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By signing below, both parent and student acknowledges that they have received a copy of the

Advanced Placement U.S. History Syllabus. Furthermore, both parent and student have read this document and understand the demands of this course. Additionally, both parties promises to ensure that the student complete their assignments, as well as meet reading requirements necessary to successfully pass both the course and the AP Examination. Finally, the student will keep their copy of the syllabus in their notebook for the entire school year.
Students must return this completed form to Mr. Klasner by August 31, 2013 for credit.


______

Student (Please Print) Date


________________________

Student Signature


____________________________________ ________________________

Parent (Please Print) Date


____________________________________

Parent Signature


















Mr. Klasner

Everglades High School

Everglades High School

17100 Southwest 48th Court

Miramar, Florida 33027

754-323-0500 ext. 3201

S Y L L A B U S

Teacher: Mr. Bruce Klasnr Email: bruce.klasner@browardschools.com

Course: AP U.S. History (APUSH) Class Website: www.classjump.com

Room: 330

Dear Parents / Guardians and Students:


It is indeed an honor and a privilege to be presented this opportunity of welcoming each of you to another exciting school year here at Everglades High School. As your child’s teacher, it is my mission to stimulate positive and continuous growth and development. Thank you in advance for your dedication and cooperation towards your child’s overall success in AP U.S. History. This 2013 - 2014 promises to be a very productive school year.

COURSE PHILOSOPHY:
It has been said that a tree without roots cannot grow. The same can be said about our children. Each child must have a full understanding of the past and present in order to bring about a better tomorrow. It is the hope of this instructor that this course will make each student’s journey to self-discovery more attainable.
FROM AP CENTRAL ABOUT APUSH:

AP United States History



Introduction

The Advanced Placement Program (AP) offers a course and exam in AP United States History to qualified students who wish to complete studies in secondary school equivalent to an introductory college course in U.S. history. The AP U.S. History Exam presumes at least one year of college-level preparation, as is described in this AP Central booklet

.

The inclusion of material in the Course Description and exam is not intended as an endorsement by the College Board or ETS of the content, ideas, or values expressed in the material. The material contained herein has been selected and periodically revised by high school and university instructors of history who serve as members of



the AP U.S. History Development Committee. It reflects the content of an introductory college course in U.S. history and is based on survey data from more than 100 colleges and universities. The exam tests skills and knowledge gained from an introductory survey in U.S. history.

The Course Purpose

The AP U.S. History course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials—their relevance to

a given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance—and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. An AP U.S. History course should thus develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format.
Themes in AP U.S. History

The U.S. History Development Committee’s notes about the themes:

• The themes listed in this section are designed to encourage students to think conceptually about the American past and to focus on historical change over time.

• These themes should be used in conjunction with the topic outline on pages 7–11 of the AP Course Outline Handbook.

• The themes are not presented in any order of importance; rather, they are in alphabetical order. These ideas may serve as unifying concepts to help students synthesize material and place the history of the United States into larger analytical contexts.

• These themes may also be used to provide ideas for class projects.

• AP U.S. History courses may be constructed using any number of these themes.

• Teachers and students should also feel free to develop their own course themes as they look at the American past through a variety of lenses and examine U.S. history from multiple perspectives.


American Diversity

The diversity of the American people and the relationships among different groups. The roles of race, class, ethnicity, and gender in the history of the United States.



American Identity

Views of the American national character and ideas about American exceptionalism. Recognizing regional differences within the context of what it means to be an American.



Culture

Diverse individual and collective expressions through literature, art, philosophy, music, theater, and film throughout U.S. history. Popular culture and the dimensions of cultural conflict within American society.



Demographic Changes

Changes in birth, marriage, and death rates; life expectancy and family patterns; population size and density. The economic, social, and political effects of immigration, internal migration, and migration networks.



Economic Transformations

Changes in trade, commerce, and technology across time. The effects of capitalist development, labor and unions, and consumerism.



Environment

Ideas about the consumption and conservation of natural resources. The impact of population growth, industrialization, pollution, and urban and suburban expansion.



Globalization

Engagement with the rest of the world from the fifteenth century to the present: colonialism, mercantilism, global hegemony, development of markets, imperialism, and cultural exchange.



Politics and Citizenship

Colonial and revolutionary legacies, American political traditions, growth of democracy, and the development of the modern state. Defining citizenship; struggles for civil rights.



