California State Rehabilitation Council Annual Report 2010



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California

State Rehabilitation Council

Annual Report

2010

(Text Version)







Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor

State of California


Health and Human Services Agency




Anthony "Tony" P. Sauer, EMMDS

State Director

Department of Rehabilitation

721 Capilol Mall

Sacramento, CA 95814

(916) 324-1313 Voice

(916) 558-5807 TTY

(916) 558-5806 Fax



Honorable Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor

Lynnae M. Ruttledge, RSA Commissioner

As Director of the California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), and as an ex officio member of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), it is my pleasure to join in presenting the SRC's 2010 Annual Report to you and other interested parties.

During these grave economic times, it is more critical than ever for the DOR and the SRC to continue the partnership we have developed over the years. The cornerstone of this partnership is strong two-way communication and collaboration. In accordance with its federal mandates, the SRC shares with the DOR its findings and recommendations. The DOR, in turn, seeks the guidance of the SRC at key decision-making points in the development and implementation of its plans, programs and policies. This partnership continues to provide a consumer-driven orientation to California's vocational rehabilitation service delivery system.

In this, the 20th Anniversary year of the Americans with Disabilities Act, we celebrate how far we've come; while acknowledging the progress still needed to achieve equality, accessibility and independence for Californians with disabilities.


Anthony “Tony” P. Sauer, EMMDS

Director

California Department of Rehabilitation



Letter from the SRC Chair

The California State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) is pleased to present to you and all stakeholders the Council's Annual Report for Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2010 (October 1, 2009 -- September 30, 2010). The SRC is proud of the successful outcomes made possible through its ongoing collaborative efforts with the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR). The primary focus of this partnership is to provide effective employment preparation, access and opportunities for Californians with disabilities, served by the DOR. This report summarizes the shared efforts of the SRC and the DOR over the past year, and exemplifies how a true collaboration with stakeholders can lead to exciting and rewarding employment outcomes for Californians with disabilities.


Clearly, this year has presented all of us with unprecedented fiscal challenges. Yet, as a result of a very successful series of State Plan Public Hearings and many new American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funded projects, the SRC and DOR have been able to create new paths to employment, aimed at meeting the emerging needs of individuals with disabilities.
Having the pleasure and honor of serving as a member of the SRC for the past four years, I am proud of the efforts of the SRC and DOR to carry out its mission to serve Californians with disabilities. I believe our continuing joint efforts to overcome barriers to employment for individuals with disabilities will serve to enhance the lives of all Californians.
Brian Connors, Chair

California State Rehabilitation Council



The Overall Picture
The State of California, much as the country as a whole, continued its economic struggles in 2010. The California Employment Development Department (EDD) reported a 12.4% seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for September, the final month of Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2010. This is greater than the national reported rate of 9.6% for the same time period.
Moreover, while the national unemployment rate showed a slight recovery over the September 2009 figures, declining from 9.8 to 9.6 percent, California's September 2009 to September 2010 unemployment rate increased slightly – rising from 12.1% to 12.4%, and widening the gap between the employment picture in California and the country as a whole.
Excerpts from the September 2010 EDD California Labor Market Review indicate the following:
California non-farm businesses have lost 43,700 jobs in payrolls since September 2009. Nationwide, non-farm payrolls were down 95,000 jobs (0.1 percent ) over the month and up 344,000 jobs (0.3 percent ) over the year. In comparison, California jobs were down 63,600 (0.5 percent) over the month and down 43,700 jobs (0.3 percent) over the year.
Added to the overall economic challenges, California state government struggled through a year that witnessed unprecedented state budget shortfalls in the billions, state agency furloughs that reduced the available work hours (and employee paychecks) by roughly 15%, and a record-setting delay in passage of the State Fiscal Year 2010-2011 budget that stretched past the end of the Federal Fiscal Year, more than 100 days late. This historic delay meant bills for some state vendor services and goods could not be paid for the entire final quarter of the Federal Fiscal Year, and the ability to purchase certain new services and goods was likewise frozen.
DOR in 2010
The employees of the California DOR, including more than 750 rehabilitation counselors in 85 offices throughout the state, exemplify its mission:

The California Department of Rehabilitation works in partnership with consumers and other stakeholders to provide services and advocacy resulting in employment, independent living and equality for individuals with disabilities.

