California State University, Fullerton. Department of American Studies Graduate Program



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California State University, Fullerton.

Department of American Studies

Graduate Program

  • Our Students: Backgrounds and Goals

  • Applying to the M.A. Program

  • Advising

  • Graduate Courses

  • The Big Choice: Thesis or Comprehensive Exam

  • M.A. Comprehensive Exam Reading Lists

  • Recent Master's Theses

  • Graduate Assistant Positions

 Our Students: Backgrounds and Goals

Cal State Fullerton's American studies graduate students are a diverse group, coming to study with us from a wide variety of institutions and from regions well beyond Southern California. While some were once our own undergraduates, many have arrived from elsewhere. In recent years, for example, we have graduate students from other CSU campuses, several campuses of the UC system, various private colleges in California, Indiana University, North Carolina State University, S.U.N.Y. Fredonia, and Calvin College, Cornell, Georgetown, and University of Wisconsin, as well as from institutions in South America, Asia, and Europe.

Our graduate program is certainly appropriate for students whose eventual goal is a Ph.D. in American studies or a related field. Indeed, a significant proportion of the roughly 75 students presently enrolled in the master's program intend to go on for a doctorate. We provide special advisement and training tailored to the goals of these students. In recent years, our graduate students have been admitted to Ph.D. programs at Boston University, UC Berkeley, UC Davis, UC Irvine, UCLA, UC San Diego, University of Iowa, Michigan State, Claremont Graduate School, University of Kansas, University of Maryland, University of Michigan, University of Southern California, University of Texas, University of Toronto, and Washington State University.

The department is also quite receptive to applications from students with goals other than eventual doctoral study. Of current students, several are high school teachers who desire advanced training in their subject areas. People from a wide range of other careers see our program as a means of enhancing their job skills, while still others are enrolled regardless of present or planned employment, simply for intellectual challenge and fulfillment.


Applying to the Graduate Program

An applicant should hold or be about to receive a bachelor's degree in American studies or a related field, with at least a 3.0 GPA in undergraduate major courses. A candidate with a bachelor's degree from another field is welcome to apply, but if admitted may be required to take one or more undergraduate courses that will not count toward the master's degree. At least two letters of recommendation and a statement of purpose of around 500 words must accompany every application. Correspondence or conversation with the Graduate Program Adviser before application is advisable. The Graduate Record Examination is not required.

Applications are accepted for admission in fall semester only. All application material must arrive by March 1. Applicants will be notified by the American Studies Graduate Adviser regarding their admission to the American Studies Master's Program by the end of March. Approximately 20 students are admitted each year.

Eligible students may apply for the Margarete Liebe Sekhon Graduate Scholarship, which awards $1,000 to a student accepted for fall semester admission to the American Studies M.A. program.

For further information or application materials, contact Professor Erica Ball, Graduate Program Advisor, by email at eball@fullerton.edu.

Graduate Advising

To request published information about the graduate program or to have an application form mailed to you, please send an email message to Professor Erica Ball, Graduate Advisor: eball@fullerton.edu.

See the University's Graduate Studies web site for more general information about graduate studies at Cal State Fullerton and about financial aid.

The CSUF American Studies masters degree consists of 30 units. Slightly more may be required of a student whose undergraduate major was in an unrelated field.

6 units of American Studies graduate core courses (500-level courses)


  • 12 units of elective courses in American Studies (400 or 500-level courses)

  • 6 units of graduate seminars in related fields (500-level courses)

  • 3 units in a methodological skill course (400 or 500-level courses)

  • 3 units for a terminal exercise, which may be either a master's thesis or a comprehensive exam based on mastery of the department's core graduate reading list

The general objective of the American Studies graduate program is to provide advanced training in the interdisciplinary analysis of American culture as a complex whole in the past and present.

Major emphases in Cal State Fullerton's American Studies M.A. Program:

  • Our graduate program is grounded in a thorough understanding of the concept of culture. It emphasizes cultural pluralism, examining the creative tension between unity and diversity in the American experience.

  • It is self-consciously interdisciplinary, requiring graduate students to integrate knowledge from the humanities and social sciences.

  • It emphasizes the process of historical change, compelling students to trace the past sources of contemporary issues.

