Auckland District Health Board



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Mauri ora: Pakeke

− Adults




This section focuses mainly on long term conditions among adults, including heart disease and stroke, cancer, diabetes, respiratory disease (asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), mental disorders, and gout. Information is also presented on hip fractures, hip replacements and cataract surgery. Self-assessed health status and smoking status are also included.

Information on other causes of hospitalisation or deaths in Auckland can be found in the accompanying Excel© tables labelled ‘Death registrations’ and ‘Hospitalisations by principal diagnosis’. For example, the hospitalisations table shows higher rates of admission for Māori than for non-Māori for thyroid disorders, epilepsy, atrial fibrillation, bronchiectasis, gastric ulcers, gallstones, pancreatitis, glomerular disease, renal failure, and head injuries.



The New Zealand Health Survey provides other information on long term conditions and risk factors that have been shown to be more common for Māori adults than other adults at a national level, including medicated blood pressure, obesity, chronic pain, arthritis, oral disease, and mental distress (Ministry of Health 2014).

Self-assessed health


Table : Health status reported by Māori aged 15 years and over, Auckland DHB, 2013

Health status

Auckland DHB

New Zealand

Estimated number

%

(95% CI)

%

(95% CI)

Excellent

6,500*

21.1*

(14.4,

27.8)

18.1

(16.8,

19.3)

Very good

13,500

43.4

(35.7,

51.1)

37.0

(35.5,

38.5)

Good

6,500*

20.8*

(14.2,

27.5)

28.5

(27.3,

29.7)

Fair / poor

4,500*

14.7*

(9.4,

20.0)

16.4

(15.3,

17.5)

Source: Te Kupenga 2013, Statistics New Zealand customised report.
Note: * sampling error is 30% or more but less than 50%.

Two-thirds of Auckland Māori adults (65%) reported having excellent or very good health and a fifth (21%) described their health as good. One in six (15%) reported having fair or poor health status.


Smoking status


Table : Cigarette smoking status, 15 years and over, Auckland DHB, 2006 and 2013

Smoking status

Māori

Non-Māori

Māori/non-Māori

ratio (95% CI)



Difference in proportion

Number

%

(95% CI)

Number

%

(95% CI)

2006

Regular smoker

7,368

36.6

(36.0,

37.3)

40,950

15.5

(15.4,

15.7)

2.36

(2.31,

2.41)

21.1

Ex-smoker

3,894

19.2

(18.7,

19.8)

50,043

16.0

(15.8,

16.1)

1.21

(1.17,

1.24)

3.3

Never smoked

8,670

44.0

(43.3,

44.7)

182,532

68.5

(68.3,

68.7)

0.64

(0.63,

0.65)

-24.5

2013

Regular smoker

5,706

26.2

(25.6,

26.8)

30,261

10.4

(10.3,

10.5)

2.52

(2.46,

2.59)

15.8

Ex-smoker

4,851

21.6

(21.1,

22.1)

52,335

14.9

(14.8,

15.0)

1.45

(1.41,

1.49)

6.7

Never smoked

11,097

52.3

(51.6,

52.9)

215,754

74.7

(74.5,

74.8)

0.70

(0.69,

0.71)

-22.4

Source: 2006 and 2013 Census, Statistics New Zealand
Notes: % is age-standardised to the 2001 Māori population. Regular smokers smoke one or more cigarettes per day.

Between 2006 and 2013 the proportion of Māori adults who smoked cigarettes regularly decreased from 37% to 26%. There was a corresponding increase in those who had never smoked and an increase in ex-smokers. The absolute difference between Māori and non-Māori smoking rates decreased by nearly six percentage points. However, Māori in Auckland DHB remained around 2.5 times as likely as non-Māori to smoke regularly in 2013.





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