Based on a curriculum overview Sample authored by



Download 211.75 Kb.
Page1/4
Date conversion20.04.2016
Size211.75 Kb.
  1   2   3   4



based on a curriculum overview Sample authored by

Academy 20 School District

Doug Hinkle

Eric Thomas

Adams 12 Five Star School District

Jay Seller, PhD

Fountain School District

Karen Parks

Frontier Academy

Amy Long


Jefferson County School District

Beau Augustin

Poudre School District

Briana Sprecher-Kinneer

University of Northern Colorado

Mary Schuttler, PhD



This unit was authored by a team of Colorado educators. The template provided one example of unit design that enabled teacher-authors to organize possible learning experiences, resources, differentiation, and assessments. The unit is intended to support teachers, schools, and districts as they make their own local decisions around the best instructional plans and practices for all students.
Colorado’s District Sample Curriculum Project


date Posted: march 31, 2014

Drama and Theatre Arts

4th Grade



Colorado Teacher-Authored Instructional Unit Sample

Unit Title: Back in the Day… Primary Sources Come Alive





Content Area

Drama and Theatre Arts

Grade Level

4th Grade

Course Name/Course Code




Standard

Grade Level Expectations (GLE)

GLE Code

  1. Create

  1. Create characters from scripts or improvisation using voice, gestures and facial expressions

DTA09-GR.4-S.1-GLE.1

  1. Create and write simple dramas and scenes

DTA09-GR.4-S.1-GLE.2

  1. Design a scene through an inventive process, and perform the scene

DTA09-GR.4-S.1-GLE.3

  1. Perform

  1. Participate collaboratively with partners and groups

DTA09-GR.4-S.2-GLE.1

  1. Demonstrate safe use of voice and body to communicate characters

DTA09-GR.4-S.2-GLE.2

  1. Define stage direction and body positions

DTA09-GR.4-S.2-GLE.3

  1. Critically Respond

  1. Develop selected criteria to critique what is seen, heard, and understood

DTA09-GR.4-S.3-GLE.1

  1. Examine character dynamics and relations

DTA09-GR.4-S.3-GLE.2

Colorado 21st Century Skills




Critical Thinking and Reasoning: Thinking Deeply, Thinking Differently

Information Literacy: Untangling the Web

Collaboration: Working Together, Learning Together

Self-Direction: Own Your Learning

Invention: Creating Solutions

The Colorado Academic Standards for Drama and Theatre Arts are not intended to be taught in a linear (checklist of coverage) fashion, but rather should be implemented as a cyclical creative process. Each unit within this sample blueprint intentionally includes standards from all three drama and theatre arts standards to illustrate this process-based philosophy.



Unit Titles

Length of Unit/Contact Hours

Unit Number/Sequence

Back in the Day… Primary Sources Come Alive

Two Weeks/10 hours

Instructor Choice



Unit Title

Back in the Day… Primary Sources Come Alive

Length of Unit

Two Weeks/10 hours

Focusing Lens(es)

Perspective

Standards and Grade Level Expectations Addressed in this Unit

DTA09-GR.4-S.1-GLE.1, DTA09-GR.4-S.1-GLE.2, DTA09-GR.4-S.1-GLE.3

DTA09-GR.4-S.2-GLE.1, DTA09-GR.4-S.2-GLE.2, DTA09-GR.4-S.2-GLE.3

DTA09-GR.4-S.3-GLE.1, DTA09-GR.4-S.3-GLE.2


Inquiry Questions (Engaging- Debatable):

  • Why is it important to research primary sources for dramatic portrayals? (DTA09-GR.4-S.1-GLE.1,2,3) and (DTA09-GR.4-S.2-GLE.1,2,3) and (DTA09-GR.4-S.3-GLE.1,2)

  • When is it permissible to adapt primary source information for a dramatic portrayal?

Unit Strands

Create, Perform, Critically Respond

Concepts

Composition, Improvisation, Patterns, Culture, Observation, Emotions, Stereo-Type, Representation, Historical, Character, Portrayal, Source, Tension, Connection, Expression, Spectrum, Believability




Generalizations

My students will Understand that…

Guiding Questions

Factual Conceptual

Observations of historical events can inform non-stereotypical improvisation enhancing the understanding of multiple perspectives for character representations (DTA09-GR.4-S.1-GLE.1,2) and (DTA09-GR.4-S.2-GLE.1,2,3) and (DTA09-GR.4-S.3-GLE.2)

What is an example of stereotypical depictions?

What is an example of multiple perspectives on any given historical event?

Whose perspective is represented in a primary source and/or secondary source?


How do characters’ perspectives of a historical event differ?

What can be learned about characters whose perspectives are not represented in primary sources?

How do different stereotypical stage and body positions impact the image that is being created?