It develops advanced research, writing and analytical skills. Through course work, consultation with faculty, and writing a thesis or comprehensive exam, graduate students become familiar with the theories and methods of American culture studies.
Graduate Courses

All 400-level courses carry graduate credit. In addition, we offer the following 500-level courses exclusively for graduate students. Visit individual faculty pages for sample syllabi.



AMST 501- Theory And Methods 
The American Studies movement. Its conceptual and methodological development. The way this development was affected by and in turn reflected larger trends in the culture itself.

AMST 502T - Seminar: Selected Topics 
A particular problem or topic as a case study in the use of interdisciplinary methods in American Studies. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Topics offered in recent years include:

Race in American Studies: Theoretical Approaches to the Study of Racial Formation: Advanced analysis of the ways in which Americans have constructed, defined, represented, and negotiated racial identity and racial hierarchies from the seventeenth century to the present. Although this course takes an historical approach, it is not meant to be a survey.  Instead we will pursue an in-depth analysis of how different cultural historians with differing interdisciplinary specialties have approached the study of racial formation and interracial interactions. It attends to substantive conclusions as well as theoretical and methodological considerations. Erica Ball

Contemporary American Culture: Advanced analysis of the beliefs, practices, and implications of membership in spatial, fictive, and virtual communities of contemporary cultural participation. Critical examination of the increasingly mediated nature of American experience evidenced in post-WWII technology, architecture, communications, and social organization.

Gender and Theory in American Studies: An advanced analysis of enduring patterns and innovative shifts in the ways in which Americans have defined, represented, and negotiated gender identity and gender relations from the seventeenth century to the present. Terri Snyder

Visual Culture: Theories and case studies of how visual imagery has reflected and influenced Americans' sense of nature, time, memory, authenticity, and reality itself. Attention to television, film and painting, but particular emphasis on still photography as cultural evidence. John Ibson

Ethnography and American Culture: Introduction to the pragmatics and politics of ethnographic research on American culture. Students design, conduct, and write up independent fieldwork projects based on interviews and participant-observation. Topics include: research design, interviewing, participant-observation, ethics, cultural analysis, ethnographic writing, and representational genres. Carrie Lane

American Scape, Place, and Architecture: After analyzing space, place, and architecture as concepts and cultural artifacts, the seminar examines how Americans have shaped nature from the seventeenth century to the present.  Emphasizes diversity of architectural expression in a pluralistic society. A reading and research colloquium. Mike Steiner

Theoretical Approaches to Studying Popular Culture: This course will examine new theoretical approaches to the interpretation of American popular culture. It will focus on theories examining the relationship between forms of popular culture (including best-selling novels, television, mass amusements, and advertisements) and the society producing them. Adam Golub and Leila Zenderland

Public Memory: Analyzes narratives of the past encapsulated in museums, memorials, historic preservation sites, living history projects, and popular culture. Emphasizes the cultural politics and packaging of public memory and tensions between national identity and local, ethnic and regional identity narratives. Pam Steinle

American Prejudice in Theory and Actuality: Advanced analysis of prejudice as a cultural process:  cultural construction of unreasonably negative perceptions of others.  Etiology of various forms of intolerance in the American past and present.  Common features of prejudice alongside peculiarities of the holder, target, and moment. John Ibson

Culture and Desire: Theoretical Approaches to the History of the Emotions: Advanced analysis of enduring patterns and innovative shifts in the ways Americans have defined, controlled, and expressed emotions such as anger, lust, shame, pride, fear, jealousy, grief, and joy from the 17th century to the present. Jesse Battan

AMST 596 - Teaching Tutorial 
Prerequisite: AMST 501. Preparation for community college or university teaching. Small group discussion, lecture-discussion, examinations, teaching strategies. Enrollment requires approval of American Studies Graduate Adviser.

AMST 598 - Graduate Thesis 
Prerequisites: graduate standing in American studies and consent of graduate adviser. The writing of a thesis based on original research and its analysis and evaluation.

AMST 599 - Independent Graduate Research 
Prerequisite: graduate standing in American Studies and consent of graduate adviser. May be repeated for credit.

Click here to see descriptions of undergraduate courses

Thesis or Comprehensive Exam?

The final requirement for the American Studies Master’s Degree at CSUF is the writing of either a thesis or a comprehensive essay examination. In both cases, your work will be supervised and evaluated by the three faculty members you have asked to serve on your Master’s committee (one of whom you will ask to serve as chair) and have confirmed on your study plan. In deciding whether to write the thesis or the comprehensive exam, you should consider the following:



Thesis

A thesis in this department is an extended discussion, with a central argument, based on complex analysis of your original research and includes a review of the literature on your topic as well as a historical framework.