Reform

Diverse movements focusing on a broad range of issues, including anti-slavery, education, labor, temperance, women’s rights, civil rights, gay rights, war, public health, and government.



Religion

The variety of religious beliefs and practices in America from prehistory to the twenty first century; influence of religion on politics, economics, and society.

. 7

Slavery and Its Legacies in North America

Systems of slave labor and other forms of unfree labor (e.g., indentured servitude, contract labor) in American Indian societies, the Atlantic World, and the American South and West. The economics of slavery and its racial dimensions. Patterns of resistance and the long-term economic, political, and social effects of slavery.



War and Diplomacy

Armed conflict from the precolonial period to the twenty-first century; impact of war on American foreign policy and on politics, economy, and society.



Topic Outline

The U.S. History Development Committee’s notes about the topic outline:

• This topic outline is intended as a general guide for AP teachers in structuring their courses and for students in preparing for the AP U.S. History Exam.

• The outline is not intended to be prescriptive of what AP teachers must teach, nor of what AP students must study.

• The topics listed here provide some broad parameters for the course and may be expanded or modified for instruction.
1. Pre-Columbian Societies

Early inhabitants of the Americas

American Indian empires in Mesoamerica, the Southwest, and the Mississippi Valley

American Indian cultures of North America at the time of European contact


2. Transatlantic Encounters and Colonial Beginnings, 1492–1690

First European contacts with American Indians

Spain’s empire in North America

French colonization of Canada

English settlement of New England, the Mid-Atlantic region, and the South

From servitude to slavery in the Chesapeake region

Religious diversity in the American colonies

Resistance to colonial authority: Bacon’s Rebellion, the Glorious Revolution, and the

Pueblo Revolt
3. Colonial North America, 1690–1754

Population growth and immigration

Transatlantic trade and the growth of seaports

The eighteenth-century back country

Growth of plantation economies and slave societies

The Enlightenment and the Great Awakening

Colonial governments and imperial policy in British North America
1. Civil War

Two societies at war: mobilization, resources, and internal dissent

Military strategies and foreign diplomacy

Emancipation and the role of African Americans in the war

Social, political, and economic effects of war in the North, South, and West
12. Reconstruction

Presidential and Radical Reconstruction

Southern state governments: aspirations, achievements, failures

Role of African Americans in politics, education, and the economy

Compromise of 1877

Impact of Reconstruction



13. The Origins of the New South

Reconfiguration of southern agriculture: sharecropping and crop-lien system

Expansion of manufacturing and industrialization

The politics of segregation: Jim Crow and disfranchisement


14. Development of the West in the Late Nineteenth Century

Expansion and development of western railroads

Competitors for the West: miners, ranchers, homesteaders, and American Indians

Government policy toward American Indians

Gender, race, and ethnicity in the far West

Environmental impacts of western settlement


15. Industrial America in the Late Nineteenth Century

Corporate consolidation of industry

Effects of technological development on the worker and workplace

Labor and unions

National politics and influence of corporate power

Migration and immigration: the changing face of the nation

Proponents and opponents of the new order, e.g., Social Darwinism and Social Gospel
16. Urban Society in the Late Nineteenth Century

Urbanization and the lure of the city

City problems and machine politics

Intellectual and cultural movements and popular entertainment


17. Populism and Progressivism

Agrarian discontent and political issues of the late nineteenth century

Origins of Progressive reform: municipal, state, and national

Roosevelt, Taft, and Wilson as Progressive presidents

Women’s roles: family, workplace, education, politics, and reform

Black America: urban migration and civil rights initiatives



18. The Emergence of America as a World Power

American imperialism: political and economic expansion

War in Europe and American neutrality

The First World War at home and abroad

Treaty of Versailles

Society and economy in the postwar years


19. The New Era: 1920s

The business of America and the consumer economy

Republican politics: Harding, Coolidge, and Hoover

The culture of Modernism: science, the arts, and entertainment

Responses to Modernism: religious fundamentalism, nativism, and Prohibition

The ongoing struggle for equality: African Americans and women


20. The Great Depression and the New Deal

Causes of the Great Depression

The Hoover administration’s response

Franklin Delano Roosevelt and the New Deal

Labor and union recognition

The New Deal coalition and its critics from the Right and the Left

Surviving hard times: American society during the Great Depression
21. The Second World War

