Asian Art Museum uc berkeley History-Social Science Project 2012 Medieval Japan Summer Institute



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Asian Art Museum

UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project

2012 Medieval Japan Summer Institute

Institute Lesson Plan



Caitlin Everett 7th grade SDC Teacher
Unit Topic: Medieval Japan

(See Medieval Japan Unit Map provided.)


Unit Focus Question:

How did medieval Japan's acts of borrowing from other parts of Asia shape their culture?


Unit Teaching Thesis:

Recognizing their geographical isolation, the Japanese chose to blend ideas of government, religion, and art from nearby civilizations (especially China and Korea) with their own traditions to create a unique culture.


History-Social Science Content Standard:

7.5 Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the civilizations of Medieval Japan.



  1. Describe the significance of Japan’s proximity to China and Korea and the intellectual, linguistic, religious, and philosophical influence of those countries on Japan.


6 -8 Historical and Social Sciences Analysis Skills:

Historical Interpretation



  1. Students understand and distinguish cause, effect, sequence, and correlation in historical events, including the long- and short-term causal relations.


Common Core Standards: Reading Standards for Literacy in History / Social Studies 6-12: Grade 6-8 Students:

2. Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary

of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions

5. Analyze how a text uses structure to emphasize key points or advance an explanation or analysis


Common Core Standards: Wring Standards for Literacy in History / Social Studies 6-12: Grade 6-8 Students:

1. Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.

a. Introduce claim(s) about a topic or issue, acknowledge and distinguish the claim(s) from alternate

or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically.

b. Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant, accurate data and evidence that demonstrate

an understanding of the topic or text, using credible sources.

c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s),

counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from or supports the argument presented.

Lesson Plan

Lesson Topic: Buddhism in Japan
Lesson Focus Questions: How did contact with Korea influence Japanese religion?
Lesson Teaching Thesis: Contact with Korea introduced Japanese to the religion of Buddhism which began to spread and eventually was combined with Shinto beliefs to create a unique form of Buddhism in Japan.
Text: TCI History Alive, pg 226 & 227

Primary Sources:


  • Seated Buddha Amitabha (Japanese: Amida),Japan. Heian period (794-1185)

Lacquer and gold on wood,

The Avery Brundage Collection, B60S10+


  • Seated Buddha, approx. 300-500
    Pakistan; perhaps Jamalgarhi, Peshawar valley, ancient region of Gandhara
    The Avery Brundage Collection, Asian Art Museum, B60S393


Primary Source Analysis: Analyzing a Primary Source (Primary source key included).

Writing Instruction:

  • Writing About the Primary Sources

  • Basic Analytical Paragraph – from reading activity

Writing Question: How did contact with Korea influence Japanese Religion?
Reading Instruction: Main Idea and Highlighting
Lesson Procedures:

I. Introduction-



Materials

Maps showing spread of Buddhism to Japan.

Projector to enlarge image for students


  1. Map Activity

  2. Pass out a copy of the maps showing the spread of Buddhism.

  3. Class Discussion. Look at suggested Teacher Questions.

II. Primary Document Analysis



Materials

Projector to enlarge images for students

Copies of Looking for Clues A & B

Color copies for each group *optional*



  1. Explain focus question, might need to explain the word influence.

  2. Show image for Primary Source A.

  3. Complete with students boxes 1 – Title of Source and 2 – Audience of Analyzing a Primary Source.

  4. Show Map 1 to give context for box 3 – Place and Time.

  5. Discuss information for box 3 – Place and Time and box 4 – Historical Context. Have students record discussion/information.

  6. Have students complete box 5- Description of Source in pairs or one large group.

  7. Use the student’s Description of Source observations to give information for box 6 – Meaning. (Teacher Note: Students need help to add content to their observations to create meaning - review Teacher Context Sheet for additional support to teacher for the meaning.)

  8. Use the Description of Source and meaning boxes to help students make inferences to answer the focus question.

  9. Repeat steps 1-8 for Primary Source B

  10. Use primary sources to complete “Writing about the Primary Sources” worksheet.

III. Reading Strategy – Main Idea and Highlighting



Materials

Copies of the Reading

Highlighters

Poster with key word criteria *optional*



  1. First, review previous lesson and focus question. Have students identify key words in the focus question.

  2. In pairs, ask students to identify what kind of information they might need to know in order to answer the focus question. Share out with class.

