Art History Web Site Karen Lang



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Art History Web Site

Karen Lang (klang@usc.edu)

Megan O’Neil (moneil@usc.edu)
Basic information about department at very bottom of the page:

Mailing Address:

Department of Art History

Von KleinSmid Center—VKC 351

University of Southern California

Los Angeles, CA 90089-0047


Telephone: (213) 740-4552

Fax: (213) 740-8971


Email: arthist@college.usc.edu
Office Hours

Monday-Friday 8:30 am- 5:00 pm



Blurb about the Department (to be placed at the lower left on the homepage)

The Ph.D. program in Art History at USC draws its strength from a dynamic and productive faculty in the fields of American, European, Latin American, and Asian art. Studying objects in their complex physical, cultural, and intellectual contexts, our faculty is committed to a historically situated and theoretically nuanced approach to art history and visual culture. Faculty research interests include the institutional settings and politics of art; sexuality, gender, race, ethnicity, and national identity; the force field of architecture, sculpture and ritual; the viewer’s role in representation; art and language; and the historiography of art history. As a faculty we are committed to a sustained dialogue between art history and its traditions, novel areas of inquiry, and innovative approaches. Our program features strong ties to the USC-Huntington Early Modern Studies Institute, the USC-Getty Program in the History of Collecting and Display, the interdisciplinary initiative in Visual, Literary, and Material Culture at USC, and the USC Visual Studies Graduate Certificate.


Blurbs about Faculty (to be placed at the upper right on the homepage.) [We are submitting new pictures for the following faculty: Bleichmar, Lang, Lee, O’Neil, Yasin. All other faculty have book covers already on the website; please use these. For this section do not include Crow, Holloway, and Reynolds.]
Malcolm Baker

Professor and Chair of Art History

Eighteenth-Century Art and the History of Collecting

Director, USC-Getty Program in the History of Collecting and Display


Malcolm Baker has written widely on the history of sculpture - particularly in the eighteenth century - and the history of collecting and display. His most recent book is Figured in Marble: The Making and Viewing of Eighteenth-Century Sculpture, published by the J. Paul Getty Museum and the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Like his other work, this book draws on his experience as both an academic and a curator and reflects his interest in developing a methodology that combines an engagement with the materiality of images and objects and a more explicitly theoretical mode of interpretation.

Daniela Bleichmar

Assistant Professor, Early Modern Visual and Material Culture


Daniela Bleichmar is a cultural historian of early modern science, specializing in the history of the natural sciences in Europe and the Spanish Americas in the early modern period (ca. 1500–1800). She is currently working on a book provisionally entitled Painting as Exploration. Visual Culture and Colonial Botany in the Eighteenth-Century Spanish World, in which she discusses the status and uses of images in eighteenth century natural history; the importance of

visual material in training the expert eyes and skilled hands of naturalists; the role of print culture in establishing a common vocabulary of scientific illustration; the interaction among visual evidence, textual evidence, and material evidence; and the ways colonial naturalists and artists appropriated and transformed European models, producing hybrid, local representations.

centuries.

Selma Holo

Professor of Art History and Director, USC Fisher Gallery


Selma Holo is the Director of USC Fisher Gallery and a Professor in the USC College Department of Art History. Her books, Beyond the Prado: Museums and Identity in Post-Franco Spain (1999), and Oaxaca at the Crossroads; Managing Memory, Negotiating Change (2004) study museums as institutions—and their influence on the shaping of culture.

Eunice D. Howe

Professor, Early Modern: 15th and 16th Century Art and Architecture


A specialist in Italian Renaissance Art and Architecture, Eunice Howe’s research interests include gender and the built environment, travel literature, urbanism in Late Medieval and Early Renaissance Italy, and 15th century Roman painting. Her current book project, The Art and Architecture of Healing; the Hospital in Early Modern Italy, examines communal rituals and gender in the formation of hospital design.

Karen Lang

Associate Professor, Modern European Art

Karen Lang’s research focus is modern German art and aesthetic theory. Her book, Chaos and Cosmos: On the Image in Aesthetics and Art History (2006), examines the conceptual foundations of the discipline of the history of art. Where chaos is here understood as a jumble or aggregate of sensuous impressions confronting the artist or observer, cosmos refers to the rendering of perceptible and intellectual data into form and system. Addressing the interplay of chaos and cosmos in terms of history, art history, philosophy, and epistemology, her book traces shifts in point of view and the way these shifts change aesthetic objects into historical objects, and even objects of knowledge.


Sonya Lee

Assistant Professor, Chinese Art and Archaeology


Sonya Lee specializes in religious art and architecture of pre-modern China. Her research focuses on the material culture of medieval Chinese Buddhism from the 5th to 10th centuries, in particular cave temples along the ancient Silk Road. Currently, she is completing a book on pictorial imageries of the Buddha Sakyamuni entering nirvana, in which she reassesses iconography as an art historical methodology, as well as explores issues of representation and social memory in the transformation of the Buddha’s absence into various material regimes of presence and continuity.

Carolyn Malone

Associate Professor, Medieval Art and Archaeology


Carolyn Malone teaches Medieval art from 300 to 1300, but specializes in French Romanesque and English Gothic architecture and sculpture. Her book, Facade as Spectacle: Ritual and Ideology at Wells Cathedral (2004) interprets the Gothic façade of Wells as part of political discourse and liturgical innovation in England around 1220. Her current liturgical and historical research will appear in her forthcoming book, Saint-Bénigne de Dijon en l’an mil, totius Gallię basilicis mirabiliorem: Interprétation politique, liturgique et théologique.