The rise of fascism and militarism in Japan, Italy, and Germany

Prelude to war: policy of neutrality

The attack on Pearl Harbor and United States declaration of war

Fighting a multifront war

Diplomacy, war aims, and wartime conferences

The United States as a global power in the Atomic Age
22. The Home Front During the War

Wartime mobilization of the economy

Urban migration and demographic changes

Women, work, and family during the war

Civil liberties and civil rights during wartime

War and regional development

Expansion of government power
23. The United States and the Early Cold War

Origins of the Cold War

Truman and containment

The Cold War in Asia: China, Korea, Vietnam, and Japan

Diplomatic strategies and policies of the Eisenhower and Kennedy administrations

The Red Scare and McCarthyism

Impact of the Cold War on American society
24. The 1950s

Emergence of the modern civil rights movement

The affluent society and “the other America”

Consensus and conformity: suburbia and middle-class America

Social critics, nonconformists, and cultural rebels

Impact of changes in science, technology, and medicine


25. The Turbulent 1960s

From the New Frontier to the Great Society

Expanding movements for civil rights

Cold War confrontations: Asia, Latin America, and Europe

Beginning of Détente

The antiwar movement and the counterculture


26. Politics and Economics at the End of the Twentieth Century

The election of 1968 and the “Silent Majority”

Nixon’s challenges: Vietnam, China, and Watergate

Changes in the American economy: the energy crisis, deindustrialization, and the

service economy

The New Right and the Reagan revolution

End of the Cold War
27. Society and Culture at the End of the Twentieth Century

Demographic changes: surge of immigration after 1965, Sunbelt migration, and the

graying of America

Revolutions in biotechnology, mass communication, and computers

Politics in a multicultural society
28. The United States in the Post–Cold War World

Globalization and the American economy

Unilateralism vs. multilateralism in foreign policy

Domestic and foreign terrorism

Environmental issues in a global context

In addition to exposing students to the historical content listed above, an AP course should also train students to analyze and interpret primary sources, including documentary material, maps, statistical tables, and pictorial and graphic evidence of historical events. Students need to have an awareness of multiple interpretations of historical issues in secondary sources. Students should have a sense of multiple causation and change over time, and should be able to compare developments or trends from one period to another.


The course can also make profitable use of the Internet, television and audiovisual aids to instruction, and

historical exhibits in local museums, historical societies, and libraries. Anthologies and paperback editions of important works of literature should be readily available for teachers dealing with cultural and intellectual history, as should collections of slides illustrating changing technology, the history of art, and architecture.

AP classes require extra time on the part of the instructor for preparation, personal consultation with students, and the reading of a much larger number of written assignments than would be given to students in regular classes. Accordingly, some schools reduce the assigned teaching hours for any teacher offering such a class or

classes.


T he Exam

The exam is 3 hours and 5 minutes in length and consists of two sections: a 55-minute multiple-choice section and a 130-minute free-response section. The free-response section begins with a mandatory 15-minute reading period. Students are advised to spend most of the 15 minutes analyzing the documents and planning their answer to the document-based essay question (DBQ) in Part A. Suggested writing time for the DBQ is 45 minutes. Parts B and C each include two standard essay questions that, with the DBQ, cover the period from the first European explorations of the Americas to the present.


Students are required to answer one essay question in each part in a total of 70 minutes. For each of the essay questions students choose to answer in Parts B and C, it is suggested they spend 5 minutes planning and 30 minutes writing. Both the multiple-choice and the free-response sections cover the period from the first European explorations of the Americas to the present, although a majority of questions are on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Sincerely,


Mr. Bruce Klasner


COURSE DESCRIPTION:




AP United States History is designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to think critically about the materials and content in United States history. Students will learn to assess historical materials, their relevance, and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. After successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

1. Formulate generalizations about the past in order to develop a theory or theories on

the development of contemporary and future society.

2. Derive conclusions from American historical development and growth based on

physical and cultural geographic principles.

3. Apply the processes of critical and creative thinking to evaluate the changes made

by significant people, ideas and events on the development of values, traditions,

and social, economic and political institutions in the United States.

4. Analyze current and historic events as perceived by diverse cultural and ethnic

groups and form generalizations about their contributions in developing the variety

of American culture.

