Bdote memory map



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Minnesota Department of Education

May 15, 2004, 9:45 p.m.





BDOTE MEMORY MAP
and

THE MINNESOTA STATE STANDARDS

The purpose of including these is two-fold.  Standards have been highlighted that relate either directly to Dakota/Native issues as they must be addressed by the standards OR general standards that may be addressed using Bdote Memory Map resources.  

 

You should also look at the standards with an eye for what is missing.  In history, other than a vague reference to the American Indian Movement in the 1970s, Dakota and Ojibwe cultures are only taught as ancient history, as existing only before white people came here.  The Bdote Memory Map exists as a way to fill in those gaps.



Minnesota Academic Standards in History and Social Studies

HISTORY AND SOCIAL STUDIES

If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be . . .I know of no safe depository of the ultimate powers of the society but the people themselves. And if we think them not enlightened enough to exercise their control with wholesome discretion, the remedy is not to take it from them, but to inform their discretion by education. - Thomas Jefferson
Minnesota Academic Standards in History and Social Studies
HISTORY
What is History?

The study of History (Minnesota, U.S., and World) helps students to see how people in other times and places have grappled with the fundamental questions of truth, justice, and personal responsibility, to understand that ideas have real consequences, and to realize that events are shaped both by ideas and the actions of individuals.


The study of U.S. History helps students understand the democratic traditions of the United States and how these traditions were established and how they continue in the present. U.S. History also helps students understand that the United States is a nation built on ordinary and extraordinary individuals united in an on-going quest for liberty, freedom, justice, and opportunity. It helps students understand how much courage and sacrifice it has taken to win and keep liberty and justice.
The study of World History helps students understand the major developments in the civilizations of Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Asia, and the Americas. World History helps students recognize the “common problems of all humankind, and the increasing interactions among nations and civilizations that have shaped much of human life” and how individuals and nations have successfully or unsuccessfully met the challenges of human nature and their environment.
Why study History?

American History should be studied because, as Kenneth T. Jackson - chair of the Bradley Commission on History in the Schools - states, “Unlike many other peoples, Americans are not bound together by a common religion or a common ethnicity. Instead, our binding heritage is a democratic vision of liberty, equality, and justice. If Americans are to preserve that vision and bring it to daily practice, it is imperative that all citizens understand how it was shaped in the past, when events and forces either helped or obstructed it, and how it has evolved down to the circumstances and political discourses of our own time.”


World History should be studied because of the increasing global connections in the areas of commerce, politics, technology and communications, transportation, and migration and resettlement. These increasing connections make an understanding of the history of the world’s many cultures especially important in fostering the respect and understanding required in a connected and interdependent world.


UNITED STATES HISTORY GRADES K - 3













Strand

Sub-Strand

Standards

Benchmarks

Examples

I. U.S. HISTORY

A. Family Life Today and In The Past

The student will understand how families live today and in earlier times, recognizing that some aspects change over time while others stay the same.

1. Students will compare family life in his or her community from earlier times and today.

2. Students will compare family life in at least three distant places and times.

3. Students will compare technologies from earlier times and today, and identify the impact of invention on historical change.

1. Dakota and Ojibwe villages; Minnesota frontier farms; suburban towns and cities in Minnesota today; similarities and differences in work (inside/outside home), dress, manners, schools, games, festivals, stories; drawing from biographies, oral histories, and folklore

2. City of Lagos in the African kingdom of Benin or Timbuktu in the kingdom of Mali; Eastern European shtetl or Sami village in Finnmark; Mongol village

3. Transportation methods (canoes, covered wagons, cars, planes), communication methods (oral traditions, letters, cell phones, computers)

I. U.S. HISTORY

C. Many Peoples and Cultures Meet in the Making of North America

The student will demonstrate knowledge of the people who settled in North America.

1. Students will understand that large and diverse American Indian nations were the original inhabitants of North America.

2. Students will demonstrate knowledge of European exploration and settlement of the North American continent and the resulting interaction with American Indian nations.



