B group Project – Speech Analysis rutus



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Group Project – Speech Analysis
RUTUS

Be patient till the last.


Romans, countrymen, and lovers, hear me for my
cause, and be silent, that you may hear: believe me
for mine honour, and have respect to mine honour, that
you may believe: censure me in your wisdom, and
awake your senses, that you may the better judge.
If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of
Caesar's, to him I say, that Brutus' love to Caesar
was no less than his. If then that friend demand
why Brutus rose against Caesar, this is my answer:
--Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved
Rome more. Had you rather Caesar were living and
die all slaves, than that Caesar were dead, to live
all free men? As Caesar loved me, I weep for him;
as he was fortunate, I rejoice at it; as he was
valiant, I honour him: but, as he was ambitious, I
slew him. There is tears for his love; joy for his
fortune; honour for his valour; and death for his
ambition. Who is here so base that would be a
bondman? If any, speak; for him have I offended.
Who is here so rude that would not be a Roman? If
any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so
vile that will not love his country? If any, speak;
for him have I offended. I pause for a reply. (12-35)

All

None, Brutus, none.



BRUTUS

Then none have I offended. I have done no more to


Caesar than you shall do to Brutus. The question of
his death is enrolled in the Capitol; his glory not
extenuated, wherein he was worthy, nor his offences
enforced, for which he suffered death.

Enter ANTONY and others, with CAESAR's body
ANTONY

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;


I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
The evil that men do lives after them;
The good is oft interred with their bones;
So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
Hath told you Caesar was ambitious:
If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
And grievously hath Caesar answer'd it.
Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest--
For Brutus is an honourable man;
So are they all, all honourable men--
Come I to speak in Caesar's funeral.
He was my friend, faithful and just to me:
But Brutus says he was ambitious;
And Brutus is an honourable man.
He hath brought many captives home to Rome
Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill:
Did this in Caesar seem ambitious?
When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept:
Ambition should be made of sterner stuff:
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
And Brutus is an honourable man.
You all did see that on the Lupercal
I thrice presented him a kingly crown,
Which he did thrice refuse. Was this ambition?
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
And, sure, he is an honourable man.
I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,
But here I am to speak what I do know.
You all did love him once, not without cause:
What cause withholds you then, to mourn for him?
O judgment! thou art fled to brutish beasts,
And men have lost their reason. Bear with me;
My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar,
And I must pause till it come back to me. (75-109)


GROUP ONE

Julius Caesar

Group Project on Brutus’ speech to the Romans

Directions: Within your groups, read III. ii, lines 12-35 and answer the following questions.



Analyzing diction:


  1. Overall, would you classify the words in Brutus’ speech as largely monosyllabic (one syllable in length) or largely polysyllabic (more than one syllable in length)?

Give examples to support your claim; reference line numbers:





  1. What do you conclude about the effect of Brutus’ word choice considering your response to question #1 (In other words, which words teach or persuade and which merely inform?)?


  1. Would you classify the diction as largely colloquial (slang), informal (conversational), formal (literary), or old fashioned?

Give some examples of his phrases to support your claim; reference line numbers:


How does diction aid the speaker in achieving his purpose? Where does the diction fall short of its purpose?




  1. Would you say that the words that Brutus chooses are largely denotative (containing exact meaning) or connotative (containing suggested meaning, ex: gown)?

Give some examples of his phrases to support your claim; reference line numbers:




  1. Is his monologue concrete (specific) or abstract (general or conceptual)?

Give some examples to support your claim; reference line numbers:





  1. Are Brutus’ words largely euphonious (pleasant sounding) or cacophonous (harsh sounding)?

Give some examples to support your claim; reference line numbers.


  1. Final solution: According to Brutus’ diction, does he achieve his overall purpose? Where does he succeed and where does he fall short. Which area is greater? You may also consider the strengths of the Romans’ responses.


GROUP TWO

Julius Caesar

Group Project on Brutus’ speech to the Romans

Directions: Within your groups, read III. ii, lines 12-35 and answer the following questions.


Analyzing Sentence Structure:
Your will look at the sentences, as singular units and as a group of singular units that equal one large unit.



  1. How many sentences (not lines) are in this speech?



  1. How many telegraphic (shorter than 5 words) sentences are there?




  1. How many short (5-12 words) sentences are there?




  1. How many medium (13-25 words) sentences are there?




  1. How many long and involved (26+ words) are there?




  1. Examine the sentence beginnings? Is there good variety in the way the sentences begin? Is there a pattern? Is there redundancy?