5. Evaluate the processes used to create and interpret history.

6. Formulate hypotheses on relationships among science, technology and society, and

their impact on historical change in the United States.

7. Apply research, study, critical-thinking and decision-making skills and demonstrate

the use of new and emerging technology in problem solving.


Textbook:

America’s History, Seventh Edition, Henrietta, Edwards and Self 2012

The American Pageant, 12th Edition , Kennedy, Cohen and Bailey, 2002


Course Materials:

  1. Notebook with loose leaf paper

  2. Writing pen with blue or black ink

  3. Writing pen with red ink (for editing notes, essays, etc)

  4. Number 2 pencil (2)

  5. Highlighters (any color will do)

  6. Pocket Dictionary

  7. USB drive (for saving projects, paper, etc)

  8. Internet access (all essays must be typed and submitted to turnitin.com

  9. 12 Clear Sheet Protectors.

  10. MANY Index cards to be used throughout the year for review, study, and knowledge retension.


Tests and Essays:

Students will take unit tests every two weeks, upon the completion of each unit. Tests will generally consist of a multiple-choice section and an essay section of equal weight. Each test is likely to cover a significantly greater volume of material than many students have previously experienced. These tests emphasize factual information, multiple causation/multiple outcomes, as well as the concept of change over time. Thus, students are required to interpret and evaluate the events of history and support their conclusions with specific factual information. Each assignment will significantly impact the quarter grades. Therefore, students must be responsible and prepare for each assignment and test.


Additionally, students will receive two or three supplementary in-class or at home essays or document based questions (DBQs) will be required each quarter. The instructor will implement pop quizzes if it becomes apparent that students are in need of encouragement to maintain their

reading assignments schedule. Students may have the option of take home tests, in which they may use their textbooks to complete them. However, they are to work independently and sharing information with their class mates is strictly prohibited.


National Advanced Placement Examination:

The Advanced Placement Program of the College Board affords students an opportunity to receive college credit for AP classes by successfully passing the national examination offered the week of May 13-17, 2013. The AP United States Examination usually consists of eighty multiple-choice questions, one document-based question, and two free response questions. The multiple-choice section and the essay section (DBQ and free response) each make up fifty percent of the grade. Students must take the Advanced Placement U.S. History Examination will NOT receive AP credit for the course.


Honor Code:

Students will abide by the honor code statement I have neither given nor received help on this assignment for all assignments unless specifically exempted by the instructor. Violations of the honor code pledge will result in a zero for the assignment. Examples of violations of this policy include (but not limited to) giving or receiving help on any in-class or take home test (this includes use of cell phone web searches), essay, or quiz, plagiarism of material on take-home essays, and discussion of any quiz, test, or essay questions with students who have not yet completed that assignment.


Assignment Policy:

All assignments will be given according to documented county policy. Refusal to do assignments when assigned will result in students receiving a grade of zero. This policy is non-negotiable.




  1. All essays and reports must be typed and double-spaced.

  2. Always use an ink pen.


Homework:

  1. For each day of an excused absence, the student will have two days to make up missed work upon return. Students with an un-excused absence will not receive make up assignments.

  2. If the homework was assigned during the student’s absence, the student will be responsible for making up the work upon his/her return to school in accordance with the “two day” aforementioned rule. (Applies to those with excused absences)

  3. Students are responsible for turning in assignments on time while on field trips and/or other school sponsored activities (unless special arrangements have been made in advance with the teacher).

  4. Be aware of the fact that the instructor is under no obligation to accept work after the due date.


Grading Policy:

Grades will be compiled as a combination of the following:



  1. Class work: DBQs Essays, Discussions, Book Assignments and others as assigned.

  2. Homework

  3. Quizzes

  4. Mid-term and Final Examination

Grading Scale:

This instructor will adhere to the standard grading scale of the School Board of Broward County. The student’s number of points will be divided by the total number of assignments to determine a percentage which is then converted to a letter grade based upon the following scale:


Course Points and Class Participation:

Class work 30%

Examinations 60%

Project 10%


Rules and Regulations:

Rules: The guidelines established by the Broward County Code of Conduct will be

strictly enforced in the classroom.


