Auckland District Health Board


Table : Most common cancer registrations for Māori by site, all ages, Auckland DHB, 2008–2012



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Cancer


Table : Most common cancer registrations for Māori by site, all ages, Auckland DHB, 2008–2012

Gender and site

Māori

Non-Māori

Māori/non-Māori

ratio (95% CI)



Rate difference

Ave. no. per year

Age-standardised
rate per 100,000 (95% CI)

Ave. no. per year

Age-standardised
rate per 100,000 (95% CI)

Female

All cancers

58

235.4

(209.5,

264.5)

830

189.6

(183.1,

196.4)

1.24

(1.10,

1.40)

45.8

Breast

19

78.5

(64.1,

96.1)

258

64.9

(61.2,

68.8)

1.21

(0.98

1.49)

13.6

Lung

10

39.1

(29.7,

51.6)

61

10.2

(9.0,

11.6)

3.82

(2.82,

5.18)

28.9

Uterus

4

17.8

(11.5,

27.4)

47

11.4

(10.0,

13.1)

1.55

(0.99,

2.45)

6.3

Colorectal

3

11.3

(6.6,

19.1)

100

16.5

(14.9,

18.3)

0.68

(0.40,

1.17)

-5.3

Male

All cancers

50

232.4

(205.0,

263.4)

822

185.7

(179.4,

192.3)

1.25

(1.10,

1.42)

46.6

Lung

9

41.1

(30.8,

55.0)

78

14.3

(12.8

15.9)

2.89

(2.12,

3.93)

26.9

Prostate

9

39.9

(29.6,

53.8)

217

45.6

(42.9,

48.6)

0.87

(0.64,

1.19)

-5.7

Colorectal

5

25.1

(17.0,

36.9)

104

20.6

(18.7,

22.6)

1.22

(0.82,

1.81)

4.5

Liver

4

16.8

(10.7,

26.4)

24

5.7

(4.6,

7.0)

2.97

(1.81,

4.87)

11.2

Source: Cancer Registry, Ministry of Health
Note Ratios in bold show that Māori rates were significantly different from non-Māori rates in the DHB.

There were 58 cancer registrations per year on average among Māori females, at a rate 24% higher than non-Māori. The most common cancers registered for Māori females were breast (33% of all cancers), lung, uterine, and colorectal cancer. Registration rates were higher for Māori than non-Māori women for cancer of the lung (3.8 times as high).

Among Māori males there were 50 cancer registrations per year on average, at a rate 25% higher than non-Māori. Lung (18% of all cancers), prostate (also 18% of all cancers), colorectal, and liver cancer were the most common cancers registered for Māori males. Compared to non-Māori males, rates were higher for Māori for lung cancer (close to 3 times as high), liver cancer (3 times as high).

Table : Most common cancer deaths for Māori by site, all ages, Auckland DHB, 2007–2011



Gender and site

Māori

Non-Māori

Māori/non-Māori

ratio (95% CI)



Rate difference

Ave. no. per year

Age-standardised
rate per 100,000 (95% CI)

Ave. no. per year

Age-standardised
rate per 100,000 (95% CI)







Female

All cancers

24

95.4

(79.6,

114.4)

310

51.0

(47.9,

54.3)

1.87

(1.55,

2.27)

44.5

Lung

8

33.2

(24.4,

45.1)

49

7.7

(6.6,

8.9)

4.33

(3.08,

6.07)

25.5

Digestive organs

5

21.5

(14.7,

31.6)

85

11.4

(10.1,

12.8)

1.89

(1.27,

2.82)

10.1

Breast

4

14.3

(9.0,

22.8)

48

9.8

(8.5,

11.4)

1.45

(0.89,

2.36)

4.5

Genital organs

2

6.5

(3.2,

13.2)

38

7.3

(6.2,

8.6)

0.90

(0.44,

1.84)

-0.8

Male

All cancers

22

105.3

(87.2,

127.1)

319

59.0

(55.7,

62.4)

1.78

(1.47,

2.17)

46.3

Lung

8

36.0

(26.2,

49.5)

61

11.0

(9.7,

12.4)

3.27

(2.32,

4.60)

25.0

Digestive organs

7

31.9

(22.6,

45.0)

106

20.4

(18.6,

22.4)

1.56

(1.10,

2.23)

11.5

Prostate

1

7.0

(3.3,

14.7)

34

4.6

(3.9,

5.5)

1.51

(0.71,

3.24)

2.4

Source: Death registrations, Ministry of Health
Note Ratios in bold show that Māori rates were significantly different from non-Māori rates in the DHB.

For Māori females, deaths from cancer accounted for 34% of all deaths, with a rate 87% higher than that of non-Māori during 2007–2011. Lung cancer was the most common cause of cancer death, with a rate 4.3 times as high as for non-Māori. Cancers of the digestive organs (mainly colorectal, stomach, pancreas) were the next leading causes of cancer death. Mortality rates for stomach and pancreatic cancers were higher for Māori than for non-Māori women (see accompanying Excel tables). Breast cancer and cancers of the genital organs were the next most common causes of cancer death for Māori women.

For Māori males, cancer deaths accounted for 30% of all deaths, with a rate 78% higher than that of non-Māori males. Lung cancer was the most common cause of cancer death at a rate 3.3 times the non-Māori rate. The next most common were cancers of the digestive organs (mainly liver and colorectal), and prostate cancer. Mortality rates for liver cancer were 3.4 times as high for Māori as for non-Māori men.

Breast and cervical cancer screening


Table : BreastScreen Aotearoa breast screening coverage, women aged 45–69 years, Auckland DHB, 24 months to 31 December 2014

Māori

Non-Māori

Number screened

Eligible population

% screened

Number screened

Eligible population

% screened

2,846

4,400

64.7%

41,715

60,540

68.9%

Source: National Screening Unit, Ministry of Health

BreastScreen Aotearoa provides free mammography screening for breast cancer to women aged 45 to 69 years, with a target of at least 70% of eligible women screened every two years. During the two years to the end of 2014, 65% of Māori women and 69% of non-Māori women in Auckland DHB had been screened.

Table : Cervical screening coverage, women aged 25–69 years, Auckland DHB, 3 years and 5 years to 31 December 2014

Māori

Non-Māori

Eligible population

Women screened in last 5 years

5-year coverage %

Women screened in last 3 years

3-year coverage %

Eligible population

Women screened in last 5 years

5-year coverage %

Women screened in last 3 years

3-year coverage %

9,357

6,682

71.4%

5,246

56.1%

120,240

115,292

95.9%

97,003

80.7%

Source: National Screening Unit, Ministry of Health
Note: Population is adjusted for hysterectomy.

Among women aged 25 to 69 years, 71% of Māori women and 96% of non-Māori women had had a cervical smear test during the five years prior to 31 December 2014. The three-year cervical screening coverage was 56% for Māori women and 81% for non-Māori women. The National Cervical Screening Programme has a three-year screening coverage target of 80% of eligible women aged 25 to 69 years.







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