Bardi, J. S. (2002). Give Me Immunity or Give Me Death. In



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Bardi, J. S. (2002). Give Me Immunity or Give Me Death. In The Scripps Research Institute. The Scripps Research Institute. Retrieved December 1, 2006, from http://www.scripps.edu/newsandviews/e_20021028/oldstone1.html.

The article retrieved from the website above provided background information about measles. The article also noted that the measles virus is the most contagious infectious agent to mankind. Although the article does not specifically state how measles affected the native civilizations of Mexico and Peru, the site includes a graphic depicting an Aztec man afflicted with the illness.
Couture-Spinner, Y. (2006). An approach to biology, population dynamics, and disease via the analysis of Mexican art, history, and texts. Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute. Retrieved December 13, 2006, from http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/nationalcirriculum/units/2005/2/0.5.02.08.x.html

The article retrieved from this website detailed how and why the Aztecs in Mexico were conquered. The article concerns mainly other factors of the hostile takeover but has a brief reference to the Measles epidemic of 1530-1531.


Desowitz, R. S. (1998). Who Gave Pinta to the Santa Maria? San Diego: Harcourt Brace.

The book above describes how disease from Europe infiltrated the New World. Although the book does not have many references to the Measles epidemic of 1530-1531 in Mexico and Peru, the book’s description of transoceanic exchange of disease was useful in this research paper.


Dobyns, H.F. (1997). Tubac through four centuries. Retrieved December 10, 2006, from http://www.parentseyes.arizona.edu/tubac/about.htm

The article retrieved from this website possesses information concerning the Measles epidemic of 1530-1531 in Mexico and Peru. The article has an exclusive section detailing this major epidemic and how the epidemic affected the already hindered native populations of Mexico and Peru.


Fagg, J.E. (1963). Latin America: A general history. New York: Macmillan

This print source describes the religious effects of the Measles epidemic of 1530-1531. The text provides invaluable information as to how the native peoples of Mexico and Peru were converted to Christianity under the mission system.


Fenner, F. & White, D.O. (1970). Medical Virology. New York: Academic Press.

The book above provides background information on the measles virus. The book provided a substantial amount of information on the symptoms of the disease.

Flint, S. J. (2000). Principles of virology: molecular biology, pathogenesis, and control. Washington, D.C.: ASM Press

This source again provides background information about the measles disease. The book also provides information and reasons for as to why the original strain of the measles virus that affected Mexico and Peru in 1530-1531 would not be found in today’s world.


Harding, A. S. (2000). Milestones in Health and Medicine. Phoenix, Arizona: Oryx Press.

The book above provides background information about the measles disease. The book also details the scientists and researchers involved in creating and refining the measles vaccine.


Laurance, J. (2007, January 19). Anti-measles campaign saves seven million lives. The Independent. Retrieved January 22, 2007, from http://news.independent.co.uk/world/science_technology/article2165473.ece

The newspaper article above provided information about the global campaigns against the measles diseases. The article supplied many statistics on these global efforts and also helped to convey the importance of the development of a measles vaccine.


McGrew, R. E. (1985). Encyclopedia of Medical History. New York: McGraw-Hill.

The book above explained why a population with zero exposure to a certain disease would succumb to it. The book also described the magnitude of the Measles epidemic of 1530-1531.


McNeill, W. H. (1976). Plagues and Peoples. New York: Anchor Books.

The source above provided background information about the measles disease. The book, however, also described how and why the native populations of the New World succumbed to disease and their Spanish conquistadors did not. Because of this reason, the source attributed disease as one of the primary reasons why the great civilizations of the New World, like the Aztec, fell to a group of 100 Spaniards.


Miller, F. C. (2006). Mexico. Encyclopedia Americana. Retrieved December 7, 2006, from http://ea.grolier.com/cgi-bin/article?assetid=0268980-02

This article gives information about the ties between modern day Mexico and Mexico in the times of the ancient civilizations.   The article also gives information on the culture and customs that exist today that were inherited from the ancient Mayas.


Moskowitz, R., M.D. (2003). The case against immunizations. Retrieved December 10, 2006, from http://members.aol.com/doctormosk/articles/immunizations_4.html

This site provides information about the measles vaccination. The site also provides good background data about how the MMR vaccine has impacted the lives of everyday citizens.


Orlow, E. (n.d.) Silent killers of the new world. Retrieved December 11, 2006, from http://muweb.millersville.edu/~columbus/papers/orlow-e.html

This article provides information about the European conquest of the New World and how the tiny micro parasites that they brought with them helped in this endeavor.   The Europeans brought with them a few different diseases and this source discussed them, where they came from, and the impact that it had on the civilization as a whole.

 

Ross, E. P. (1993). Jurassic Virus? Scientific American. Retrieved February 4, 2007, from http://www.sciamdigital.com/index.cfm?fa=Products.ViewIssuePreview&ISSUEID_CHAR=AO2A2913-084-4BBA-9DFC-F2ABD8F2E16&ARTICLEID_CHAR=5DD7BCDF-107E-4608-80DC-7D905BCEADE



The article retrieved from this website detailed how it may be possible to resurrect ancient viruses and bacterium from the guts of mosquitoes preserved in amber. The article was vital in explaining the natural record of viruses.
The Aztec Empire noble life and everyday life. (n.d.). Arts Curriculum Online. Retrieved January 2, 2007, from http://www.guggenheim.org/artscurriculum/lessons/aztec_L6.php

This site provides lots of information on the social hierarchy that existed in the Mayan empire.  The site also provides information on the steps in an Aztecan person’s life. For example, a young girl would be educated at home until the age of 15 at which point she would be married.






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