  1. Students are to be in their assigned seats and ready to work when the tardy bell rings.

  2. Students are not allowed to operate their cellular phones and other electronic devices during class.

  3. Hats, radios, stuffed toys, etc. are not permitted on campus and will be confiscated by any staff member.

  4. Disruptive, disrespectful and insubordinate behavior directed at me or any other student will not be tolerated.

  5. Students must comply with the dress code.

  6. No personal grooming during class.

  7. Each student is responsible for cleaning his/her desk.

  8. Paper is to be thrown away at the conclusion of class.

  9. Any students placed in Internal Suspension are responsible for obtaining, completing, and turning in missed assignments in accordance with county policy.

  10. Students are encourage to adhere to all assignment due dates.

  11. Please be advised that this teacher reserves the right to exercise “Academic Discretion”.


Consequences:

  1. Verbal Teacher / Student Conference

  2. Telephone Call to Residence

  3. Referral to Administrator or Guidance Counselor


Automatic Office Referrals:

  1. Fighting

  2. Deliberate Profanity

  3. Fourth un-excused tardy to class

  4. Insubordination

  5. Disrespect to myself or another student

  6. Repeated violation of classroom rules

If you have any questions or would like to schedule a conference with me, please feel free to call and/or email me.





THEMES IN AP U.S. HISTORY




American Diversity

The diversity of the American people and the relationships among different groups. The roles of race, class ethnicity, and gender in the history of the United States.

American Identity

The views of the American national character and ideas about American exceptionalism. Recognizing regional differences within the context of what it means to be an American.


Culture

Diverse individual and collective expressions through literature, art, philosophy, music, theater, and film throughout U.S. History. Popular culture and the dimensions of cultural conflict within the American society.

Demographic

Changes

Changes in birth, marriage and death rates; life expectancy and family patterns; population size and density. The economic, social and political effects of immigration internal migration, as well as the migration networks.


Economic Transformations

Changes in trade, commerce and technology across time. The effects of capitalist development, labor and unions, and consumerism.

Environment

Ideas about the consumption and conservation of natural resources. The impact of population growth, industrialization, pollution, as well as urban and suburban expansion.

Globalization

Engagement with the rest of the world from the 15th century to the present: colonialism, mercantilism, global hegemony, development of markets, imperialism and cultural exchange.

Politics and Citizenship

Colonial and revolutionary legacies, American political traditions, growth of democracy, and the development of the modern state. Defining citizenship; struggles for civil rights.

Reform

Diverse movements focusing on a broad range of issues, including: anti-slavery, education, labor, temperance, women’s rights, civil rights, gay rights, public health and government.

Religion

The variety of religious beliefs and practices in America from prehistory to the 21st century; influence of religion on politics, economics and society.


Slavery and its Legacies in North America

The systems of slave labor and other forms of ‘unfree’ labor (e.g., indentured servitude, contract labor) in Native American societies, the Atlantic World, as well as the American South and West. The economics of slavery and its racial dimensions. Patterns of resistance and the long-term economic, political and social effects of slavery.

War and Diplomacy

Armed conflict from the pre-colonial period to the 21st century; impact of war on American foreign policy, politics, economy, and society.

QUARTERLY BREAKDOWN





FIRST QUARTER


Topic

Reference

Activities




Colonial History (2 weeks: 8/19-8/30/13)

  • Motives and methods of colonization: Spain, France, Britain

  • Push-pull factors bringing colonists to the New World

  • Comparison and contrast of Southern, Middle and New England political, economic, social, and religious patterns

  • Cultural differences between Americans and Europeans

  • Mercantilism — costs and benefits for Britain and colonies

  • British policy changes, post-1763




• Chapter 1-4, The American Pageant

• Internet



Read Chapters, Lectures, Discussion Questions, Analyze Primary Resources, Chart Comparison of 13 colonies, Essay on the influence of geography on patterns of settlement, Cause-Effect Chart on Mercantilism, Assessments.