With the approval of your committee chair, you enroll in AMST 598 in your final semester of coursework You begin by developing an outline or summary of your topic and how you plan to approach your study and then meeting with your committee for their response and advisement regarding your research and writing plan. Once you have completed your research, you submit drafts of each chapter to your committee chair for their review and circulation to the other two members. Chapters are then revised in response to faculty critique and formatted to University guidelines for theses (the Grad Studies office publishes these guidelines).

Once your committee has approved the final draft, your thesis is submitted to the University thesis reader for evaluation of compliance with University standards. Theses in American Studies are typically well over 100 pages in length and organized into four -six chapters. You can find a listing of titles of completed theses in American Studies on our website.

Comprehensive Exam

MA Comprehensive Exam Guidelines for all exams beginning Fall 2009.

At least one semester before taking their exam, MA candidates must select three of the following categories for their subject fields.  Every candidate must also identify three full-time faculty to serve as MA committee members with each faculty overseeing preparation for one of the three subject fields. With the approval of your committee chair, you enroll in AMST 599 in your final semester of coursework As you read through the works on the list, you meet independently with the members of your committee for discussion and guidance.

The subject fields are:

  • Expressive Forms

  • Gender and Sexuality

  • Institutions and Ideals

  • The National and the Global

  • Natural and Built Environments

  • Race, Ethnicity, and Class Formation

  • Work, Consumption, and Leisure

Book lists for all subject fields, each arranged in chronological order, can be found here: MA Comprehensive Exam Reading Lists.

In consultation with the faculty members on his or her committee, a candidate must select and read a minimum of ten books from each of the three chosen categories. Also, in consultation with faculty, a student may substitute a maximum of two books outside the list for each subject field. 

Candidates will have four days (four consecutive 24 hour periods) to write three essays—one essay for each of the chosen subject fields.  Each essay must be a minimum of ten double-spaced pages. 

The faculty member responsible for each section of the exam will provide two questions for that section.  The two questions for each section will be of two types:

A. A question asking students to examine scholarly methods of understanding cultural processes. These are questions of theory and method, requiring students to critically evaluate how scholars approach evidence and how scholars have explored this subject field.

B. A question asking students to examine cultural processes in history.  These are questions of content,requiring students to analyze the dynamics of cultural interaction and changeover time.

To insure methodological and historical coverage, students must choose one A-type question for any subject field and one B-type question for another subject field. They may select either A or B for the remaining subject field. 

Last question/answer: "Once I’ve decided, declared on my study plan, and enrolled in AMST 599 or 598, can I change my decision?" The answer here is yes, however the farther along you are (i.e., actual enrollment in AMST 598),the more complicated the process, so it is not an decision to be undertaken lightly. If you find yourself considering such a change, contact the Graduate Adviser immediately to discuss your options and, if necessary, revise your study plan.
M.A. Exam Reading Lists http://amst.fullerton.edu/academics/exam_lists.asp
At least one semester before taking their exam, MA candidates must select three of the following categories for their subject fields.  Every candidate must also identify three full-time faculty to serve as MA committee members with each faculty overseeing preparation for one of the three subject fields. The subject fields are:

  • 1.  Expressive Forms

  • 2.  Gender and Sexuality

  • 3.  Institutions and Ideals

  • 4.  The National and the Global

  • 5.  Natural and Built Environments

  • 6.  Race, Ethnicity, and Class Formation

  • 7.  Work, Consumption, and Leisure



Select a field name to see the books on that list, arranged in chronological order, or click here for a PDF version of all seven lists.

In consultation with the faculty members on his or her committee, a candidate must select and read a minimum of ten books from each of the three chosen categories. Also, in consultation with faculty, a student may substitute a maximum of two books outside the list for each subject field. 

Candidates will have four days (four consecutive 24 hour periods) to write three essays—one essay for each of the chosen subject fields.  Each essay must be a minimum of ten double-spaced pages. 

The faculty member responsible for each section of the exam will provide two questions for that section.  The two questions for each section will be of two types:

A. A question asking students to examine scholarly methods of understanding cultural processes. These are questions of theory and method, requiring students to critically evaluate how scholars approach evidence and how scholars have explored this subject field.