Patterns of tension and conflict across cultures communicate essential information about characters through time in order to make personal connections between history and current events. (DTA09-GR.4-S.1-GLE.2,3) and (DTA09-GR.4-S.2-GLE.1,2) and (DTA09-GR.4-S.3-GLE.1,2)

What conflicts, cultures, and characters are included in primary historical sources?

What cultural patterns of tension and conflict emerge from the research of an event?



How can patterns of conflict be translated from a primary historical source into a visual representation on stage (scene design, blocking, dialogue)

How can primary historical sources aid in the accurate portrayal of historical events and characters?



Interesting, dramatic compositions employ a range of emotions in order to accurately portray a spectrum of perspectives. (DTA09-GR.4-S.1-GLE.1,2) and (DTA09-GR.4-S.2-GLE.1,2,3) and (DTA09-GR.4-S.3-GLE.1,3)

What emotions are communicated through a primary source?

What words within a primary document express emotions strongly?

What facial expressions, movement, and gestures convey motivation and believability?


How can a character convey a range of emotions through the use of body?

How do words shape our impression of characters?

How can characters demonstrate relationships to each other on stage?

How does design composition impact performers?






Critical Content:

My students will Know

Key Skills:

My students will be able to (Do)

  • The conflicts and emotion within interesting stories (DTA09-GR.4-S.1-GLE.1,2) and (DTA09-GR.4-S.2-GLE.1,2,3) and (DTA09-GR.4-S.3-GLE.1,2)

  • How actors represent historical events accurately (DTA09-GR.4-S.1-GLE.1,2) and (DTA09-GR.4-S.2-GLE.1,2,3) and (DTA09-GR.4-S.3-GLE.1,2)

  • Write and/or speak expressively in order to communicate a range of emotions resulting from historical conflicts and situations (DTA09-GR.4-S.1-GLE.1,2) and (DTA09-GR.4-S.2-GLE.1,2,3) and (DTA09-GR.4-S.3-GLE.1,2)

  • Use documents to inform artistic choices in ensemble situations to create historically accurate scenes or tableaux (DTA09-GR.4-S.1-GLE.2)

  • Follow basic stage directions (DTA09-GR.4-S.1-GLE.1,2,3) and (DTA09-GR.4-S.2-GLE.1,2,3) and (DTA09-GR.4-S.3-GLE.1,2)




Critical Language: includes the Academic and Technical vocabulary, semantics, and discourse which are particular to and necessary for accessing a given discipline.

EXAMPLE: A student in Language Arts can demonstrate the ability to apply and comprehend critical language through the following statement: “Mark Twain exposes the hypocrisy of slavery through the use of satire.”



A student in ______________ can demonstrate the ability to apply and comprehend critical language through the following statement(s):

Understanding an historical event and why people in history reacted in certain ways are necessary to create accurately portrayed scenes that utilize word choice, design, body positioning, and blocking on stage.

Academic Vocabulary:

Conflict, tension, communicate, emotions, primary sources, secondary sources, portray, perspective


Technical Vocabulary:

Scene, blocking, stage direction, tableaux, dramatic compositions, ensemble, improvisation, Non-stereotypical improvisation,



Unit Description:

This unit focuses on using primary (and secondary) historical sources to develop dramatic performances that can help us better understand the perspectives of people in history and the conflicts that illuminated/reflected these perspectives. Across the duration of the unit, the students will engage in improvisation, write short monologues based on (primary and secondary) sources, and reflect on the ways in which a historical event can connect with people today. The unit culminates with a performance of the student-created monologues enhanced by tableaux and/or visuals. The unit utilizes the Colorado gold rush as a focus (see Considerations) but any historical event /conflict with multiple perspectives /points of view could be used in this unit.


Considerations:

As a 4th grade unit, the historical sources utilized here are based on a specific event in Colorado history: the Colorado gold rush of the 1850s. This event appears in every Colorado history textbook and illuminates a major industry in the state (mining) and a significant turning point in the history of the United States and western expansion (manifest destiny). But the focus, developmentally, should be on the multiple perspectives and conflict (e.g., over land rights) around this event. The goal is to accurately capture the conflict and diverse perspectives in a 4th grade appropriate manner. Teachers may also wish to consult the 4th grade social studies unit, Boom and Bust, for integrative possibilities as one of its central foci is the mining cycle of boom and bust that occurred in the late 19th century in Colorado.


Unit Generalizations

Key Generalization:

Patterns of tension and conflict across cultures communicate essential information about characters through time in order to make personal connections between history and current events

Supporting Generalizations:

Observations of historical events can inform non-stereotypical improvisation enhancing the understanding of multiple perspectives for character representations

Interesting, dramatic compositions employ a range of emotions in order to accurately portray a spectrum of perspectives




Performance Assessment: The capstone/summative assessment for this unit.

Claims:

(Key generalization(s) to be mastered and demonstrated through the capstone assessment.)