Independence (1-2 weeks: 9/2/13-9/13/13

  • Emerging colonial cooperation and decision for independence

  • Military victory and terms of the Treaty of Paris




• Chapter 5-7, The American Pageant

• Internet



Read Chapters, Lectures, Discussion Questions,

Assessments, Project

Colonial Newspaper




Post-Independence and the Critical Period (2 weeks: 9/16/13-9/27/13

  • Government under the Articles of Confederation — Successes and failures

  • Constitutional Convention

  • Hamilton v. Jefferson

  • British-French conflict and its impact on American politics




• Chapter 8-10, The American Pageant

• Internet



Read Chapters, Lectures, Discussion Questions, Primary Resources, Compare and Contrast chart on Political Parties, Analyze Primary Source Resources, Bios, Case Studies, Assessments





Jefferson’s Administration/Growth of Nationalism (2 weeks: 9/30/13-10/11/13

  • Jefferson’s “Revolution of 1800”

  • War of 1812: Causes, Conduct, Consequences

  • Marshall Court rulings and precedents

  • Era of Good Feelings

  • Monroe Doctrine

• Chapter 11-12, The American Pageant

• Internet




Read Chapters, Discussion Questions, Lectures, Case Studies, Bios, DBQ on Era of Good Feelings, Analyze Primary Resources, Assessments



SECOND QUARTER




Topic

Reference

Activities




The Age of Jackson and Territorial Expansion (2 weeks: 10/14-10/25/13

  • Election of 1824 and the founding of Jackson’s Democratic Party

  • Jackson’s Administration

  • Manifest Destiny and the War with Mexico

  • Immigration; social, political, and economic developments; and reform movements, 1820-1850


Slavery and Sectionalism

(2 weeks; 10/28-11/8/13

Agrarian South vs. Industrial North



  • Western expansion

  • Slavery as a social and economic institution

  • The politics of slavery

  • Decade of conflict, 1850-1860




• Chapter 13-15, The American Pageant

• Internet


• Chapter 16-19, The American Pageant

• Internet


Read Chapters, Discussion Questions, Lectures, Chart on Political Parties, , Analyze Primary Resources, Age of Jackson Project, Assessments

Read Chapters, Discussion Questions, Lectures, Bios, Case Studies, DBQ on Slavery, Analyze Primary Resources, Movie: Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Assessments







Civil War and Reconstruction

(3 weeks: 11/11-11/29/2103)

  • Military strategies, strengths and weaknesses, events and outcomes

  • The home front, North and South

  • Presidential v. Congressional Reconstruction plans and actions

  • Amendments 13tth,14th, & 15th

  • Economic development: The New South (sharecropping)

  • Politics in the New South (Jim Crow)

  • Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois leadership styles and programs

  • Native Americans-Reservation policy-Dawes Act




• Chapter 20-22, The American Pageant

• Internet



Read Chapters, DBQ on Civil War, Compare and Contrast chart on Reconstruction, Essay on Reconstruction, Discussion Questions, Lectures, Internet Activity Cause/Effect, Movie: Glory, Assessments



Populists and Progressives

(2 weeks: 12/2-2/13/2013

  • Agrarian Revolt

  • Immigration and urbanization in the late 19th century

  • Social and cultural developments of the late 19th century

  • Urban middle-class reformers lead a call for change

  • Teddy Roosevelt, Taft, and Wilson administrations respond to Progressive movement



• Chapter 26-29 The American Pageant

• Internet



Read Chapter, Discussion Questions, Analyze Primary Sources Lectures, Project on reformers, DBQ on Progressivism, Assessments




THIRD QUARTER




Topic

Reference

Activities
















Imperialism and World War I

(2 weeks: 1`/6-1/17/2014)

  • Reasons for new interest in world affairs

  • Spanish-American War

  • Open Door Policy

  • Teddy Roosevelt’s “Big Stick” Diplomacy

  • Taft’s Dollar Diplomacy

  • Wilson’s “Moral” or “Missionary” Diplomacy

  • Various interpretations of U.S. motives in World War I

  • World War I at home

  • Treaty negotiations and Senate rejection of Versailles Treaty




• Chapter 30-31 The American Pageant

• Internet



Read Chapter, Discussion Questions, Analyze Primary Sources Lectures, Essay on Imperialism, DBQ on World War I, Assessments





1920s-1930s

(2 weeks: 1/20-1/31/2014)

  • Post-war recession & agricultural problems

  • Intolerance/ KKK

  • Immigration restriction

  • Prohibition and Organized Crime

  • Jazz Age culture, Youth Rebellion, Literature of Disillusionment

  • Business growth and consolidation, credit, advertising

  • Harding, Coolidge, Hoover administrations

  • Hoover v. Roosevelt’s approaches to the Depression

  • New Deal Legislation — Effectiveness and Criticisms

  • Supreme Court Reactions and Court Packing Plan

  • Dust Bowl -Demographic Shifts

  • Extremist alternatives: Coughlin, Long, Townsend

  • The new Democratic Coalition

  • Impact of the Great Depression

• Chapter 33-34, The American Pageant

• Internet




Read Chapter, Discussion Questions, Analyze Primary Sources Lectures, Power Point 20’s Project, Compare and Contrast chart on Hoover and FDR, Assessments