B. A question asking students to examine cultural processes in history.  These are questions of content, requiring students to analyze the dynamics of cultural interaction and change over time.

To insure methodological and historical coverage, students must choose one A-type question for any subject field and one B-type question for another subject field.  They may select either A or B for the remaining subject field. 

MA COMPREHENSIVE EXAM READING LISTS

I. Expressive Forms

David D.  Hall. Worlds of Wonder, Days of Judgment: Popular Religious Belief in Early New England. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1990.

Karen Halttunen. Murder Most Foul: The Killer and the American Gothic Imagination. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1998.

Shane and Graham White. Stylin’: African American Expressive Culture from Its Beginnings to the Zoot Suit. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1998.

Philip Deloria. Playing Indian. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1998.

Bernard Herman. Town House: Architecture and Material Life in the Early American City, 1780-1830. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2005.

Jane Tompkins. Sensational Designs: The Cultural Work of American Fiction, 1790-1860. New York: Oxford University Press, 1985.

Scott Reynolds Nelson. Steel Drivin’ Man: John Henry, the Untold Story of an American Legend.  New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.

Shelly Fisher Fishkin. Was Huck Black? Mark Twain and African American Voices.  New York: Oxford University Press,1993.

Laura Wexler. Tender Violence: Domestic Visions in an Age of U.S. Imperialism. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2000.

Kathy Peiss. Hope in a Jar: The Making of America’s Beauty Culture. New York: Holt, 1998.

Sarah Schrank. Art and the City: Civic Imagination and Cultural Authority in Los Angeles.   Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008.

Michael Denning. The Cultural Front: The Laboring of American Culture in the Twentieth Century.  Brooklyn: Verso, 1997.

Lary May. The Big Tomorrow: Hollywood and the Politics of the American Way. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000.

Eric Avila. Popular Culture in the Age of White Flight: Fear and Fantasy in Suburban Los Angeles.  Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004.

Tricia Rose. Black Noise: Rap Music and Black Culture in Contemporary America.  Middletown, Connecticut: Wesleyan University Press, 1994.

Victoria Pitts. In the Flesh: The Cultural Politics of Body Modification. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.

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II. Gender and Sexuality

Laurel Thatcher Ulrich. A Midwife’s Tale: The Life of Martha Ballard, Based on Her Diary, 1785-1812.  New York: Alfred Knopf, 1990.

Clare Lyons. Sex Among the Rabble: An Intimate History of Gender & Power in the Age of Revolution, Philadelphia, 1730-1830. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2006.

Albert Hurtado. Intimate Frontiers: Sex, Gender, and Culture in Old California. Albuerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1999.

Thomas Foster. Sex & the Eighteenth-Century Man: Massachusetts & the History of Sexuality in America.  Boston, Mass.: Beacon Press, 2006.

Nancy Cott. The Bonds of Womanhood: ‘Woman’s Sphere’ in New England, 1780-1835, New Haven: Yale University Press, 1978.

Andrea Tone. Devices and Desires: A History of Contraceptives in America. New York: Hill and Wang, 2001.

Christine Stansell. City of Women: Sex and Class in New York, 1789-1860. New York: Alfred Knopf, 1986.

Glenda Gilmore. Gender and Jim Crow: Women and the Politics of White Supremacy in North Carolina, 1896-1920. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1996.

George Chauncey. Gay New York: Gender, Urban Culture, and the Makings of the Gay Male World, 1890-1940. New York: Basic Books, 1994.

John Kasson. Houdini, Tarzan, and the Perfect Man: The White Male Body and the Challenge of Modernity in America. New York: Hill & Wang, 2001.

Martin Summers. Manliness and Its Discontents: The Black Middle Class and the Transformation of Masculinity. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2003.

Elizabeth Kennedy. Boots of Leather, Slippers of Gold: The History of a Lesbian Community. New York: Routledge, 1993.

Miriam Reumann. American Sexual Character: Sex, Gender, and National Identity in the Kinsey Reports. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2005.

Amy Farrell. Yours in Sisterhood: Ms. Magazine and the Promise of Popular Feminism. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998.

Shirley Lim. A Feeling of Belonging: Asian American Women’s Public Culture, 1930-1960. New York: New York University Press, 2006.

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III. Institutions and Ideals

Jill Lepore. The Name of War: King Philip’s War and the Origins of American Identity New York: Knopf, 1998.