  3. Review how effective readers of history identify key words.

    • Words or synonyms for words that are in the focus question

    • Words that repeat or synonyms for words that repeat

    • Words that are followed by a definition (appositives)

    • Names, dates, locations

    • Add any other criteria that your class is familiar with

  1. Pass out the reading and highlighters.

  2. Have students watch and follow along as you highlight and explain your key words in the first paragraphs. Solicit suggestions for key words and ask what criteria they used to determined key words.

  3. With students, add annotations on the margins of the highlighted text. Annotations include:

    • Reasons why evidence is important

    • Connections between different pieces of evidence within the reading

    • Definitions of terms

    • Personal response

  1. Using the key words come up with one subheading and then continue on as a class or have students continue as small groups or partners.

IV. Writing Technique- Basic Analytical Paragraph



Materials

Previous Reading Activity

Copies of collecting Evidence Handout

Copies of Analytical Paragraph frame



  1. Students will collect evidence from each section of the reading to help them answer the focus question

  2. Re-read the first section, help students to identify two supporting details that explain the sub heading. Write these in the Collecting Evidence handout.

  3. Repeat for the other subheadings.

  4. Use the evidence to complete the Analytical Paragraph frame.

  5. To help students analyze the evidence

  • Have students paraphrase evidence

  • Then explain how this helps to answer the focus question

  • Make “executive decision” changes as necessary

  • Talk through your own analysis on the first set of evidence

Early Buddhism in India


Korea
http://www.buddha101.com/images/mapearly.gif



Japan

China




India




1

http://www.buddha101.com/h_maps.htm



Along the Silk Road:
The Spread of Mahayana and Theravada Buddhism



China

Korea

Japan

India

2
mapspread

http://www.buddha101.com/h_maps.htm

The Spread of Buddhism into Japan


China

Korea

Japan

India

3
mapjapan
http://www.buddha101.com/h_maps.htm

- Possible Map Questions for Class Discussion -
Map 1

- What do you notice about the map?

- What direction are the lines going?
Map 2

- What do you notice about the map?

- What directions are the lines going?

- What countries are the blue lines going towards?


Map 3

- What do you notice about the map?

- Which type of Buddhism spread to Japan?

- From which countries did Buddhism spread to Japan?




http://aamdocents.org/aam/india/sculpture/b60s393buddhaseat.jpg



PRIMARY SOURCE A

Seated Buddha, approx. 300-500


Pakistan; perhaps Jamalgarhi, Peshawar valley, ancient region of Gandhara
The Avery Brundage Collection, Asian Art Museum, B60S393


TEACHER CONTENT SHEET A

Phantoms

Who was the Buddha? For people today, who is the Buddha? The answers we get from exhisiting texts and artworks, and from current practioners, suggest a view of Buddha as an idealized being who disseminates a spiritual message. The Buddha continues to be a bridge between the human world and spiritual world, both in his human form and in visual forms existing after the end of his human life. The sheer, variety in images of the Buddha reminds us that the relationships between the believer and the Buddha remain personalized and individual.


Collection Label

The Buddha's hands are held in a gesture of preaching known as, “turning the wheel of the doctrine.” “(A depiction of an actually wheel being turned is carved on the architectural element to your left.)

Beneath his low throne appears a seated princely figure flanked by kneeling devotees who may represent donors. Subsidiary scenes appear regularly on the bases of Gandharan Buddha sculptures. Those that are most similar to this example depict gods urging the Buddha-to-be to start his quest for enlightenment. According to various texts, the intervention of the gods may have occurred on two occasions: when the Buddha-to-be was awaiting his last rebirth and again just before he decided to renounce his princely life. On several image bases, pious donors appear in place of the gods.

