, including the six flags that flew over Texas, the San Jacinto Monument, the Alamo, and various missions.

4.16B Sing or recite “Texas, Our Texas.”

4.17A Identify important individuals who have participated voluntarily in civic affairs at state and local levels such as Adina de Zavala and Clara Driscoll.

4.17B Explain how individuals can participate voluntarily in civic affairs at state and local levels through activities such as holding public officials to their word, writing letters, and participating in historic preservation and service projects.

4.17C Explain the duty of the individual in state and local elections such as being informed and voting.

4.17D Identify the importance of historical figures and important individuals who modeled active participation in the democratic process such as Sam Houston, Barbara Jordan, Lorenzo de Zavala, Ann Richards, Sam Rayburn, Henry B. Gonzalez, James A. Baker III, Wallace Jefferson, and other local individuals.

4.18A Identify leaders in state, local, and national governments, including the governor, local members of the Texas Legislature, the local mayor, U.S. senators, local U.S. representatives, and Texans who have been presidents of the United States.

4.18B Identify leadership qualities of state and local leaders, past and present.

4.21B Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions.

4.22B Incorporate main and supporting ideas in verbal and written communication.

4.22D Create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies.

4.22E Use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation.

4.23A Use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution.


See Instructional Focus Document (IFD) for TEK Specificity

Key Understandings

Historic documents of Texas convey important ideas.

Active participation in the democratic process is very important.


Misconceptions

None identified

Key Vocabulary

Pledge, allegiance, indivisible, citizenship, election, voting, democratic process

Suggested Day

5E Model

Instructional Procedures

(Engage, Explore, Explain, Extend/Elaborate, Evaluate)

Materials, Resources, Notes

Day 1

Engage

  1. Students copy the following sentence stem on

notebook paper or in their journals:

Making a Promise

I promised________________ to ____________

________________________________________

Because I _______________________________



  1. Students complete the sentence stem by reflecting

on a promise they made to someone and why they

made that promise.

  1. Students share their promise with a partner and

explain why they kept their promise or not.

  1. Explain that just like students have made promises to

their family members or friends, as Texans we make

promises to our state.


Day 2

Explore

Display the words to the state song, Texas, Our Texas.

2. Students recite the words to the song through a choral reading, led

by teacher.

3. Play the state song, Texas, Our Texas and ask students to look at

the lyrics while they listen to the song.

4. “Texas Talking Partner” activity: assign each student a partner to

complete the activities listed below.

5. Turn to your “Texas Talking Partner” and write down all the words

used to describe Texas or the Star that symbolizes Texas from the

song. (Answers may include: mighty, wonderful, great, boldest,

grandest, wide, glorious, supremely blest, freeborn, single, emblem

of freedom, free, brave, strong.)

6. Call on each pair of “Texas Talking Partners” to volunteer one

word from their list of descriptive words as the teacher scribes the

complete list on chart paper or the board.

Ask:

Looking at these descriptive words, how do you think the

writer of the song, William J. Marsh, felt about Texas

when he wrote the song in 1924, and do you think he was

loyal (or committed/dedicated) to Texas? (Answers may

include: proud, honored, excited, patriotic, etc. Yes, he was

probably very loyal to Texas.)

7. Explain that students who live in Texas now are very diverse.

Many have lived here their entire lives while others moved here

from other states or countries, but we are all Texans.

Ask:

What makes you proud to be a Texan? Students share their

responses with their “Texas Talking Partner,” and the teacher

takes a few responses at the end of the activity.

Can you find two lines of the song that make a promise?

Students turn to their “Texas Talking Partner” to find a promise

in the song. (Answer: “Mother of heroes, we come your children

true/Proclaiming our allegiance, our faith, our love for you.”)

8. Play the song again and ask students to sing along.

Materials:

Words to the song, Texas, Our Texas

Audio and/or video recording of the song,

Texas, Our Texas

TEKS: 4.16C; 4.21B

Purpose:

The purpose of this section of the lesson is

to expose student to the lyrics of the state

song, to ask students to recite the words

to the song, to identify the descriptive

words in the song, and then to identify the

promise” we make when we sing the song.



  • Students conclude this section of the

Day 3

Explain

1. Display a picture of the Texas flag (or the real flag) and

write the Texas Pledge on the board or chart paper:

Honor the Texas Flag;

I pledge allegiance to thee, Texas, one state under God,

one and indivisible.

2. Distribute the Handout: Analyzing the Texas Pledge (1

per student).

3. Students stand, place their hand on their heart, and

recite the pledge.

4. Students analyze the words in the pledge on their

Handout: Analyzing the Texas Pledge (1 per student)

by identifying synonyms and completing a quick sketch

for the following terms in the pledge: pledge, allegiance,

indivisible.

