Australian Labour Market Update



Download 95.33 Kb.
Date conversion25.04.2016
Size95.33 Kb.

Australian Labour Market Update


January 2010

Are you looking for a job in Australia?

The Australian Labour Market Update provides information on the Australian labour market on a quarterly basis. It is intended to help people who may be interested in working in Australia on a temporary or permanent basis.

Further information on job prospects and related labour market information is available online at Australian Jobs 2008, available through www.workplace.gov.au.

Unless otherwise stated, data are from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) Labour Force Survey, November 2009.


EMPLOYMENT


Against the backdrop of the global recession, labour market conditions deteriorated in Australia over the last year, with trend employment increasing by 0.4 per cent over the 12 months to November 2009, compared with robust growth of 1.5 per cent in the previous year. While the pace of trend employment growth is down considerably from its recent peak of 28 300 jobs per month in December 2007, to an average pace of 17 300 jobs per month in November 2009, it has nonetheless remained positive since June 2009.

Forward indicators point to some further improvement in labour market conditions over the remainder of 2009-10. The rate of jobs growth, however, may not be sufficient to keep pace with the rate of population growth, which could see the unemployment rate drift higher during 2010.



Employment opportunities and growth varied across industries. Over the 12 months to November 2009, the largest increases in trend employment occurred in Health Care and Social Assistance (up 79 100) and Accommodation and Food Services (up 36 700). The strongest rates of employment growth were in Health Care and Social Assistance (7.0%), Administrative and Support Services (5.5%), and Accommodation and Food Services and Wholesale Trade (both 5.2%). Employment growth rates by industry are shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Percentage change in trend employment by industry – November 2008 to November 2009


Industry

% Change

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing

-0.7

Mining

-6.6

Manufacturing

-2.8

Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services

-9.4

Construction

-1.2

Wholesale Trade

5.2

Retail Trade

-2.8

Accommodation and Food Services

5.2

Transport, Postal and Warehousing

-3.8

Information Media and Telecommunications

-5.5

Financial and Insurance Services

-0.3

Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services

-5.5

Professional, Scientific and Technical Services

3.6

Administrative and Support Services

5.5

Public Administration and Safety

-0.5

Education and Training

2.9

Health Care and Social Assistance

7.1

Arts and Recreation Services

-2.8

Other Services

-4.4

Source: ABS Australian Labour Market Statistics, November 2009, ABS Cat. No. 6105.0.

UNEMPLOYMENT


The trend rate of unemployment was 5.7% in November 2009 compared with 4.5% in November 2008.

In the past year, trend unemployment rates have increased in Queensland (up 2.3%) and decreased in the Northern Territory (NT, down 0.3%).

In November 2009 the trend unemployment rate was highest in Queensland (6.2%) and New South Wales (5.9%) and lowest in the NT (3.5%). See Figure 2.

Generally, people in the more highly-skilled occupational groups are less likely to experience unemployment. For example, in November 2009 the unemployment rate for those who were formerly employed as Labourers was nearly four times that of former Professionals.


Figure 2: Unemployment rates (%) by State/Territory – November 2009


State/Territory

Unemployment Rate (%)

NSW

5.9

VIC

5.6

QLD

6.2

SA

5.5

WA

5.3

TAS

5.4

NT

3.5

ACT

3.6

All of Australia

5.7

MIGRANT UNEMPLOYMENT


The unemployment rates for people who migrate to Australia vary considerably. Several factors influence migrant unemployment rates including the period since arrival in Australia (with data consistently showing recently-arrived migrants have a higher unemployment rate than those who have lived in Australia for some years), skill level, age, English proficiency, recent and relevant work experience.

Figure 3 below shows unemployment rates (original data) for people now resident in Australia who were born in selected overseas countries. For example, people born in Germany and the UK and Ireland have low unemployment rates (with 2.8% and 3.4% respectively), while unemployment rates for people born in India (9.8%) and China (9.0%) are relatively high.


Figure 3: Unemployment rates (%) by selected countries of birth – November 2009


Country

Unemployment Rate (%)

Australia

4.9

Netherlands*

2.3

New Zealand

5.5

Italy*

4.1

UK and Ireland

3.4

Greece*

1.2

Malaysia*

3.2

Philippines*

8.1

Germany*

2.8

China

9.0

India

9.8

Viet Nam

6.0

Lebanon*

12.8

1Main English Speaking Countries (MESC)

3.9

Other Than Main English Speaking Countries (OTMESC)

7.2

* Estimate is subject to high sampling variability.

EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT BY OCCUPATION


Employment growth is not the only factor influencing job prospects and it is often easier to obtain a job in an occupation which is experiencing strong employment growth than one growing only slowly or declining. Over the 12 months to November 2009, the largest increases in employment (original data) occurred for Professionals (up 75 600) and Community and Personal Service Workers (up 66 100). Employment growth rates, in declining skill order, are shown below.

The unemployment rate for occupational groups generally reflects skill levels. Highly skilled occupational groups experience lower rates of unemployment, while higher unemployment rates are generally associated with less-skilled occupations. The unemployment rates (for those who had worked for two weeks or more in the past two years) by occupational group are presented in descending skill order below.



Percentage Growth Rates in Employment in the 12 months to November 2009

Managers

-5.0%

Professionals

3.4%

Technicians and Trades Workers

-5.0%

Community and Personal Service Workers

6.9%

Clerical and Administrative Workers

-1.6%

Sales Workers

0.6%

Machinery Operators and Drivers

-8.8%

Labourers

-0.7%

Unemployment Rate at November 2009

Managers

1.4%

Professionals

1.9%

Technicians and Trades Workers

3.2%

Community and Personal Service Workers

3.0%

Clerical and Administrative Workers

3.0%

Sales Workers

4.9%

Machinery Operators and Drivers

4.8%

Labourers

7.0%

Additional information on Professional and Trade occupations is provided in the following section on skilled and internet vacancies. Time series of vacancy data are not readily available for less-skilled occupations.

SKILLED AND INTERNET VACANCIES2


The Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) produces the Skilled Vacancies Index (SVI) for 18 skilled occupational groups for each State and the NT. These are aggregated into Professional, Associate Professional and Trade groups (see Figure 4 overleaf). The SVI shows where the best employment opportunities may be in the Australian labour market.

In November 2009, skilled vacancies were 35.1% lower than in November 2008. Over the 12 months, SVI decreases were recorded in all States and Territories except the NT (up 37.4%). The most significant decreases were recorded in Western Australia (WA, down 43.9%) and Queensland (down 42.5%).

In the 12 months to November 2009, advertised vacancies decreased for Professional occupations (down 35.9%) and for Trade Occupations (down 35.2%). The most notable decreases were for Organisation and Information Professionals (down 57.4%), Metal Trades (down 51.2%) and Electrical and Electronics Trades (down 49.4%).

DEEWR also produces the Internet Vacancies Index (IVI) based on vacancies lodged on four recruitment websites for 48 occupational clusters across all skill levels and for the eight major occupational groups for each State and Territory. IVI vacancies are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations3.

In November 2009, internet vacancies were 36.1% lower than in November 2008. Over the 12 months, IVI decreases were recorded in all States and Territories. The most significant IVI decreases were in Queensland (down 44.3%), WA (down 43.8%) and New South Wales (down 34.2%).

In the 12 months to November 2009, internet vacancies decreased for Professionals (down 42.2%) and for Technicians and Trades Workers (down 35.2%). The most notable decreases were for Engineers (down 65.4%), Transport and Design Professionals, and Architects (down 59.3%), Science Professionals and Veterinarians (down 57.0%), Engineering, Information and Communications Technology (ICT) and Science Technicians, Inspectors (down 52.5%), Numerical Clerks (down 47.8%) and Office Managers, Administrators and Secretaries (down 45.3%). No occupational cluster recorded an increase.


Figure 4: Skilled Vacancies Index, January 1988 to November 2009


This image has been deleted but is available in the PDF of this publication. This graph shows the monthly Skilled Vacancy Index (SVI) from January 1988 to November 2009 for Professionals and Trades. The SVI is based on a count of skilled vacancies in major metropolitan newspapers in each State and the Northern Territory, usually on the first Saturday of each month. The data are trend data (2007=100). In view of the trending procedure, figures for the six months prior to the current month are subject to revision. Source: Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, SVI Seasonally and Trended Data (November 2009). Go to www.skillsinfo.gov.au/skills/LMI/VacancyReport/ to access SVI Reports.