Nancy Cott. Public Vows: A History of Marriage and the Nation. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2000.

Albert Raboteau. Slave Religion: The “Invisible Institution” in the Antebellum South. New York: Oxford University Press, 1978.

Walter Johnson. Soul by Soul: Life inside the Antebellum Slave Market. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1999.

Alfred Young. The Shoemaker and the Tea Party: Memory and the American Revolution. Boston: Beacon Press, 1999.

Drew Faust. This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2008.

David Henkin. The Postal Age: The Emergence of Modern Communications in Nineteenth Century America. Chicago: University of Chicago, 2006.

Louis Menand. The Metaphysical Club:  A Story of Ideas in America. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2001.

Joan Jacobs Brumberg. Kansas Charley: The Boy Murderer. New York: Viking, 2003.

Ellen Herman. Kinship by Design: A History of Adoption in the Modern United States. Chicago: University of Chicago, 2008.

Sarah Igo.  The Averaged American: Surveys, Citizens, and the Making of a Mass Public. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2007.

William Graebner. Coming of Age in Buffalo: Youth and Authority in the Postwar Era. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1990.

Lisa McGirr. Suburban Warriors: The Origins of the New American Right. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2001.

Kathryn Dudley. Debt and Dispossession: Farm Loss in America’s Heartland. Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2002.

Anne Fadiman. The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1997.

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IV. The National and the Global

Richter, Daniel K.  Facing East From Indian Country: A Native History of Early America. 
Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2001.

Rediker, Markus.  The Slave Ship: A Human History.  New York: Penguin, 2008.

Armitage, David.  The Declaration of Independence: A Global History.  Cambridge: Harvard 
University Press, 2008.

Kuo Wei Tchen, John. New York Before Chinatown: Orientalism and the Shaping of American Culture, 1776-1882.  Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2001.

Kaplan, Amy. The Anarchy of Empire in the Making of U.S. Culture.  Cambridge: Harvard 
University Press, 2003.

Sanchez, George.  Becoming Mexican American: Ethnicity, Culture, and Identity in Chicano Los Angeles, 1900-1945.  Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995.

Jacobson, Matthew Frye.  Special Sorrows: The Diasporic Imagination of Irish, Polish, and Jewish Immigrants in the United States.  Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002.

Azuma, Eiichiro. Between Two Empires: Race, History, and Transnationalism in Japanese America.  Oxford: Oxford University Pres, 2005.

Yung, Judy.  Unbound Feet: A Social History of Chinese Women in San Francisco.  Berkeley: 
University of California Press, 1995.

Schivelbusch, Wolfgang. Three New Deals: Reflections on Roosevelt's America, Mussolini's Italy, and Hitler's Germany, 1933-1939.  New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2007.

Seigel, Micol.  Uneven Encounters: Making Race and Nation in Brazil and the United States.  
Durham: Duke University Press, 2009.

Wagnleitner, Reinhold.  Coca-Colonization and the Cold War: The Cultural Mission of the United States in Austria after the Second World War.  Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1994.

Von Eschen, Peggy. Satchmo Blows Up the World: Jazz Ambassadors Play the Cold War.  
Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2004.

McAlister, Melani.  Epic Encounters: Culture, Media, & U.S. Interests in the Middle East since 1945, Updated Edition, With a Post-9/11 Chapter.  Berkeley: University of California Press, 2005.

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V. Natural and Built Environments

William Cronon.Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England. New York: Hill and Wang, 2003.

Gabrielle M. Lanier. The Delaware Valley in the Early Republic: Architecture, Landscape, and Regional Identity.  Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2005.

Michael Lewis, ed.  American Wilderness: A New History. New York: Oxford University Press, 2007.

Frieda Knobloch. The Culture of Wilderness: Agriculture as Colonization in the American West. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1996.

John F. Sears. Sacred Places: American Tourist Attractions in the Nineteenth Century.  New York: Oxford University Press, 1989.

Dolores Hayden. Building Suburbia: Green Fields and Urban Growth, 1820-2000.  New York: Pantheon Books, 2003.

Patricia Nelson Limerick.  The Legacy of Conquest: The Unbroken Past of the American West.  New York: W. W. Norton, 1987; new edition, 2006.

Donald Worster. Dust Bowl: The Southern Plains in the 1930s. New York: Oxford University Press, 1979.

