Asteroid Affirmative



Download 0.74 Mb.
Page49/66
Date conversion29.04.2016
Size0.74 Mb.
1   ...   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   ...   66

Detection – Adaptive Membrane Telescopes



Adaptive Membrane Telescopes are lightweight and inexpensive

Bekey ‘07(Ivan Bekey is the president of Bekey Designs Inc. and former Director of Advanced Programs in the Office of Space Flight at NASA. “Extremely large yet very low weight and low cost space based telescopes for detection of 140 meter diameter asteroids at 5.7 AU, and obtaining 6 year warning times for 1 km diameter comets”. White Paper presented at the March 2007 Planetary Defense Conference at George Washington University in Washington D.C. April 16, 2007. http://www.aero.org/conferences/planetarydefense/documents/Bekey%20White%20Paper.pdf TDA)

All elements of the telescope will be designed using microminiaturized components, and can be astonishingly lightweight, as shown in Figure 8 for a 25 meter clear diameter primary aperture. The weight is that of the complete telescope, not just the primary mirror. All weights are the result of conceptual-level designs. The areal densities attained are 0.07 kg/m 2 for the primary mirror assembly and 0.53 kg/m 2 for the entire telescope. These are phenomenally lower than attainable by any other known technique. The weight of telescopes designed with this technique, as well as those of Hubble and JWST-based designs, were scaled with aperture diameter and the curves appear in Figure 9. It is seen that the weight advantages of the present space telescope concept are compelling, being 4 orders of magnitude lighter than Hubble-type designs and 2 orders of magnitude lighter than JWST designs In order to visualize the dramatic advantages offered by this new design paradigm it is compared to three other conceptual level space telescopes, each of them 25 meters aperture diameter. Two of them are the Hubble and JWST technologies extrapolated to 25 meter apertures, and one is a new technology telescope using an advanced allinflatable non-adaptive one-stage corrected telescope design concept. These are illustrated in Figure 10. It is seen that the Adaptive Membrane structureless design is 4 orders of magnitude lighter than the one scaled using Hubble-type technologies, which would weigh millions of kg. It is also 2 orders of magnitude lighter than one scaled using JWST technologies, which would weigh some 20,000 kg. It is 20 times lighter than the best inflatable membrane design concept, which would still weigh some 4,000 kg. In contrast a 25 meter diameter telescope using the Adaptive Membrane structureless concept will weigh less than 300 kg! While it is always hazardous to estimate costs for new technology telescopes, if cost continues to scale as weight, as it has done for essentially all past and current technology space systems, the cost of a telescope using the techniques described herein could well approach the same 2-4 orders of magnitude reduction as the weight. If that were the case then a 25 meter diameter space telescope would have a cost in the tens of millions rather the tens of billions it would cost if built using JWST technology and techniques. An example of a NEO/astronomical neardiffraction-limited telescope in solar orbit is shown on Figure 11. If the telescope had a 100% filled apertures of 25 meters diameter its total weight would be 260 kg; for a 100% filled aperture of 50 meters diameter its weight would be 600 kg; and for a 100% filled aperture of 75 meters diameter the total weight would be 1,100 kg. In addition a 250 meter diameter 10% sparse aperture telescope was sized, and would only weigh 1,600 kg


Detection – Adaptive Membrane Telescopes - Feasible



Adaptive Membrane Telescopes are technologically feasible – developed in less than ten years

Bekey ‘07(Ivan Bekey is the president of Bekey Designs Inc. and former Director of Advanced Programs in the Office of Space Flight at NASA. “Extremely large yet very low weight and low cost space based telescopes for detection of 140 meter diameter asteroids at 5.7 AU, and obtaining 6 year warning times for 1 km diameter comets”. White Paper presented at the March 2007 Planetary Defense Conference at George Washington University in Washington D.C. April 16, 2007. http://www.aero.org/conferences/planetarydefense/documents/Bekey%20White%20Paper.pdf)

The basic concept applied to a 25 meter telescope was defined and shown to be feasible in funded team studies led by the proposer, performed initially for NIAC and then in much greater depth and with 5 subcontractors for the NRO. The principal technologies that need to be matured are the primary reflector, the liquid crystal second stage corrector, and the metrology and propulsion techniques necessary for precision formation flying. The primary membrane reflector requires development of piezoelectric film materials resistant to the space environment and having smooth surface; demonstration of membrane folding and deployment via shape memory material coating; and demonstration of closed loop shaping using a remote electron gun. Of these the latter is underway in the laboratory by The Aerospace Corporation. The estimated TRL is 3. The liquid crystal corrector must developed and demonstrated to have at least 500 waves of correction capability simultaneously with low scatter and reasonable time constant. Early laboratory experiments have pointed the way, though its estimated TRL level is 2. Precision formation flying requires development of microgyros and sunsensors, which are underway; RF and optical metrology sensors which are being developed for related space applications; development and demonstration of micromachined FEEP thrusters, which is underway by DARPA at an estimated TRL level of 2-3. Simulation of a complete system including metrology and micropropulsion is also needed, and its estimated TRL level is 3. Thus the overall estimated TRL level of the space telescope system is more than 2 but less than 3. These are not extremely difficult developments. Some of the required technologies are already being pursued in the laboratory, and a roadmap exists for their demonstration in space. Since the technologies are simpler and inherently require many fewer man-hours for development than conventional space telescopes, it should not take more than about 5 years to demonstrate them, first in the lab working separately and then in space with a small scale experiment with all technologies working together. It is because of this that it is likely that a complete 25 meter diameter aperture space telescope could probably be fielded in about 10 years. Phase A industry studies must be performed with the author’s feasibility studies as a starting point. Phase B and C would then follow. A single space telescope would suffice. The likely cost of such a development would be astonishingly small compared to costs of conventional space telescopes. Thus an affordable and powerful means of detecting, tracking, and cataloguing asteroids smaller than 140 meters at great distances could be implemented relatively rapidly. This same telescope could also provide long distance detection of new apparition long-period comets, providing warning times of 6 years or more on typical 1 km diameter comets.
1   ...   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   ...   66


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page