FUTURE JOB PROSPECTS


Future job prospects depend on many factors, some of which are difficult to predict. Prospects differ between and within States and Territories and can change rapidly. Even in occupations with below average prospects, employment opportunities arise from labour turnover. This information should therefore be used with caution.

The following future job prospect ratings are for the period to 2013-14. The ratings are based on employment trends and projected growth, unemployment rates, SVI trends (where available), and other data. The global recession may adversely affect prospects for some occupational groups in the short term.



In the following table G stands for good prospects, A for average prospects and BA for below average prospects.45

Occupational Group

Prospects to 2013-14

Occupational Group

Prospects to 2013-14

Managers and Administrators




Social Workers

G

Child Care Co-ordinators

G

Specialist Medical Practitioners

G

Professionals




Associate Professionals




Computing Professionals

G

Civil Engineering Associate Professionals

A

Dentists

G

Dental Therapists, Technicians and Hygienists

G

General Medical Practitioners

G

Electrical Engineering Associate Professionals

A

Mechanical Engineers

A

Enrolled Nurses

G

Medical Imaging Professionals

G

Mechanical Engineering Associate Professionals

A

Occupational Therapists

G

Tradespersons




Pharmacists

G

Bakers and Pastrycooks

G

Physiotherapists

G

Cabinetmakers

G

Primary School Teachers

G

Clothing Tradespersons

BA

Registered Mental Health Nurses

G

Lift Mechanics

G

Registered Midwives

G

Panel Beaters

A

Registered Nurses

G

Printing Machinists

A

Secondary School Teachers

G

Wood Machinists and Other Wood Tradespersons

BA

The Australian Labour Market Update uses the latest available detailed and consistent data at time of production. However, the labour market can change quickly and should be re-assessed prior to making a decision to lodge a visa application. Queries relating to this publication should be emailed to migration@deewr.gov.au.



Hot Topic


January 2010

DENTAL PRACTITIONERS


In the Australian labour market, dental practitioners6 diagnose and treat dental disease, restore normal oral function using a broad range of treatments, such as surgery and other specialist techniques, and advise on oral health. The entry requirement for employment is a bachelor degree in a relevant field of study awarded under the Australian Qualifications Framework. Registration with the relevant State or Territory Dental Board is required.

Research by the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) shows dental practitioners have good job prospects in the Australian labour market7.


LABOUR MARKET PROFILE OF DENTAL PRACTITIONERS


Australian Bureau of Statistics data show employment of dental practitioners has risen strongly in the past five years to August 2008. Steady employment growth is expected for the next five years with most dental practitioners employed in the health care and social assistance industries. Table A provides a labour market profile for dental practitioners based on Job Outlook Online data (see www.joboutlook.gov.au).

Table A: Dental Practitioners – Key Labour Market Indicators8


Key Indicator

Dental Practitioners

All Occupations

Occupation size

11 500

10 788 100

Females

18.1%

45.1%

Males

81.9%

54.9%

Median age

50 years

39 years

Full-time share of employment

80.2%

71.7%

Average weekly hours (full-time)

40.5

41.8

Weekly earnings (full-time & before tax)

$1 600

$940

Vacancy level

Low

not available

Annual employment growth over 5 years

-0.3% per annum

2.1% per annum

Future employment growth (to 2013-14)

Steady

not available

Job Prospects (to 2013-14)

Good

not available

REGIONAL EMPLOYMENT


Dental practitioners are employed across all States and Territories.

The average of the four quarters to November 2009 showed the majority of dental practitioners were employed in New South Wales (3 213), Victoria (3 141) and Queensland (2 568). See Figure 1 (original data).

Demand is strong across all States and Territories of Australia and the industry overall reported difficulty in attracting and retaining experienced dental practitioners.