In spite of a year of extraordinary challenges within state government and throughout the California economy, the employees of the DOR, in particular the rehabilitation counselors, continued to serve the DOR consumers and fulfill their mission. During FFY 2010, the DOR served 113,890 consumers; processed 38,982 new applications, wrote 25,458 new Individualized Plans for Employment (IPEs), and achieved successful employment outcomes for 10,719 DOR consumers.
DISCLAIMER: At the direction of RSA, this report contains the preliminary data not yet validated for FFY 2010 (October 1, 2009 - September 30, 2010). The validated data will not be available until early 2011. If substantive changes are found, this report will be updated.
The Year at a Glance
Applications – 38,982

Waiting List – 133

Pre-Plan – 13,034

Accepted – 33,006

New Plans – 25,458

In Plan – 59,725

Total Open (as of September 30, 2010) – 72,759

Total Closed – 41,131

Closed - Employed – 10,719

Closed - Not Employed – 15,567


How DOR Measured Up
The federal Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) requires states to track and report on a series of benchmarks, commonly referred to as Standards and Indicators. RSA requires each State to pass a minimum of two out of three "primary indicators" and four out of six overall indicators. Based on preliminary raw data (subject to validation), California passed the required two of the three primary indicators, but only achieved three of the four overall indicators.
The preliminary raw data shows the following:
Primary Indicators Met


  • The percentage of successfully employed consumers who obtained competitive employment was 86.8%, exceeding the RSA Benchmark of 72.6% (Performance Indicator 1.3).




  • The percentage of the successfully employed consumers who have a significant disability was 99.8%, far exceeding the RSA Benchmark of 62.4% (Performance Indicator 1.4).


Additional Indicator Met


  • The percentage of successfully employed consumers who are self-supporting is 67.5%, again exceeding the RSA Benchmark of 53% (Performance Indicator 1.6).


Indicators Not Met


  • In 2010 the DOR achieved 886 fewer employment outcomes than in 2009. RSA requires states to achieve successful employment for at least as many consumers as the preceding year. (Performance Indicator 1.1)




  • The percentage of total closures whose cases were closed because they were successfully employed was 42.2%. The Benchmark for RSA is 55.8%. (Performance Indicator 1.2)




  • California’s successfully employed case closures earned, on average, 49.2% of the California 2010 average hourly wage of $24.65, as identified by the US Department of Labor. The RSA Benchmark is at least 52% (Performance Indicator 1.5).



Who DOR Served
California's population is among the most diverse in the nation. Consequently, there is a tremendous diversity in the population DOR serves. In 2010, DOR identified 12 primary languages spoken by its consumers. This is the identified language in which they primarily communicate, and does not include those who are bilingual. As can be expected from a border state, Spanish is the most common non-English language spoken, with 4,547 Spanish-speaking consumers in the total DOR caseload of 113,890. The second most prevalent primary language was American Sign Language, the primary form of communication for 3,537 DOR consumers. Rounding out the top five primary languages spoken are Chinese, Vietnamese, and Tagalog. Again, these reflect only those whose primary languages are other than English, and does not reflect the number of consumers with some level of English-speaking ability.
Consumers who achieved employment success this year are working an average of 30.46 hours a week. The wages of this year's successfully employed consumers average $12.33 per hour.
The following tables provide a breakdown of each demographic segment served by DOR.
DISCLAIMER: At the direction of RSA, this report contains the preliminary raw data not yet validated for FFY 2010 (October 1, 2009 - September 30, 2010). The validated data will not be available until early 2011. If substantive changes are found, this report will be updated. Please note: Total caseload includes everyone who applied or was served during the year, not just active cases.
Statewide by Age Group