Phoebe Kropp.  California Vieja: Culture and Memory in a Modern American Place. Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2008.

Don Mitchell.  The Lie of the Land: Migrant Workers and the California Landscape.  Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2000. 

Kai Erikson.  Everything in its Path: Destruction of Community in the Buffalo Creek Flood.  New York: Simon and Schuster, 1976.

Jane Jacobs. The Death and Life of Great American Cities. New York: Random House, 1961. 

Thomas Sugrue.  The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit. 
Princeton:  Princeton University Press, 1996.

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VI.  Race, Ethnicity, and Class Formation

Morgan, Edmund S.  American Slavery, American Freedom:  The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia.  New York:  Norton, 1975.

Morgan, Jennifer L.  Laboring Women:  Reproduction and Gender in New World Slavery.  Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2004.

Pascoe, Peggy. What Comes Naturally: Miscegenation Law and the Making of Race in America.  New York: Oxford University Press, 2008.

Sweet, John Wood. Bodies Politic: Negotiating Race in the American North, 1730-1830.  Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003.

Stauffer, John. The Black Hearts of Men: Radical Abolitionists and the Transformation of Race.  Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2002.

Pitti, Steven J. The Devil in Silicon Valley:  Northern California, Race, and Mexican Americans.  Princeton:  Princeton University Press, 2003.

West, Eliot. The Contested Plains: Indians, Goldseekers, and the Rush to Colorado.  Lawrence:  University Press of Kansas, 2000.

Welke, Barbara.  Recasting American Liberty: Gender, Race, Law, and the Railroad Revolution, 1865-1920.  New York:  Cambridge University Press, 2001.

Jacobson, Matthew Frye.  Whiteness of a Different Color: European Immigrants and the Alchemy of Race.  Cambridge:  Harvard University Press, 1999.

Blight, David.  Race and Reunion:  The Civil War in American Memory.  Cambridge:    Belknap Press, 2002.

Gordon, Linda. Great Arizona Orphan Abduction. Cambridge: Harvard University Press,  2001.

Leong, Karen.  The China Mystique:  Pearl S. Buck, Anna Mae Wong, Mayling Soong, and the Transformation of American Orientalism.  Berkeley:  University of California Press, 2005.

Ngai, Mai. Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America.  Princeton:  Princeton University Press, 2005.

Dudziak, Mary.  Cold War Civil Rights:  Race and the Image of American Democracy.  Princeton:  Princeton University Press, 2002.

Singh, Nikhil Pal.  Black is a Country: Race and the Unfinished Struggle for Democracy. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2004.

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VII.  Work, Consumption, and Leisure

Daniels, Bruce. Puritans at Play: Leisure and Recreation in Colonial New England. New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 1996.

Breen, T.H.  The Marketplace of Revolution: How Consumer Politics Shaped American Independence. New York: Oxford University Press, 2005.

White, Shane. Stories of Freedom in Black New York. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 2007.

Hunter, Tera. To ’Joy My Freedom: Southern Black Women’s Lives and Labors after the Civil War. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1998.

Rosenzweig, Roy. Eight Hours for What We Will: Workers and Leisure in an Industrial City, 1870-1920. Cambridge, Mass: Cambridge University Press, 1985.

Levine, Lawrence. Highbrow/Lowbrow: The Emergence of Cultural Hierarchy in America. Cambridge, Mass:Harvard University Press, 1990.

Garvey, Ellen Gruber. The Adman in the Parlor: Magazines and the Gendering of Consumer Culture, 1880s to 1910s. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996. 

Peiss, Kathy. Cheap Amusements: Working Women and Leisure in Turn-of-the-Century New York. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1986.

May, Lary. Screening out the Past: The Birth of Mass Culture and the Motion Picture Industry. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1983.

Oriard, Michael. Reading Football: How the Popular Press Created an American Spectacle. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998.

Alamillo, Jose. Making Lemonade out of Lemons: Mexican American Labor and Leisure in a California Town 1880-1960.  Urbana, University of Illinois Press, 2006.

Newman, Kathy. Radio Active: Advertising and Consumer Activism, 1935-1947. Berkeley: University ofCalifornia Press, 2004.

Spigel, Lynn.  Make Room for TV: Television and the Family Ideal in Postwar America,  Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992.

Cohen, Lizabeth. A Consumer’s Republic: The Politics of Mass Culture in Postwar America.  New York: Vintage, 2003.


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