1. Regional variations of Indian cultures (Woodland, Plains, Southwest, Pacific Northwest, and Arctic; Ojibwe, Dakota

2. Scandinavian, Spanish, Dutch, French, and English explorations, conflict, cooperation, trade, disease; Leif Eriksson; Christopher Columbus; Powhatan, Pocahontas and John Smith; Squanto and Pilgrims




UNITED STATES HISTORY GRADES 4 - 8













Strand

Sub-Strand

Standards

Benchmarks

Examples

I. U.S. HISTORY

A. Pre-history through 1607

The student will understand that large and diverse American Indian nations were the original inhabitants of North America.

1. Students will compare ways of life of Indian Nations from different regions of North America.

1. Iroquois, Cherokee, Ojibwe, Dakota, Hopi, Navajo, Yakama

I. U.S. HISTORY

B. Pre-history through 1607

The student will demonstrate knowledge of European exploration of the North American continent and the resulting interaction with American Indian nations.

1. Students will identify key European explorers and how their voyages led to the establishment of colonies.

2. Students will know and explain that interactions between American Indian tribes and European explorers had positive and negative impacts.

1. Christopher Columbus, Jacques Cartier, Henry Hudson, Ponce de Leon, John Smith

2. Trading relationships, wampum, smallpox

I. U.S. HISTORY

E. Growth and Westward Expansion, 1801-1861

The student will demonstrate knowledge of western expansion, conflict, and reform in America.

1. Students will examine the processes that led to the territorial expansion of the United States including wars and treaties with foreign nations and Indian nations, the Mexican-American War, annexation, Louisiana Purchase and other land purchases, and the removal of American Indians to reservations.

2. Students will analyze the impact of inventions and technologies on life in America, including the cotton gin, the steamboat, and the telegraph.

1. The acquisitions of Florida, Texas, Oregon, and California, the Mormon Trail, frontier families

2. The reaper, the steam locomotive, construction of canals, “King Cotton” and the expansion of slavery

I. U.S. HISTORY

G. Reshaping the Nation and the Emergence of Modern America, 1877-1916

The student will analyze the transformation of the American economy and the changing social and political conditions in response to the Industrial Revolution.

1. Students will identify and understand the reasons for the increase in immigration, growth of cities, new inventions, and political challenges to American government arising from the industrial revolution, and analyze their impact.

2. Students will identify and explain racial segregation and racism, including the rise of “Jim Crow,” the Ku Klux Klan, discrimination against immigrants, and the relocation of American Indian tribes to reservations, and analyze the impact of these actions.

3Students will analyze how the rise of big business, the growth of industry, and the change in life on American farms and small towns with increased mechanization changed life in America.



4. Students will analyze the impact of the Progressive Movement on child labor and working conditions; the rise of organized labor; women’s suffrage and the temperance movement, and identify the contributions of individuals in these movements.

1. Political attitudes toward the post-Reconstruction South, transcontinental railroad and immigrant labor, American Indian relocation to reservations

2. The growth of ethnic stereotyping, American Indian boarding schools, Wounded Knee, Chinese exclusion, Plessy v. Ferguson

3. Andrew Carnegie, Standard Oil, McCormick Reaper, Populist Movement, The Grange

4. Samuel Gompers, Theodore Roosevelt, William Jennings Bryan, Herbert Hoover, Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Jane Adams, NWSA, Frances Willard and the WCTU




UNITED STATES HISTORY GRADES 9-12













Strand

Sub-Strand

Standards

Benchmarks

Examples

I. U.S. HISTORY

A. Indigenous People of North America

The student will demonstrate knowledge of indigenous cultures in North America prior to and during western exploration.

1. Students will identify important cultural aspects and regional variations of major North American Indian nations.

1.Language groups; Mayan and Aztec architecture; regional variations of Indian agriculture, shelter forms, political organization, religion

I. U.S. HISTORY

B. Three Worlds Converge, 1450-1763

The student will understand how European exploration and colonization resulted in cultural and ecological interactions among previously unconnected peoples.

1. Students will identify the stages and motives of European oceanic and overland exploration from the 15th to the 17th centuries.

2. Students will describe the consequences of early interactions between Europeans and American Indian nations.

3. Students will describe key characteristics of West African kingdoms and the development of the Atlantic slave trade.

1. Routes taken by European explorers around Africa, to the Americas, and across the Pacific, exploitation of resources, religious conflict and missions.