From Asian Art Museum, aamdocents.org


b60s10+amidanyorai.jpg



PRIMARY SOURCE B

Seated Buddha Amitabha (Japanese: Amida),Japan. Heian period (794-1185)

Lacquer and gold on wood,

The Avery Brundage Collection, B60S10+

TEACHER CONTENT SHEET B

*Seated Buddha Amitabha (Japanese: Amida)
Japan
Heian period (794-1185)
Lacquer and gold on wood
The Avery Brundage Collection, B60S10+

Amida, lord of the Western Paradise, is seated in deep concentration with half-closed eyes and hands held in the gesture of meditation. During the eleventh and twelfth centuries, images like this were created in large numbers as a direct result of the popularity of Pure Land Buddhism in Japan. This teaching instructed believers about the horrors of Buddhist hell and celebrated the glories of the Western Paradise, which can be attained through meditation and recitation of Amida's name.

This Amida figure is made in a technique called "multiple blocks," which is described on the nearby panel entitled "Making of Buddhist Sculpture.

This 12th-century carved-wood figure is Amitabha, in Japanese, Amida. Loving giver of comfort and hope, Amida is the one of the most benevolent forms of the Buddha, who vowed to deliver the faithful to his pure land.

He sits cross-legged on a lotus pedestal, in deep concentration. His eyes are half closed, and his hands are in the gesture of meditation. Amida's simple monk's robe drapes in gentle folds over his left shoulder and his lower body and legs. The flowing curving lines keep the viewer's eye moving over the surface, even as the calm facial features and the symmetrical triangular composition convey a feeling of serenity and stability.

From Asian Art Museum aamdocents.org


Analyzing a Primary Source
Focus Question: ______________________________________________________________


1. Title of Primary Source (A):




2. Audience: (Who is intended audience?)

3. Place & Time: (Where and when was it published?)




4. Historical Context: (What was going on during this event or era/period?)



5. Description of Source: (What I see - images, people, objects, activities, action, words, phrases, facts.)


6. Meaning: (What do the objects, words, symbols, etc. mean?)


7. Message/Argument: (Inferences/conclusions about what the source says or insight it gives in helping you answer the focus question.)


Teacher Key



Analyzing a Primary Source
Focus Question: How did contact with Korea influence Japanese Religion?


6. Meaning: (What do the objects, words, symbols, etc. mean?)

The man is meditating because his eyes are closed and his legs are crossed.

His hands represent his teachings because he is making a wheel symbol.

The people could represent his followers because they are underneath him.



7. Message/Argument: (Inferences/conclusions about what the source says or insight it gives in helping you answer the focus question.)

This sculpture shows that mediating and teaching was important to Buddhists in India. It also shows that sculptures were made to encourage other people to become Buddhists.



5. Description of Source: (What I see - images, people, objects, activities, action, words, phrases, facts.)

A man sitting with his legs crossed.

He is wearing a robe and he has a bun on his head.

There are three people under him.

There is a piece of stone behind his head.

His hands look like they are making a wheel.



4. Historical Context: (What was going on during this event or era/period?)

Buddhism spread throughout Northern Asia and Southeast Asia.

Specifically, it spread to China and Korea from monks who traveled throughout Asia.

3. Place & Time: (Where and when was it produced?)

Approximately 300-500 C.E. in Peshawar Valley of what is now Pakistan



1. Title of Primary Source (A): Seated Buddha

2. Audience: (Who is intended audience?) Buddhists and people who might become Buddhist



Analyzing a Primary Source


7. Message/Argument: (Inferences/conclusions about what the source says or insight it gives in helping you answer the focus question.)

5. Description of Source: (What I see - images, people, objects, activities, action, words, phrases, facts.)

4. Historical Context: (What was going on during this event or era/period?)

3. Place & Time: (Where and when was it published?)

2. Audience: (Who is intended audience?)

1. Title of Primary Source (B):

6. Meaning: (What do the objects, words, symbols, etc. mean?)
Focus Question: _____________________________________________Analyzing a Primary Source


Teacher Key

5. Description of Source: (What I see - images, people, objects, activities, action, words, phrases, facts.)

A lotus flower with a man sitting on it.

A man with his legs crossed, wearing a robe with his hands in his lap.

The man has long earlobes, closed eyes and a dot on his forehead.



3. Place & Time: (Where and when was it produced?)

Heian period (794-1185) in Japan



1. Title of Primary Source (B): Seated Buddha Amitabha

7. Message/Argument: (Inferences/conclusions about what the source says or insight it gives in helping you answer the focus question.)

Because the Buddha is meditating I can infer that meditating in order to achieve enlightenment and sitting on lotus flowers were important to Buddhists in Japan.