Figure 1: Number of Dental Practitioners by State/Territory (to November 2009)


State/Territory

Number of Dental Practitioners

NSW

3213

VIC

3141

QLD

2568

SA

1512

WA

1692

TAS

125

NT

118

ACT

338

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey (original data)

SKILLS ASSESSMENT FOR OVERSEAS-QUALIFIED DENTAL PRACTITIONERS


One of the threshold criteria for permanent entry to Australia as a primary applicant in the General Skilled Migration (GSM) categories is the assessment of an applicant’s skills (qualifications and work experience) by an Australian assessing authority appointed for their nominated occupation. Assessing authorities have been appointed by the Australian Government to undertake assessments of whether an applicant has skills appropriate to employment in their nominated profession, associate profession or trade occupation in Australia. These assessing authorities are not employment agencies and are not in a position to directly assist migrants or visa applicants to find jobs in Australia.

The Australian Dental Council (ADC) is the appointed Australian assessing authority for overseas-qualified dentists. Overseas-qualified dentists are eligible to apply for an ADC Assessment if they have successfully completed a dental degree which included at least four years full-time academic study and are registered to practice (in the country in which they acquired their overseas qualification or another country in which they have recent and relevant employment experience as a registered dental practitioner). Applicants with qualifications from New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland are not required to undertake an ADC Assessment and may apply directly to the appropriate State or Territory Dental Board for registration.

The ADC Assessment comprises three parts: an Occupational English Test (OET); a Preliminary Examination to test knowledge of the science and practice of dentistry and of clinical and technical procedures as practised in Australia; and a Final (Clinical) Examination to evaluate clinical competence in terms of dental knowledge, clinical skills and professional attitudes for the safe and effective clinical practice of dentistry in Australia. Applicants assessed as suitable by the ADC must obtain an A or B grade in all four sub-tests of the OET and pass both the Preliminary and Final Examinations.

Upon successful completion of an ADC Assessment, applicants are eligible to receive a Certificate issued by the ADC and are then eligible to apply for registration with the Dental Board in the State or Territory in Australia in which they wish to practice. Additional requirements for registration may apply in some States or Territories.

Overseas-qualified dental specialists should apply directly to the appropriate State or Territory Dental Board for registration and not to the ADC for an assessment. State and Territory Dental Boards may seek the advice of the ADC.

More detailed information is available on the Australian Skills Recognition Information website at www.immi.gov.au/asri/a-z.htm and the ADC website at www.adc.org.au.


EMPLOYER-SPONSORED MIGRATION


An alternative to migrating to Australia through the GSM categories is to enter through employer-sponsorship. The Australian Government has in place several employer-sponsored migration arrangements, including the Temporary Business Long Stay Arrangement, Employer Nomination Scheme, Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme and Labour Agreements. Labour Agreements are designed to enable employers to recruit highly-skilled workers from overseas or from people temporarily in Australia, where an employer has not been able to fill vacancies from the Australian labour market through domestic recruitment or training. Detailed information on these migration arrangements is on the DIAC website www.immi.gov.au.

SEEKING EMPLOYMENT IN AUSTRALIA


Overseas-trained dental practitioners seeking to work in Australia who are not Australian citizens or permanent residents will need to contact the nearest Australian Embassy, Consulate or High Commission to apply for a visa with a work right. Addresses of all Australian Embassies, High Commissions and Consulates are available from the DIAC website at www.immi.gov.au/contacts.

Overseas-trained dental practitioners should note that acceptance of overseas qualifications for migration does not guarantee employment in the profession in Australia. Employment will depend on other factors, such as the number of vacancies available, skill needs in the Australian labour market, meeting State and Territory registration requirements and suitability for employment in a particular job in Australia.



1 MESC are the United Kingdom, Ireland, South Africa, Canada, the United States of America and New Zealand.

2 Historical series of trend figures for SVI are revised monthly; the IVI is based on a three month moving average.

3 Australian Bureau of Statistics, Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations – First Edition (Cat. No. 1220.0).

4 These are examples from the skilled classifications categories – refer to the Australian Standard Classification of Occupations (ASCO), Second Edition (ABS Cat. No. 1220.0).

5 Job prospect ratings are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO), First Edition (ABS Cat. No. 1220.0)

6 Includes the occupations of dentist and dental specialist.

7See www.workplace.gov.au/workplace/Publications/LabourMarketAnalysis/SkillShortages/StateandTerritorySkillShortagelists for more details.

8 Occupation size for All Occupations is from ABS trended data (August 2008) and annual employment growth for the last 5 years is based on DEEWR labour market research (data to August 2008).

ISSN 1833-413X


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page