ALL: 113,890 total caseload, of which 10,719 (9.4%) closed as successfully employed

19 or Younger: 18,967 (16.6% of the total caseload), of which 1,374 (7.2% of consumers in this age group) closed as successfully employed

Ages 20-29: 28,315 (24.9% of the total caseload), of which 3,203 (11.3% of consumers in this age group) closed as successfully employed

Ages 30-39 17,219 (15.1% of the total caseload), of which 1,647 (9.6% of consumers in this age group) closed as successfully employed

Ages 40-49: 23,732 (20.8% of the total caseload), of which 2,021 (8.5% of consumers in this age group) closed as successfully employed

Ages 50-59: 19,584 (17.2% of the total caseload), of which 1,631 (8.3% of consumers in this age group) closed as successfully employed

Age 60 or Older: 6,073 (5.3% of the total caseload), of which 843 (13.9% of consumers in this age group) closed as successfully employed


Statewide by Gender

ALL: 113,890, of which 10,719 (9.4%) closed as successfully employed

Female: 48,354 (42.4% of the total caseload), of which 4,238 (8.8% of this group) closed as successfully employed

Male: 65,339 (57.3% of the total caseload), of which 6,481 (9.9% of this group) closed as successfully employed

Not Reported: 197 of total cases, none closed as successfully employed
Statewide by Ethnicity

ALL: 113,890, of which 10,719 (9.4%) closed as successfully employed

American Indian*: 742 (0.7% of the total caseload), of which 73 (9.8% of this group) closed as successfully employed

Asian: 4,769 (4.2% of the total caseload), of which 495 (10.4% of this group) closed as successfully employed

Black: 21,835 (19.2% of the total caseload), of which 1,677 (7.7% of this group) closed as successfully employed

Hispanic: 29,676 (26.1% of the total caseload), of which 2,954 (10.0% of this group) closed as successfully employed

Multi: 2,644 (2.3% of the total caseload), of which 266 (10.1% of this group) closed as successfully employed

Not Reported: 598, of which 0 closed as successfully employed

Pacific Islander: 1,052 (0.9% of the total caseload), of which 100 (9.5% of this group) closed as successfully employed

White: 52,574 (46.2% of the total caseload), of which 5,154 (9.8% of this group) closed as successfully employed


* This figure does not include American Indians served through the American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Program (121 Projects)
Statewide by Disability Category

ALL: 113,890, of which 10,719 (9.4%) closed as successfully employed

Psychiatric Disabilities: 33,193 (29.1% of the total caseload), of which 2,694 (8.1% of this group) closed as successfully employed

Physical Disabilities: 28,172 (24.7% of the total caseload), of which 1,871 (6.6% of this group) closed as successfully employed

Learning Disabilities: 19,922 (17.5% of the total caseload), of which 2,154 (10.8% of this group) closed as successfully employed

Developmental Disabilities: 7,731 (6.8% of the total caseload), of which 1,394 (18.0% of this group) closed as successfully employed

Blind/Visually Impaired: 6,767 (5.9% of the total caseload), of which 1,029 (15.2% of this group) closed as successfully employed

Deaf/Hearing Impaired: 6,641 (5.8% of the total caseload), of which 605 (9.1% of this group) closed as successfully employed

Other: 6,443 (5.7% of the total caseload), of which 540 (8.4% of this group) closed as successfully employed

Cognitive Impairments: 3,360 (3.0% of the total caseload), of which 327 (9.7% of this group) closed as successfully employed

Acquired Traumatic Brain Injury: 1,661 (1.5% of the total caseload) , of which 105 (6.3% of this group) closed as successfully employed
Statewide by work status at time of successful closure

ALL: 10,719

Employment Without Supports 8,169 (76.2%)

Supported Employment 1,783 (16.6%)

Homemaker 703 (6.6%)

Self-Employed (Not Business Enterprise Program) 58 (0.5%)

Business Enterprise Program (BEP) 5 (NA)