Because the Buddha is sitting on a lotus flower I can infer Japanese Buddhists included aspects of Shinto that placed importance on beauty and nature.

6. Meaning: (What do the objects, words, symbols, etc. mean?)

The lotus flower is a common symbol in Buddhism which represents rising above the “mud of the world” to remain clean and beautiful.

The Buddha’s hands show that he is meditating.

4. Historical Context: (What was going on during this event or era/period?)

Mahayana Buddhism was introduced to Japan from Korea. Monks and scholars who traveled from Japan to Korea and China in order to study, returned and spread the beliefs and practices of the religion of Buddhism to the emperors and court of Japan. Eventually many people in Japan adopted Buddhism and blended it with their existing Shinto beliefs. This religion is based upon respect and awe for nature.



2. Audience: (Who is intended audience?)
Japanese Buddhists or people who might become Buddhist
Focus Question: How did contact with Korea influence Japanese Religion?

Writing about the Primary Sources

How did contact with Korea influence Japanese Religion?
__________________ shows that ___________________________

(name, title of Source A) ( Audience)

thought/did/had__________________________________________ (message regarding a person, place, event, idea)

_____________________________________________________


because ________________________________________________

(SPECIFIC EVIDENCE in primary source- quote, statistics, images, etc)

_____________________________________________________


_____________________________________________________
__________________ shows that ___________________________

(name, title of Source B) (Author, other people, the world)

thought/did/had__________________________________________ (message regarding a person, place, event, idea)

_____________________________________________________


because ________________________________________________

(SPECIFIC EVIDENCE in primary source- quote, statistics, images, etc)

_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
Taken together______________________ and _______________________

(Primary Source A) (Primary Source B)


show how Buddhism influenced Japanese religion because _________________
_____________________________________________________________


Teacher Key



Writing about the Primary Sources

How did contact with Korea influence Japanese Religion?

The Seated Buddha_ shows that __Buddhists in India_____________

(name, title of Source A) ( Audience)

thought that meditation and teaching were important to (message regarding a person, place, event, idea)

Buddhists in India. ______________________________________
because the Buddha is sitting in a meditation pose. Also, his hands are

(SPECIFIC EVIDENCE in primary source- quote, statistics, images, etc)

made into a wheel which a symbol for the teachings of the Buddha. In addition, his followers are placed on the statue under Buddha._____________________

(SPECIFIC EVIDENCE in primary source- quote, statistics, images, etc)
Seated Amitabha Buddha shows that _Buddhists in Japan

(name, title of Source B) (Audience)

thought that meditation and the lotus flower were important (message regarding a person, place, event, idea)

because the Amitabha Buddha is sitting in a meditation pose with his hands one on top of the other which also represents meditation. The Amitabha Buddha

(SPECIFIC EVIDENCE in primary source- quote, statistics, images, etc)



is sitting on top of a lotus flower which shows how Buddhism in Japan included aspects of Shinto.

Taken together The Seated Buddha and Seated Amitabha Buddha show how

(Primary Source A) (Primary Source B)

Buddhism influenced Japanese religion because both sculptures show how meditation is an important part of Buddhism in India and Buddhism in Japan. The Japanese sculpture also shows how the importance of nature and beauty combining Shintoism and Buddhism.

Focus Question: How did contact with Korea influence Japanese Religion?

Name:_______________________

Date:___________________

Directions:


  • Read the passage below through once.

  • Reread each section individually with your group.

  • With your partners the main idea of the passage to create a topic – this is your heading.

  • Highlight evidence from the section that supports the main idea/heading.

  • Annotate the highlighted evidence (annotations can be reactions, questions, connections, etc.)

  • When you are done with the whole reading, create a title for the entire passage.

Buddhist temples were another result of cultural diffusion. Buddhism began in India in the 500’s B.C.E. About 1,000 years later, it came to Japan from China by way of Korea.

Japan’s original religion was Shinto. This religion expresses the love and respect of the Japanese for nature. Its followers worship spirits called kami. Impressive natural objects are kami, such as wind, lighting, rivers, mountains, waterfalls, large trees and unusual stones. So are the emperor and other special people.

Instead of emphasizing a code of morality, Shinto stressed purifying whatever is unclean, such as dirt, wounds and disease. Touching the dead also makes one unclean. Most of all, however, Shintoists celebrate life and the beauty of nature.