2 Exchange of plants, animals, and pathogens; the impact of epidemic disease, political alliances, trade, religious conversion, treaties

3. Songhai, Saharan trade routes, Portuguese slave traders, rise of sugar plantations

I. U.S. HISTORY

B. Three Worlds Converge, 1450-1763

The student will demonstrate knowledge of the colonies and the factors that shaped colonial North America.

1. Students will compare and contrast life within the colonies and their geographical areas, including New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies, and analyze their impact.

2. Students will identify the growing differences and tensions between the European colonies, England and American Indian Nations.

1. Puritans’ “City on a Hill” in New England compared to William Penn’s Philadelphia and to Jamestown; impact of geography on regional economies and labor forms: (e.g., tobacco plantations with indentured servants and slaves, family farms, development of commerce in towns and cities)

2. Pequot War, French and Indian war

I. U.S HISTORY

F. Expansion, Innovation, and Reform, 1801-1861

The student will demonstrate knowledge of the early republic and how territorial expansion affected foreign relations.

1. Students will describe the causes and analyze the effects of the Louisiana Purchase, the War of 1812, and the Monroe Doctrine.

2. Students will analyze the impact of territorial expansion on American Indian nations and the evolution of federal and state Indian policies.

3. Students will analyze the causes and consequences of U.S. geographic expansion to the Pacific, including the concept of Manifest Destiny and the Mexican-American War.

1. Negotiations with Napoleon and arguments for and against Louisiana Purchase; Lewis and Clark, role of Sacajewea, responses of the Jefferson and Madison administrations to English, French, and Barbary actions against U.S. shipping and sailors; embargo; military campaigns of War of 1812; conflicts between American Indians and white settlers in the Old Northwest, Tecumseh; provisions and influence of Monroe Doctrine

2. Treaty negotiations and land cessions, assimilation policies, war; Indian Removal Act of 1830, establishment of reservation system, tribal sovereignty; role of Andrew Jackson; the forced relocation of American Indians

3. Diplomatic resolution of territorial competition with Britain and Russia in the Pacific Northwest; Texas War for Independence, Alamo, and debates over annexation; causes and course of war with Mexico; Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and conquest of the Southwest

I. U.S. HISTORY

J. Reshaping the Nation and the Emergence of Modern America, 1877-1916

The student will analyze the process of westward expansion in the late 19th century.

1. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the effects of post-Civil War westward expansion including the resulting conflicts with American Indian nations.

1. Transcontinental railroad, Morrill Land Act, Plains Indian Wars, Dawes Act of 1887, Wounded Knee, Carlisle Indian Industrial School, White Earth reservation, industrial mining in the southwest and Midwest (Iron Range)

I. U.S. HISTORY

J. Reshaping the Nation and the Emergence of Modern America, 1877-1916

The student will describe and analyze the linked processes of industrialization and urbanization after 1870.

1. Students will demonstrate knowledge about how the rise of corporations, heavy industry, and mechanized farming transformed the American economy, including the role of key inventions and the growth of national markets.

2. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the rapid growth of cities and the transformation of urban life, including the impact of migration from farms and new technologies, the development of urban political machines, and their role in financing, governing, and policing cities.

1. The Bessemer Steel Process and barbed wire; business leaders such as James J. Hill, John Deere, J.P. Morgan, John J. Rockefeller, and Andrew Carnegie; impact of railroads, agricultural productivity and mechanized farming, factories; new forms of marketing and advertising, trusts; Mark Twain, Ashcan school of painting, Stephen Crane; Sears catalog

2. Street lights and trolley cars, the Tweed Ring; the new middle class Victorian culture; architecture and literature

I. U.S. HISTORY

N. Post-War United States, 1945-1972

The student will understand the changes in legal definitions of individual rights in the 1960s and 1970s and the social movements that prompted them.

1. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the “rights revolution” including the civil rights movement, women’s rights movements, expansion of civil liberties, and environmental and consumer protection.

1. Thurgood Marshall and the NAACP; sit-ins; Freedom Rides; Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X; Fannie Lou Hamer, Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party; race riots (Detroit, Los Angeles, Washington, Minneapolis); Ralph Nader; Gideon v. Wainwright; Miranda v. Arizona; Rachel Carson, Silent Spring; Earth Day, 4/22/70; Clean Air Act; American Indian Movement; Equal Rights Amendment; Phyllis Schlafley; Title VII, Title IX, Equal Credit Act; Affirmative Action; Bakke decision, 1978
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