Unpaid Family 1 (NA)


Statewide by occupation at time of successful closure

ALL: 10,719

Clerical/Sales 3,021 (28.2%)

Services 2,178 (20.3%)

Professional/Technical/Manager 2,158 (20.1%)

Miscellaneous 1,237 (11.5%)

Homemaker/Family Worker 706 (6.6%)

Processing 482 (4.5%)

Structural Work 364 (3.4%)

Farm/Fishing/Forestry 271 (2.5%)

Machine Trades 195 (1.8%)

Bench Work 107 (1.0%)



DOR highlights in 2010
California Model Employer Initiative (CMEI)
The State of California employs over 22,000 individuals who have a disability. While the DOR works to provide consumer employment opportunities throughout the workforce, it also works to ensure that state government is an employment option, and not just a service provider. The State Personnel Board and Department of Rehabilitation have, since 2005, collaborated on efforts to increase state employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. In February 2010, with support from the California Health Incentives Improvement Project (CHIIP), the California Model Employer Initiative (CMEI) Project was launched. In celebration of the July 26, 2010, 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Governor Schwarzenegger issued Executive Order (EO) S-11-10, re-affirming the Administration’s commitment to ensure fairness and non-discrimination in state employment practices. In so doing, the Governor ordered the following:

  1. "Within 30 days of the date of this Executive Order, each agency, department, board, commission and office under my direct executive authority shall establish and/or review its written reasonable accommodation guidelines to ensure that supervisors and managers have the information and resources to provide reasonable accommodations to employees with a disability in a timely and effective manner.

  2. During this review process, each agency, department, board, commission and office under my direct executive authority shall consult with its Equal Employment Opportunity Officer to ensure that the written reasonable accommodation guidelines are sufficient and up to date.

  3. Within 60 days of this Executive Order, the State Personnel Board, in consultation with the Department of Rehabilitation, will meet with all Equal Employment Opportunity Officers to coordinate training of all supervisors and managers regarding their duties to accommodate an employee with a disability.

  4. The Department of General Services, in consultation with the Department of Rehabilitation, shall develop contracts for reasonable accommodation services and equipment to better meet the needs of employees with a disability.

  5. The Department of General Services shall develop and include additional criteria in its statewide purchases to ensure that the goods and services procured are accessible and available to employees with a disability."


We Include
The DOR is a collaborative partner in California's We Include Initiative, which seeks to expand employment opportunities for individuals with developmental disabilities. During the past year DOR collaborated with the state developmental centers, Department of General Services (DGS) and Department of Developmental Services (DDS) on projects such as the Maintenance and Service Occupational Trainees (MSOT). Twenty consumers, from an applicant pool of 50, were chosen for the MSOT program. Each individual was placed, with necessary supports, in a State building for a nine-month trial janitorial on-the-job training project. At the end of the nine-month trial period, 15 consumers were given the opportunity to take the Service Assistant Custodian exam. All 15 consumers who took the exam passed, and can continue working for the State of California, earning a competitive wage and receiving benefits.
Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Projects
In January 2010, the State's TBI project, operating in seven locations throughout the State, was transferred from Department of Mental Health (DMH) to DOR. The initial funding for the TBI project was authorized in 1988 to establish a post –acute continuum of care for persons with TBI. The purpose of the project, funded through vehicle code violation revenue, is to demonstrate the effectiveness of a coordinated service approach to persons with TBI. The TBI Project’s identified services include Supported Living Services, Community Reintegration Services, Service Coordination, Vocational Supportive Services and Family/Community Education.
At the time of the transition from DMH, DOR was providing Vocational Assessment, Work Adjustment, and Employment Services to DOR consumers at two of the seven locations via interagency agreement. Those two contracts continued after the transition, and in FFY 2010, they served 39 DOR consumers. DOR is currently using ARRA funds to add vocational services for DOR consumers at the other five TBI locations. The goal is to permanently fund this component when the ARRA funding ends.

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