World War II and Origins of the Cold War (2 weeks: 2/3/-2/14/2014)

  • U.S. response to aggression

  • Pearl Harbor and U.S. response

  • Military Strategy

  • Home Front

  • Wartime Diplomacy and Cooperation

  • Splintering of Wartime Alliance and Adoption of Containment

  • Berlin and German Division

  • Truman Doctrine/Marshall Plan

  • NATO/Warsaw Pact

  • Korean War/Domino Theory

  • McCarthyism


• Chapter 35-37, The American Pageant

• Internet

Read Chapter, Discussion Questions, Analyze Primary Sources Lectures, DBQ on World War II, Map project, Assessments






FOURTH QUARTER


Topic

Reference

Activities

Sunshine State Standards (SSS)

Post-War Domestic Issues

(2 weeks: 2/17-2/28/2014

  • Truman’s to Reagan’s Administration

  • Civil Rights Movement: Popular and Government Response

  • Feminine Mystique-Betty Friedan

  • Rachel Carson and Ralph Nader

  • Watergate

  • Court Case: Roe v. Wade

  • Reaganomics




• Chapter 38-41, The American Pageant

• Internet



Read Chapter, Discussion Questions, Analyze Primary Sources Lectures, DBQ on Civil Rights, Assessments


SS.A.5.4.5, SS.C.2.4.6, SS.D.1.4.1, SS.B.1.4.4,

SS.C.2.4.6, SS.C.1.4.4



Foreign Policy – Eisenhower-Reagan

(2 weeks: 3/3/-3/14/2014

  • Eisenhower:

Liberation, Asia Policies, Peaceful Co-existence — Khrushchev’s visit, U-2 Incident

  • Kennedy:

Peace Corps, Alliance for Progress, Southeast Asia military and economic aid, Bay of Pigs & Cuban Missile Crisis

  • Johnson: Vietnam War

  • Nixon/Ford:

Vietnamization, Nixon Doctrine, China Card, and Détente

  • Carter:

Human Rights Policies, Camp David Accords, Panama Canal Treaties, SALT II, Afghanistan, and Olympic Boycott, Iran Revolution and Hostage Crisis

  • Reagan:

“The Evil Empire”, Strategic Defense Initiative, and End of the Cold War


• Chapter 38-42, The American Pageant

• Internet



Read Chapter, Discussion Questions, Primary Sources Lectures, DBQ on Vietnam War, Assessments



SS.A.5.4.6, SS.C.2.4.6,

SS.C.1.4.4, SS.D.2.4.4, SS.B.2.4.2, SS.A.5.4.6

SS.C.1.4.4, SS.D.1.4.1, SS.B.1.4.4, SS.B.2.4.2


Presidencies of Bush, Clinton and G.W. Bush (2 weeks: 3/17-4/4/2014

  • Affirmative Action

  • America 2000 –Education

  • War on Drugs

  • Urban Violence –Gangs

  • Persian Gulf War

  • NAFTA

  • Big tobacco and Gun control

  • Scandal and Impeachment

  • Election of 2000

  • New Immigration

  • September 11, 2001

  • War in Iraq



Review for AP Exam

(3 weeks- 4/21/2014-5/12/2014


• Chapter 41-42, The American Pageant

• Internet



Read Chapter, Discussion Questions, Primary Sources, Assessments

SS.A.5.4.6, SS.C.2.4.3, SS.C.2.4.6, SS.C.2.4.7, SS.C.1.4.4, SS.D.2.4.4




Review Book

  • U.S. History Preparing for the AP Exam, Newman & Schmalbach, Amsco

  • 5 Steps to a 5 (AP review book)

Websites

http://college.hmco.com/history/us/bailey/american_pageant/11e/students/index.html,

www.coralgladeshigh.com, www.collegeboard.com, www.course-notes.org, www.potus.com, www.besthistorysites.net/USHistory.shtml, www.historychannel.com,



www.ushistory.org/

Final Exam: First Week in June





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