In contrast, Buddhists see life as full of pain and suffering. The founder of Buddhism, Siddhartha Gautama taught that life is an endless cycle of birth, death and rebirth. To escape this painful cycle, one must follow a moral code called the Eightfold Path. Buddhism’s moral code emphasizes showing respect for others, acting rightly, and achieving wisdom through meditation. Following the path leads to enlightenment, or seeing the world as it really is. Those who achieve enlightenment can enter nirvana, a state of perfect peace.

By finding the path to enlightenment, Sidhartha became the Buddha, or “enlightened one.” As Buddhism spread through India, a new form arose, called Mahayana: that all people can reach nirvana. Its followers believe in boddhisativas, buddhas who can enter nirvana but choose instead to help others reach enlightenment. These godlike spirits live in different paradises. Worshippers pray to them in hopes of being reborn into one of those paradises themselves. It is this form of Buddhism that spread along trade routes to China. The influence of Chinese culture brought Buddhism to Korea.

Mahayana arrived in Japan in 552 when a Korean king sent the Japanese emperor a statue of the Buddha and a recommendation for the new religion. The statue arrived at the emperor’s court surrounded by chanting monks, books of prayer, gongs and banners. The emperor was not quite sure what to make of it.

After a fierce controversy, the emperor and his court adopted the new religion. They admired its wisdom and rituals, and they considered the Buddha a magical protector of families and the nation. Later rulers, such as Prince Shotoku, learned more about Buddhism through contact with China.

Buddhism did not replace Shinto. Instead, both religions thrived and even blended together. Buddhists built shrines to kami, and Shintoists enshrined bodhisattvas.

TCI History Alive , pg 222-223

Focus Question: How did contact with Korea influence Japanese Religion?




Teacher Key
Name:______________________

Date:___________________



Directions:

  • Read the passage below through once.

  • Reread each section individually with your group.

  • With your partners the main idea of the passage to create a topic – this is your heading.

  • Highlight evidence from the section that supports the main idea/heading.

  • Annotate the highlighted evidence (annotations can be reactions, questions, connections, etc.)

  • When you are done with the whole reading, create a title for the entire passage.



Buddhism in India and Japan



why did Buddhism leave India?
Buddhist temples were another result of cultural diffusion. Buddhism began in India in the 500’s B.C.E. About 1,000 years later, it came to Japan from China by way of Korea.


Japan’s Original Religion- Shintoism



nature, kami, purity = keys in Shintoism
Japan’s original religion was Shinto. This religion expresses the love and respect of the Japanese for nature. Its followers worship spirits called kami. Impressive natural objects are kami, such as wind, lightening, rivers, mountains, waterfalls, large trees and unusual stones. So are the emperor and other special people.

Instead of emphasizing a code of morality, Shinto stressed purifying whatever is unclean, such as dirt, wounds and disease. Touching the dead also makes one unclean. Most of all, however, Shintoists celebrate life and the beauty of nature.




Buddhism Begins in India



law

Leave painful life cycle w/ Eightfold path = Buddhism
In contrast, Buddhists see life as full of pain and suffering. The founder of Buddhism, Siddhartha Gautama taught that life is an endless cycle of birth, death and rebirth. To escape this painful cycle, one must follow a moral code called the Eightfold Path. Buddhism’s moral code emphasizes showing respect for others, acting rightly, and achieving wisdom through meditation. Following the path leads to enlightenment, or seeing the world as it really is. Those who achieve enlightenment can enter nirvana, a state of perfect peace.


Why? b/c he liked it so much?

why help, not nirvana?

Eightfold Path  enlightenment  nirvana
By finding the path to enlightenment, Sidhartha became the Buddha, or “enlightened one.” As Buddhism spread through India, a new form arose, called Mahayana: that all people can reach nirvana. Its followers believe in boddhisativas, buddhas who can enter nirvana but choose instead to help others reach enlightenment. These godlike spirits live in different paradises. Worshippers pray to them in hopes of being reborn into one of those paradises themselves. It is this form of Buddhism that spread along trade routes to China. The influence of Chinese culture brought Buddhism to Korea.


