Auckland District Health Board


Potentially preventable hospitalisations



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Potentially preventable hospitalisations


Potentially preventable hospitalisations can be categorised into those which are considered potentially avoidable and those more likely to be unavoidable. Potentially avoidable hospitalisations are those resulting from diseases preventable through population-based health promotion strategies and those related to the social determinants of health. Addressing these can require actions beyond the health care system, including intersectoral actions.

A subgroup of potentially avoidable hospitalisations, ambulatory care sensitive hospitalisations (ASH) reflect hospitalisations for conditions considered sensitive to preventive or treatment interventions in primary care. It is also recognised that while access to effective primary care is important in reducing ASH, addressing the factors which drive the underlying burden of disease such as housing, or second hand smoke exposures, is also important.

Table : Potentially avoidable hospitalisations for children aged 1 month to 14 years, Auckland DHB, 2011–2013

Gender

Māori

Non-Māori

Māori/non-Māori

ratio (95% CI)



Rate difference

Ave. no. per year

Rate per 100,000 (95% CI)

Ave. no. per year

Rate per 100,000 (95% CI)

Female

295

5,365.9

(5,022.5,

5,732.8)

1,658

4,554.3

(4,429.3,

4,682.8)

1.18

(1.10,

1.27)

811.6

Male

358

6,194.0

(5,833.0,

6,577.5)

1,995

5,189.7

(5,059.7,

5,323.0)

1.19

(1.12,

1.27)

1,004.4

Total

653

5,780.0

(5,528.5,

6,042.9)

3,653

4,872.0

(4,781.5,

4,964.2)

1.19

(1.13,

1.25)

908.0

Source: NMDS
Note: Ratios in bold show that Māori rates were significantly different from non-Māori rates in the DHB.

On average, there were 653 potentially avoidable hospitalisations per year among Māori children aged 14 years and under, at a rate 19% higher than the non-Māori rate, or 908 more admissions per 100,000.

Table : Ambulatory care sensitive hospitalisations for children aged 1 month to 14 years, Auckland DHB, 2011–2013

Gender

Māori

Non-Māori

Māori/non-Māori

ratio (95% CI)



Rate difference

Ave. no. per year

Rate per 100,000 (95% CI)

Ave. no. per year

Rate per 100,000 (95% CI)







Female

201

3,707.0

(3,421.1,

4,016.9)

1,140

3,158.0

(3,053.8,

3,265.8)

1.17

(1.08,

1.28)

549.0

Male

231

4,085.3

(3,791.2,

4,402.2)

1,293

3,392.0

(3,286.7,

3,500.6)

1.20

(1.11,

1.31)

693.3

Total

432

3,896.1

(3,688.7,

4,115.2)

2,433

3,275.0

(3,200.6,

3,351.2)

1.19

(1.12,

1.26)

621.1

Source: NMDS
Note: Ratios in bold show that Māori rates were significantly different from non-Māori rates in the DHB.

On average there were 432 admissions per year for ambulatory care sensitive conditions among Māori children, at a rate 19% higher than that of non-Māori children, or 621 more admissions per 100,000 children.





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