  1. Examine the arrangement of ideas this one sentence: (“As Ceasar [...] I slew him” (25-7)). Explain where there is any evidence of any pattern or structure.




  1. Examine the sentence patterns (See attachment for some elements to consider.). Below, explain what type of sentence patterns we can decode in this speech.


  1. How does the speaker’s sentence patterns aid in our understanding of his purpose?


  1. Overall, how does the speaker achieve his purpose through sentence structure?

GROUP THREE

Julius Caesar
Group Project on Brutus’ speech to the Romans

Directions: Within your groups, read III. ii, lines 12-35 and answer the following questions.


You will consider the elements of logos (logic), pathos (emotion), and ethos (character) as rhetorical strategies.
1. After reading the speech, where is there evidence that Brutus includes elements of logos to appeal to the Romans (Use quotations and line numbers.)?


  1. Where do you find evidence that Brutus includes elements of pathos to appeal to the Romans (Use quotations and line numbers.)?



  1. Where do you find evidence that Brutus includes elements of ethos to appeal to the Romans (Use quotations and line numbers.)?



  1. Judge which is the dominant rhetorical strategy and explain how successful Brutus is in achieving his purpose.


GROUP FOUR
Julius Caesar

Group Project on Marc Antony’s speech to the Romans

Directions: Within your groups, read III. ii, lines 75-109 and answer the following questions.



Analyzing diction:


  1. Overall, would you classify the words in Marc Antony’s speech as largely monosyllabic (one syllable in length) or largely polysyllabic (more than one syllable in length)?

Give examples to support your claim; reference line numbers:





  1. What do you conclude about the effect of Marc Antony’s word choice considering your response to question #1 (In other words, which words teach or persuade and which merely inform?)?


  1. Would you classify the diction as largely colloquial (slang), informal (conversational), formal (literary), or old fashioned?

Give some examples of his phrases to support your claim; reference line numbers:


How does diction aid the speaker in achieving his purpose? Where does the diction fall short of its purpose?




  1. Would you say that the words that Marc Antony chooses are largely denotative (containing exact meaning) or connotative (containing suggested meaning, ex: gown)?

Give some examples of his phrases to support your claim; reference line numbers:




  1. Is his monologue concrete (specific) or abstract (general or conceptual)?

Give some examples to support your claim; reference line numbers:





  1. Are Marc Antony’s words largely euphonious (pleasant sounding) or cacophonous (harsh sounding)?

Give some examples to support your claim; reference line numbers.


  1. Final solution: According to Marc Antony’s diction, does he achieve his overall purpose? Where does he succeed and where does he fall short? Which area is greater? You may also consider the strengths of the Romans’ responses.


GROUP FIVE

Julius Caesar

Group Project on Marc Antony’s speech to the Romans

Directions: Within your groups, read III. ii, lines 75-109 and answer the following questions.


Analyzing Sentence Structure:
For your assignment, look at the sentences, as singular units and as a group of singular units that equal one large unit.


  1. How many sentences (not lines) does this speech contain?




  1. How many telegraphic (shorter than 5 words) sentences does the speech contain?




  1. How many short (5-12 words) sentences does Shakespeare include?




  1. How many medium (13-25 words) sentences lie in the speech?




  1. How many long and involved (26+ words) do you find?




  1. Examine the sentence beginnings? Is there good variety in the way the sentences begin? Is there a pattern? Is there redundancy?


  1. Examine the arrangement of ideas of this one sentence: (Here, [...] funeral” (83-6)). Explain where there appears any evidence of a pattern or structure.


  1. Examine the sentence patterns (See attachment for some elements to consider.). Below, explain what type of sentence patterns we can decode in this speech.



  1. How does the speaker’s sentence patterns aid in our understanding of his purpose?



  1. Overall, how does the speaker achieve his purpose through sentence structure?


GROUP SIX
Julius Caesar
Group Project on Marc Antony’s speech to the Romans

Directions: Within your groups, read III. ii, lines 75-109 and answer the following questions.


You will consider the elements of logos (logic), pathos (emotion), and ethos (character) as rhetorical strategies.


  1. After reading the speech, where does Marc Antony include elements of logos to appeal to the Romans (Use quotations and line numbers.)?




  1. Where do you find Marc Antony including elements of pathos to appeal to the Romans (Use quotations and line numbers.)?



  1. Where do you find evidence that Marc Antony includes elements of ethos to appeal to the Romans (Use quotations and line numbers.)?



  1. Judge which is the dominant rhetorical strategy and explain how successful Marc Antony is in achieving his purpose.


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