Patterns of tension and conflict across cultures communicate essential information about characters through time in order to make personal connections between history and current events

Stimulus Material:

(Engaging scenario that includes role, audience, goal/outcome and explicitly connects the key generalization)



You have been hired by a local historical agency to commemorate the Colorado gold rush by creating a news play designed to inform people (of the time) about the event. Your play will be a sequence of monologues designed to present the diversity of perspectives. That is, as a news play, you will seek to authentically document the beliefs, actions, and experiences of the miners, miners' families, tribal representatives, and/or others involved in or affected by the rush. In addition to the historical accuracy and focus, however, your play should also emphasize the significance of the gold rush; it should connect mining goals, processes, and outcomes with contemporary audiences.


Product/Evidence:

(Expected product from students)



Students will work in small groups to choose one perspective from the history of Colorado’s gold rush to present in monologue form. Working together, they will construct the monologue (based on primary and secondary sources), choose visuals and/or tableaux to enhance the monologue, create basic stage directions for the performance of the monologue, and contribute to class decisions regarding the ordering of the monologue in the context if the entire play.


Differentiation:

(Multiple modes for student expression)



Utilizing the group structure, students can take on single or multiple roles and/or participate in various tasks:

  • Performer

  • Writer

  • Stage technician

  • Director

  • Researcher




Texts for independent reading or for class read aloud to support the content

Informational/Non-Fiction

Fiction

The Cripple Creek District - Cripple Creek District Museum

Tales, Trails, and Tommyknockers: Stories from Colorado’s past - Myriam Friggens

Colorado’s Eccentric Captain Jack - Ellen Jack

Cripple Creek Days - Mabel Lee

Money Mountain - Marshall Sprague

Gold! Gold from the American river-Don Brown (1010 Lexile level)

Gold Rush Fever- Barbara Greenwood (840 Lexile level)

The Gold Rush Kid-Mary Waldorf (1010 Lexile level)

I Witness: Hard Gold: The Colorado gold rush of 1859-Avi (740 Lexile level)

Hard Gold - Avi ( 740 Lexile level)

Whistler in the Dark - Kathleen Ernst ( 680 Lexile level)





Ongoing Discipline-Specific Learning Experiences

1.

Description:

Think/work like a (theater) artist- Writing from primary and secondary sources

Teacher Resources:

http://www.childdrama.com/trail4.html (Good discussion of playwriting and one fourth grade teacher’s techniques with his students)

http://www.childdrama.com/trailappendix2.html (Good example of a news play script produced by a fourth grade teacher and his students)

http://www.ehow.com/how_8768926_write-monologue-template.html (Nice encapsulation of the steps in writing a monologue)



Student Resources:

http://www.childdrama.com/trailappendix2.html (Good example of a news play script produced by a fourth grade teacher and his students)

Skills:

Write expressively in order to communicate a range of emotions resulting from historical conflicts and situations

Assessment:

Students will use graphic organizers throughout the unit to try to capture different perspectives and motivations of people involved in the gold rush and to draft their monologues for the performance assessment

http://www.myfoa.org/docs/mentoring/lessonplans/46GraphicOrganizers.pdf

http://www.cobbk12.org/Cheathamhill/LFS%20Update/Graphic%20Organizers.htm (Great sample “Analyzing Perspectives” organizers)




2.

Description:

Think/work like a (theater) artist-Selecting appropriate and compelling visuals and tableaux to enhance spoken performance

Teacher Resources:

http://cied.uark.edu/KMisiewiczTableauInTheClassroom.pdf (Ideas for developing students’ use of tableaux)

http://inspiremykids.com/2011/tableau-bringing-theater-to-the-classroom-and-with-it-new-ways-of-learning/ (Tableaux and language arts video)

Student Resources:

http://inspiremykids.com/2011/tableau-bringing-theater-to-the-classroom-and-with-it-new-ways-of-learning/ (Tableaux and language arts video)

Skills:

Use documents to inform artistic choices in ensemble situations to create historically accurate scenes or tableaux

Assessment:

Students will create and perform tableaux across the course of the unit in preparation for final performance http://www.clta.uci.edu/documents/VideoLessons/1_Theatre_Lesson_6.pdf (Simple and clear tableaux assessment rubric)




3.

Description:

Think/work like a (theater) artist- Blocking monologue performance and corresponding visuals

Teacher Resources:

http://www.childdrama.com/trail5.html (News play rehearsal suggestions from one fourth grade teacher’s work with his students)

http://www.childdrama.com/trailappendix2.html (Good example of a news play script produced by a fourth grade teacher and his students-contains simple blocking suggestions)

Student Resources:

http://www.childdrama.com/trailappendix2.html (Good example of a news play script produced by a fourth grade teacher and his students- contains simple blocking suggestions)

Skills:

Follow basic stage directions

Assessment:

Students will practice and demonstrate knowledge of stage directions throughout the unit in preparation for final performance http://www.rcampus.com/rubricshowc.cfm?code=Z995A&sp=true (Modifiable rubric for basic stage directions)



  1   2   3   4


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page