Brave New World, Huxley's bad Utopia, with



Download 22.69 Kb.
Date conversion29.04.2016
Size22.69 Kb.
Brave New World

UTOPIAS


    1. Compare Brave New World, Huxley's bad Utopia, with Island, his good one.

    2. How does the society prophesied by Brave New World compare with today's reality?

    3. Why do the creators of Utopias introduce savages into their new worlds? (Hint: looking at ideal states through the eyes of a primitive stranger provides deeper and more colorful visions.)

COMMUNITY, IDENTITY, STABILITY

4-5. How is each one achieved in the brave new world? (Hint: see the section of this guide on themes.)

SCIENCE 


    1. What scientific developments did Brave New World foresee? How much of its scientific prophecy has come true?

    2. Why did Huxley emphasize chemical and psychological conditioning rather than make super weapons or nuclear energy elements of his new world? (Hint: he was interested in science that could affect man without killing him, and his Utopia took other advances for granted.)

    3. How does the controlled breeding of Brave New World compare to the recent changes in genetic engineering in the real world?

CONDITIONING



    1. Why does the Utopia use chemical and physical conditioning on embryos in bottles? (Look at the specific conditioning achieved.)

    2. Why does the Utopia use hypnopaedia to condition babies? (Distinguish between teaching facts and teaching moral attitudes while you sleep.)

    3. In what ways are we "conditioned" today? By what? Whom? From what motivations? For what purposes?

SEXUAL PLEASURE



    1. Why does the Utopia encourage people to be promiscuous?

    2. Would I like to live in a world where everyone belongs to everyone else? (Analyze why and why not.)

    3. Would Malthusian drill be something we could borrow from Brave New World to deal with teenage pregnancy? (Again, why and why not?)

SOMA


    1. Why is this drug a supreme necessity in the brave new world? (Hint: keep people happy by enabling them to escape.) Why is this a perversion of Huxley's hopes for a perfect drug? (Hint: it doesn't help you achieve knowledge of God; see section on Themes in this guide.)

    2. How does the Utopia's use of soma compare with real-world use of alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, and cocaine?

    3. In what ways can and are drugs used in a positive way today? In a negative way? What dangers does Huxley want us to avoid?

OTHER PLEASURES



    1. How would I feel about the Feelies?

    2. How would I feel about Brave New World sports? (Include your thoughts about Huxley's failure to give details and on his using the names as a joke.)

RELIGION


    1. In what way is "Ford" in Brave New World like "Christ" in our world? In what ways are the two different?

    2. Why do you think Huxley chose to mythologize Ford (and briefly Freud) in Brave New World?

FAMILY


    1. Why does the Utopia make family an obscene joke or a crime? (Hint: Huxley says it's because families produce neuroses. Could it also be that the family is a focus of loyalty that might compete with the state?)

    2. Compare the idea of family in Brave New World with a Utopia you create that redesigns a family to make people happy. (What changes would you make in your own family?)

DEATH


    1. Death as a natural process- how the Utopia sees it, and how I see it.

    2. Why the brave new world tries to eliminate the sense of loss and grief.

THE COSTS OF UTOPIA



    1. What are the costs of achieving the good aspects of the brave new world? (Describe the benefits of the world and their costs- including costs like the loss of family and the loss of art. Estimate whether the costs are high or low, and compare your estimate to Huxley's.)

SATIRE

    1. How might Huxley be satirizing American culture through this novel?

GLOSSARY

1. ANTHRAX 


An infectious, often fatal disease of sheep and cattle that can also kill humans. The Utopian state was established after a war in which anthrax bombs were used as a weapon of germ warfare.

  1. BOKANOVSKIFY; BOKANOVSKY'S PROCESS
    Method to make a human egg bud by arresting its growth, producing up to 96 identical people.

  2. CASTE 
    One of the five groups into which all citizens of the brave new world are divided by heredity and conditioning, each with its own rank and intelligence range. They are Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, and Epsilon, from the Greek letters that English schools use as grades.