5. Model the process for students using the quadrant for

pledge.” Explain that a “pledge” is similar to a “promise”



and instruct students to write the word “promise” under

the synonym area for the “pledge quadrant.”

6. Instruct students to draw a quick sketch to reflect the term

pledge.” (This should take 23



minutes, and students

may consult with their “Texas Talking Partner” to come up

with an idea for their quick sketch.)

7. Ask:

What is a synonym for the word allegiance?

(Answers may include words such as loyalty,

commitment, faithfulness, devotion, or

trustworthiness.)

8. Bring the class to a consensus on the BEST synonym by

substituting the term into the pledge. For example, recite

the following, “I promise loyalty to thee, Texas…” or “I

promise devotion to thee, Texas…” and allow students to

select their favorite synonym for the handout.

9. Instruct students to draw a quick sketch to reflect the term

allegiance.” (This should take 23



minutes, and students

may consult with their “Texas Talking Partner” to come up

with an idea for their quick sketch.)

10. Ask:

What is a synonym for the word indivisible?

(Answers may include words such as inseparable,

undividable, united, unified, etc.)

11. Bring the class to a consensus on the BEST synonym by

substituting the term into the pledge. For example, recite the following, “one state under God, one and undividable,” and all allow students to select their favorite synonym for the handout.

Materials:

Picture of the Texas flag for display (or the real flag)

Texas State Library and Archives Commission –

Pledge

https://www.tsl.state.tx.us/ref/abouttx/flagpledge.html

Attachments:

Handout: Analyzing the Texas Pledge (1 per

student)

  • TEKS: 4.16C; 4.21B; 4.22D

Day 4

Elaborate

1. Students choose one person from the Teacher Resource: PowerPoint:

My Pledge to Texas or another Texan who has demonstrated great

civic responsibility.

2. Distribute the Handout: Texas Profile (1 per student).

3. Students complete the handout analyzing their selected Texan’s

personal profile, identify at least 3 contributions they made to local or

state civic affairs, and explain why they chose this person.

4. Distribute the cards from the Teacher Resource: I Pledge to Texas

by… KEY (1 card per student).

5. Students complete one card as an exit ticket showing how they plan to

participate in Texas civics locally or at the state level.

Attachments:

Handout: Texas Profile (1 per student)

Teacher Resource: I Pledge to Texas

by… KEY (cut apart; provide one card 1

  • per student)

Day 5

Evaluate


Create a trifold

analyzing the meaning of the song “Texas, Our Texas” and the

Pledge to the Texas Flag.
1. Distribute the Handout: Tri-fold Organizer (1 per student) to organize

their thoughts to use to create the tri-fold.

2. Once students have completed the Handout: Tri-fold Organizer, check

for understanding and have students make any corrections that need to

be made.

3. Provide each student a white piece of paper and have them fold it into a

Tri-fold

4. Students will transfer the information from the Handout: Tri-fold

Organizer to their Tri-fold.

Materials:

White Paper

Attachments:

Handout: Tri-fold Organizer (1 per

student)

TEKS: 4.16A, 4.16B, 4.16C; 4.17A, 4.17B, 4.17D;

4.22D


Day 6

Engage

1. Write the following statement on the board: “As citizens of Texas, we have a duty to

participate in local and state civic affairs.”

Ask:

What does the phrase “civic affairs” mean? (Answers may vary but lead

students to understand that “civic affairs” could mean public issues or activities such

as voting in elections, running for office, writing your elected officials, volunteering,

etc.)

2. Pair, Square, Share activity:

PAIR:

Organize students into groups of two.

Distribute the Handout: Active Citizen (1 per pair).

Students collaborate with a partner to explain what an active participant in local and

state civic affairs thinks, sees, hears, says, and does.

SQUARE:

Students find another pair to create a square of four students.

SHARE

Pairs share ideas with each other and record new ideas on their handout.

3. Ask students to volunteer responses.

Materials:

butcher paper

markers

Attachments:

Handout: Active Citizen (1 per pair)

TEKS: 4.17BC

Purpose:

The purpose of this activity is to access students’

prior knowledge about being an active participant in

civic affairs. There are no right or wrong answers to

the questions.

Day 7

Explore

1. Students remain in their SQUARES or groups of four.

2. Provide students the Handout: Active Citizens Cards (1 set per group) and the

Handout: Citizen Recorder (1 per group).

3. Remind students that they learned about important individuals who modeled active

participation in civic affairs in the previous lesson. Today, students will examine these

individuals more closely.

4. Students “deal” the cards among the group of four.

5. Taking turns, each student reads his/her card to the group describing Texans who

demonstrated active participation in local and/or state civic affairs and lays the card

face up on the table or desk.

