Before and After Intervention Irony Before



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Before and After Intervention

Irony Before:


Irony is a technique used by authors and storytellers in which what is expected does not occur, often having the opposite happen. This is often referred to as the “ironic twist” in a plot. Irony can be presented in literature through events in the plot, actions or behaviors by characters, or even through symbols, such as having a symbol represent the contrary of what it typically represents in literature, i.e., the color black representing a rebirth or pure lifestyle. Irony is often added into a work in order to increase readers’ interest, though it must be acknowledged that every reader will not catch the irony—without the background knowledge of what is typical, such as the commonly understood symbolism of an object, the contrary will not seem nearly as surprising or out of place.  Not only may irony be added to increase the readers' interest, but also as the climax in a storyline.  When the opposite happens, as described above, the storyline takes a turn and is transformed into something new in which the reader has to revaluate what he/she thinks is going to happen next. 

Irony takes a reader's expectations and throws them to the wind. Its intent is to add contrasting elements to the story line, interest for its reader to delve into it, and the occasional humorous insert. Alongside its potential comical insert, irony can be used to develop all sorts of emotional ties and representations, furthering a reader's interest. 

Uses of irony occur when something can be read more than one way and the outcome is usually unexpected. Irony can be found in Paulo Coelho’s, The Alchemist. The type of irony used in this book is situational, which means that the outcome of the book is different from what was originally thought to happen. The protagonist, Santiago, is a shepherd who sets out on a quest sparked by a dream he has in an abandoned church in Spain. A gypsy’s interpretation of the dream is to find treasure at the pyramids in Egypt. Throughout the course of the book, Santiago meets people and travels places that get him closer and closer to reaching this treasure. When he finally arrives to where the treasure should be, someone has beat him to the task. The men who took the treasure explain that dreams mean nothing. One of the men’s personal dreams that treasure resides in an abandoned church in Spain proved to be worthless for him. But for Santiago, it means everything because that is where his treasure resides. The irony was that Santiago goes on this long quest for treasure, when in the end it has always been right where he started.

Another good example for irony was in a TV show I had once seen. It was an episode of the Twilight Series and in it a man who loved to read would always complain because he never had the time to do so. Well something happens, I’m afraid I can’t recall what, but suddenly he has all the time in the world to do whatever he wants and starts collecting all the books he wanted to read. After he collects them all to one location, he excitedly reaches for the first one and his glasses fall off his face. As soon as they hit the ground, the lens brake and there is no one around to fix them for he, so he is unable to see the words of the book.



Irony is when the opposite of what you expected happens. An example of this is when a person names a huge dog tiny or when you make fun of a person for tripping over something and you turn around and trip. Everybody at some point during the day comes in contact with something ironic. 

Irony After:


Irony is a technique used by authors and storytellers in which what is expected does not occur, often having the opposite happen instead. This is often referred to as the “ironic twist” in a plot. Irony can be presented in literature through events in the plot, actions or behaviors by characters, or even through symbols, such as having a symbol represent the contrary of what it typically represents in literature, i.e., the color black representing rebirth or a pure lifestyle. Irony is often added into a work in order to increase readers’ interest, though it must be acknowledged that every reader will not catch the irony—without the background knowledge of what is typical, such as the commonly understood symbolism of an object, the contrary will not seem nearly as surprising or out of place.  Not only may irony be added to increase the readers' interest, but also as the climax in a storyline.  When the opposite happens, as described above, the storyline takes a turn and is transformed into something new in which the reader has to revaluate what he/she thinks is going to happen next. Essentially taking a reader's expectations and throwing them to the wind. Irony can also occur at the very end of a work, serving more as a surprise ending rather than a climax or redirection in plot. One such example is Jodi Picoult's My Sister's Keeper. The entire book tells the story of two sisters, one with cancer and one who was genetically fertilized in order to be a perfect match as a blood/organ donor in order to keep the first daughter alive as long as possible. The dying girl convinces her younger sister that this is not the life either one of them necessarily wants or deserves to live so the younger sister files for medical emancipation in order to cut off her long time responsibility of keeping her sister alive through medical donations. The novel ends by her winning her medical emancipation, implying to readers that the older sister's life will likely end soon, yet on the ride home from the courthouse that very day, the younger one is tragically killed in a car accident and the older one soon becomes healthy. This example demonstrates not only how irony can occur at the conclusion of stories, but also why background knowledge is so critical. Without having known the entire story, having a young girl die in a car accident, though tragic, would not be seen as ironic. The intent of is to add contrasting elements to the story line, interest for its reader to delve into it, and the occasional humorous insert. Irony that is viewed as comical is probably one of the most typical forms of irony seen in everyday, common behaviors. Two examples of comical irony would be naming a huge dog Tiny or someone making fun of a person for tripping and then turning around and tripping just seconds later. Everybody at some point during the day comes in contact with something ironic. Alongside its potential comical insert, irony can be used to develop all sorts of emotional ties and representations, furthering a reader's interest. A great example of this can be found in Jonathan Swift's "A Modest Proposal." This is a satire which uses irony to grasp his reader's attention and hopefully make them aware of what is happening in an effort that they might act and do something about it. What makes this story so ironic derives from the fact the whole story is suggesting that poor Irish folk sell their children for money so they will not starve and the overpopulation, economic and unemployment problems of the time would take care of themselves. Continually, uses of irony occur when something can be read more than one way and the outcome is usually unexpected. Irony can be found in Paulo Coelho’s, The Alchemist. The type of irony used in this book is situational, which means that the outcome of the book is different from what was originally thought to happen. The protagonist, Santiago, is a shepherd who sets out on a quest sparked by a dream he has in an abandoned church in Spain. A gypsy’s interpretation of the dream is to find treasure at the pyramids in Egypt. Throughout the course of the book, Santiago meets people and travels places that get him closer and closer to reaching this treasure. When he finally arrives to where the treasure should be, someone has beat him to the task. The men who took the treasure explain that dreams mean nothing. One of the men’s personal dreams that treasure resides in an abandoned church in Spain proved to be worthless for him. But for Santiago, it means everything because that is where his treasure resides. The irony was that Santiago goes on this long quest for treasure, when in the end it has always been right where he started. Another good example for irony was in a TV show I had once seen. It was an episode of the Twilight Series and in it a man who loved to read would always complain because he never had the time to do so. Well something happens, I’m afraid I can’t recall what, but suddenly he has all the time in the world to do whatever he wants and starts collecting all the books he wanted to read. After he collects them all to one location, he excitedly reaches for the first one and his glasses fall off his face. As soon as they hit the ground, the lens brake and there is no one around to fix them for he, so he is unable to see the words of the book.


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