  3. COMMUNITY SING
    An observance of the Fordian religion for the lower castes. The Arch Community Songster is the equivalent of an Archbishop.

  4. CONDITION 
    To put into a desired state by chemical, physical, or psychological action.

  5. DECANTING
    Process by which embryos are removed from the bottles in which they grow; equivalent of birth.

  6. ECTOGENESIS 
    Reproduction outside the human body, for example in bottles.

  7. EMOTIONAL ENGINEERING 
    Designing propaganda for use on citizens. The Utopia's closest equivalent to writing poetry.

  8. FITCHEW
    A Shakespearean word that John uses to curse Lenina. Literally a polecat, but in Shakespeare's day it also meant a prostitute.

  9. FLIVVER
    An old, small, or cheap automobile. Henry Ford's original Model T was often called a flivver, so the word takes on religious meaning in the Utopia.

  10. FREEMARTIN
    A sterile person; the Utopia makes 70 percent of its females freemartins by dosing the embryos with male sex hormones. They still have female sex organs, but they also have beards that need shaving.

  11. GAMETES 
    General term for reproductive cells of either sex.

  12. HYPNOPAEDIA
    Teaching people while they sleep. In the book, suitable only for moral suggestion, not facts or analysis.

  13. OVA 
    Female reproductive cells.

  14. PODSNAP'S TECHNIQUE Method to speed the ripening of human eggs, making it possible to multiply the number a single ovary can produce.

  15. PREDESTINATION 
    The process of determining which embryos will grow up to do particular jobs in particular places. The word has religious overtones; it once meant God's decision as to who would be saved and who would be damned.

  16. PREGNANCY SUBSTITUTE
    A medical technique that floods a woman's body with all the hormonal and other physical changes it would undergo during pregnancy, which she will never experience.

  17. SAVAGE
    A person who is born and raised outside the Utopia and does not know how to behave according to its rules. Savages live on Reservations surrounded by electrified fences. The Savages who appear in the book resemble Indians of the Southwest United States.

  18. SCENT ORGAN
    An instrument that plays smells the way a piano or a pipe organ plays music.

  19. SOLIDARITY SERVICE
    A Fordian religious observance for the upper castes, usually 12 people who eventually unite in a sexual orgy.

  20. SOMA 
    A drug that both tranquilizes and intoxicates without hangovers or side effects. It provides citizens of the Utopia with escape from self and surroundings. The word comes from the Sanskrit language of ancient India. It means both an intoxicating drink used in the old Vedic religious rituals there and the plant from whose juice the drink was made- a plant whose true identity we don't know.

  21. SPERMATOZOA
    Male reproductive cells.

  22. SURROGATE 
    Something selected as a substitute. Embryos grow in blood surrogate instead of real blood because they grow outside a mother's body. Morocco-surrogate is imitation leather. Violent Passion Surrogate floods the body with the same hormones that fear and rage would.

  23. VIVIPAROUS 
    Bearing live young rather than eggs, as mammals, including humans, do.

  24. ZIPPICAMIKNICKS 
    Women's underwear, one-piece but sexy.

Themes

    1. INDIVIDUAL FREEDOM VERSUS COMMUNITY IDENTITY

    2. SCIENCE AS A MEANS OF CONTROL

    3. THE THREAT OF GENETIC ENGINEERING

    4.  THE MISUSE OF PSYCHOLOGICAL CONDITIONING

    5. THE CHEAPENING OF SEXUAL PLEASURE

    6. THE PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS THROUGH DRUGS

    7. THE THREAT OF MINDLESS CONSUMPTION AND MINDLESS DIVERSIONS

    8. THE DESTRUCTION OF THE FAMILY

    9. THE DENIAL OF DEATH

    10. THE OPPRESSION OF INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES

    11. WHAT DOES SUCH A SYSTEM COST?

    12. THE PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS THROUGH DRUGS


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page