6. After all cards have been read, students collaborate to select the five individuals their

group believes had the greatest impact on Texas.

7. Groups then rank their five individuals as first, second, third, fourth, and fifth based on

their impact on Texas.

8. Groups select one person in the group to record their ideas on the Handout: Citizen

Recorder (1 per group), noting the ranking, a summary statement of each person’s

contribution to Texas, and a thorough explanation of why they chose their #1 ranked

person.

Attachments:

Handout: Active Citizens Cards (1 set per group)

Handout: Citizen Recorder (1 per group)

  • TEKS: 4.17D; 4.18A

Day 8

Explain

1. The teacher should present the accurate information identifying the following:

Name of the current U.S. President

Names of the current U.S. Senators representing Texas

Name of the current U.S. Representatives representing your district

Name of the current State Senator for your district

Name of the current State Representative for your district,

Texans who were President:

Lyndon B. Johnson

George H.W. Bush

George W. Bush

Dwight D. Eisenhower

2. Students confirm any answers they categorized correctly, erase any incorrect answers,

and add correct responses to their handout.

3. Explain that these individuals work hard to contribute to our democracy.

TEKS: 4.18A

Purpose:

The purpose of this section of the lesson is for

students to confirm or correct their original guesses

by identifying current local and state leaders, as well

as Texans who have served as the United States

President.

Day 9

Elaborate

1. iCivics prepares young Americans to become knowledgeable, engaged 21st century

citizens by creating free and innovative educational materials.

2. In 2009, Justice Sandra Day O’Connor founded iCivics to reverse Americans’ declining

civic knowledge and participation. Securing our democracy, she realized, requires

teaching the next generation to understand and respect our system of governance.

3. Organize students into groups of two with one computer for each pair.

4. Students go to the website iCivics to play one of three games that help them work

through the problem-solving process or how to become an active participant in the

democratic process. Activate – Do you have an idea about how to make a positive difference in your

community?

Cast a Vote – What issue do you want to ask candidates about?

Responsibility Launcher – Have you ever wanted to knock some civic sense into

someone?

5. Students use what they learned from the iCivics game to complete the Handout: Good

Citizen or use technology to complete the task.

6. Students draw a picture of themselves being a good citizen.

Materials:

computer/Internet

iCivics: http://www.icivics.org/games

Attachments:

Handout: Good Citizen (1 per student) If computers are not accessible to the students, teacher should demonstrate on the class computer or plan to use this content in a different manner.


Day 10

Evaluate


Write a letter to an elected or appointed official describing an issue in Texas that concerns you.

1. Distribute the Handout: Problem-Solving Process (1 per student).

2. Brainstorm potential issues that elected officials might be able to address.

3. Select one of those issues as the problem students choose to address. Students fill in

step 1: Identify a problem with the issue chosen.

4. Step 2: Gather information: Students gather information about the issue and determine

which elected official might be able to help address this problem. Students or the

teacher may access the following website to determine the appropriate contact

information for their elected official: Who Represents Me?

http://www.fyi.legis.state.tx.us/.

5. Step 3: List and consider options. The teacher assists students in listing several

options for solving the problem.

6. Step 4: The teacher assists students in determining the advantages and disadvantages

of the options in step 3.

7. Step 5: Students select the solution they prefer

8. Step 6: Students implement their solution by writing their chosen elected official a letter

asking them to consider their suggestions for resolving the selected issue.

Students complete the Handout: Pre-Write: Letter to Representative (1 per

student) to prepare their letter.

Students trade letters with a peer to peer edit for the following:

Correct spelling

Correct punctuation

Correct grammar

Correct sentence structure

Students make corrections in the final draft of their letter

9. Step 7: Evaluate the solution. Students wait to get a response from their elected official

to evaluate the effectiveness of their suggestions.

Materials:

computer/Internet

Who Represents Me?: http://www.fyi.legis.state.tx.us/

Attachments:

Handout: Problem-Solving Process (1 per

student).

Handout: Pre-Write: Letter to Representative

TEKS: 4.17B, 4.17C, 4.17E; 4.18A, 4.18B; 4.22B, 4.22D, 4.22E; 4.23A

Purpose:

The purpose of this section of the lesson is to remind

students how to implement the problem-solving

process while also being an active participant in the

democratic process.

Instructional Note:

Depending on how much time it takes to go through

the problem-solving process, students may need tocomplete the writing of their final letter outside of

class as homework.

As an option to infuse technology, teachers may

consider allowing students to type their letters on the

computer or to email the letter.




Accommodations for Special Populations

Accommodations for instruction will be provided as stated on each student’s (IEP) Individual Education Plan for special education, 504, at risk, and ESL/Bilingual.


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