Buddhism Comes to Japan



disagreement
Mahayana arrived in Japan in 552 when a Korean king sent the Japanese emperor a statue of the Buddha and a recommendation for the new religion. The statue arrived at the emperor’s court surrounded by chanting monks, books of prayer, gongs and banners. The emperor was not quite sure what to make of it.


Buddhism  official religion of J b/c of emperor
After a fierce controversy, the emperor and his court adopted the new religion. They admired its wisdom and rituals, and they considered the Buddha a magical protector of families and the nation. Later rulers, such as Prince Shotoku, learned more about Buddhism through contact with China.

Buddhism did not replace Shinto. Instead, both religions thrived and even blended together. Buddhists built shrines to kami, and Shintoists enshrined bodhisattvas.


*Shintoism + Buddhism = Japanese Buddhism *
TCI History Alive , pg 222-223

Name_______________________________


Date:______________________
Buddhism in Japan

Identifying and Organizing Evidence
Focus Question: How did contact with Korea influence Japanese religion?


Main Idea Headings

From Text

Evidence from the Text

(at least two pieces of evidence)















TCI History Alive , pg 222-223

Teacher Key
Name_______________________________
Date:______________________
Buddhism in Japan

Identifying and Organizing Evidence
Focus Question: How did contact with Korea influence Japanese religion?


Main Idea Headings

From Text

Evidence from the Text

(at least two pieces of evidence)

Japan’s Original Religion- Shintoism



Japan’s original religion was Shinto. This religion expresses the love and respect of the Japanese for nature.
Shintoists celebrate life and nature.

Buddhism Begins in India




Buddhism emphasizes showing respect for others, enlightenment and nirvana.
It is this form (Mahayana) Buddhism that spread along trade routes to China. The influence of Chinese culture brought Buddhism to Korea.

Buddhism Comes to Japan




Mahayana arrived in Japan in 552 when a Korean king sent the Japanese emperor a statue of the Buddha and a recommendation for the new religion.
Buddhism did not replace Shinto. Instead, both religions thrived and even blended together.

TCI History Alive , pg 222-223
Buddhism in Japan

Basic Analytical Paragraph


Focus Question: How did contact with Korea influence Japanese Religion?
Thesis statement: As a result of Contact with Korea, Japanese Shinto beliefs were combined with Buddhism to create a unique form of Buddhism in Japan.
Evidence: ____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________



Specific Evidence: For example, _________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

Analysis: ____________________________________________________________________

Evidence: ____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________



Specific Evidence: For example, _________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

Analysis: ____________________________________________________________________

Evidence: ____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________



Specific Evidence: For example, _________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

Analysis: ____________________________________________________________________

Concluding statement: _________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

Teacher Key

Buddhism in Japan

Basic Analytical Paragraph
Focus Question: How did contact with Korea influence Japanese Religion?
Thesis statement: As a result of Contact with Korea, Japanese Shinto beliefs were combined with Buddhism to create a unique form of Buddhism in Japan.
Evidence:Japan’s original religion was Shinto. This religion expresses the love and respect of the Japanese for nature.”

Specific Evidence: For example, “Shintoists celebrate life and nature.”

Analysis: Before Buddhism arrived in Japan there was an existing religion, Shinto, which emphasized nature and beauty.
Evidence:Buddhism emphasizes showing respect for others, enlightenment and nirvana.”

Specific Evidence: For example, “It is this form (Mahayana) of Buddhism that spread along trade routes to China. The influence of Chinese culture brought Buddhism to Korea.”

Analysis: Buddhism spread to China and then Korea along trade routes. Like Korea, Japan was influenced by the more established civilization in China.
Evidence:Mahayana arrived in Japan in 552 when a Korean king sent the Japanese emperor a statue of the Buddha and a recommendation for the new religion.”

Specific Evidence: “Buddhism did not replace Shinto. Instead, both religions thrived and even blended together.”

Analysis: Buddhism arrived in Japan directly through contact with Korea. However, Shinto was not abandoned, instead it was integrated with Buddhism.
Concluding statement: In conclusion, Japanese Shinto beliefs were combined with new Buddhist beliefs from Korea, and a new form of Buddhism was created in Japan.



Medieval Japan in the Seventh Grade Curriculum Summer Institute



Lesson Application #2: Buddhism by Caitlin Everett



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