Richard Meyer

Associate Professor, Modern and Contemporary Art


Professor Meyer specializes in twentieth-century American art, cultural studies, and the history of photography. He is particularly interested in how discourses of gender and sexuality have shaped modern art and criticism. His book, Outlaw Representation: Censorship and Homosexuality in Twentieth-Century American Art (2002) examines a series of historical episodes in which work by homosexual artists was suppressed or censored outright. It demonstrates how artists from Paul Cadmus in the 1930s to Holly Hughes in the 1990s responded to the threat of censorship by producing their own images of social and sexual outlawry.
Megan O’Neil

Assistant Professor, Arts of the Ancient Americas


Professor O’Neil focuses on the ancient arts and archaeology of Mesoamerica, particularly the Maya. Her forthcoming book studies the historical dimensions of Maya sculptures from the 5th through the 8th centuries C.E. in Mexico and Guatemala, exploring how the ancient Maya used monumental stone sculpture to create, reframe, and reshape historical narratives over time. Examining questions of audience, performance, and ritual, her book also focuses on the reuse and burial of whole and fragmented Maya sculptures as part of a discussion of ancient Maya interrelation with the material remains of their ancestors.

John Pollini

Professor, Classical Art and Archaeology Art


Trained in the methodologies of classical art and archaeology, ancient history, classical philology, epigraphy, and numismatics, John Pollini is committed to interdisciplinary teaching and research. His special scholarly interests include ancient religion, mythology, narratology, rhetoric, and propaganda. His most recent book, The de Nion Head: A Masterpiece of Archaic Greek Sculpture, appeared in 2003.

Anne Porter

Assistant Professor of Art History and Near Eastern Archaeology


Anne Porter’s primary focus is the archaeology of third and second millennia BCE Syria and for a decade she co-directed excavations in the Euphrates river valley at a site called Tell Banat. Her fieldwork has been directed towards understanding the nature of the first cities and states in this area. Her thematic interests arise from this research and may be summed up as an exploration of the different ways people build connections between themselves in order to create community. In the ancient Near East, things as seemingly diverse as burials, ritual, kinship tradition, story-telling and even city plans may be means of negotiating some of the many things that have the potential to separate us. Porter considers all these things in trying to reach an intimate understanding of ancient life.
.
Nancy J. Troy

Professor, Modern Art


Nancy J. Troy has recently embarked on a new book project that explores the circumstances in which Piet Mondrian's paintings and related works of the early 1940s were displayed, described, marketed, publicized, and otherwise circulated in the months and years that followed the artist's death in New York in 1944. The goal is to provide a comprehensive examination of the roles played by other artists, dealers, collectors, conservators, museum curators, and academic art historians in making, and remaking, Mondrian's oeuvre. Professor Troy has received a fellowship from the American Council of Learned

Societies and is on leave during Fall 2005 in order to work on this project.



Ann Marie Yasin

Assistant Professor, Roman and Late Roman Art and Architecture


A specialist in Roman and late antique art and architecture, Anne Marie Yasin’s current book project, Martyrium Revisited: Churches, Saints and Communities in Late Antiquity, examines how the increasing popularity of saint veneration affected the architectural space and social function of early Christian churches across the Mediterranean. It focuses on evidence from Italy, North Africa and the Greek East from the fourth through sixth centuries CE to investigate the impact of saints' cults on commemoration for the dead, expressions of social hierarchies, and the organization of sacred space.

In bold are the tabs that we’d like at the left side or top of the homepage; the indented headings are second and third tiers.


PEOPLE

Faculty

NOTE: EACH FACULTY MEMBER’S NAME SHOULD HAVE A LINK TO THE COLLEGE-GENERATED INDIVIDUAL FACULTY WEB-PAGE. Individual photographs are already on website except for the following new ones: Nancy Troy and Sonya Lee]


Malcolm Baker, Ph.D.

Chair and Professor, 18th Century European Art and the History of Collecting

Email: mcbaker@usc.edu

Office: VKC 351A

Phone: (213) 821-5229
Daniela Bleichmar, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Early Modern Visual and Material Culture, History of Collecting and Display, Spanish Empire/Colonial Latin American Art

Email: bleichma@college.usc.edu

Office: VKC 368

Phone: (213) 821-6384
Thomas Crow, Ph.D.

Professor, Modern European and American Art

Director, Getty Research Institute

Email: tcrow@getty.edu

Office: VKC 351

Phone: (213) 740-4552


Camara Holloway, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, American Art

Email: camaraho@usc.edu

Office: VKC 381A

Phone: (213) 821-0887
Selma Holo, Ph.D.

Professor, Museum Studies

Email: holo@usc.edu

Office: HAR 126

Phone: (213) 740-4565
Eunice D. Howe, Ph.D.

Professor, Early Modern: 15th and 16th Century Art and Architecture

Email: howe@usc.edu

Office: VKC 348

Phone: (213) 740-7353
Karen Lang, Ph.D. [please note that I do not want my middle initial!]

Associate Professor, Modern European Art

Email: klang@usc.edu

Office: VKC 351A

Phone: (213) 821-1376
Sonya Lee, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Chinese Art and Architecture

Email: sonyasle@usc.edu

Office: VKC 373C

Phone: (213) 821-2582
Carolyn M. Malone, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Medieval Art and Archaeology

Email: cmalone@usc.edu

Office: VKC 373D

Phone: (213) 740-4569
Richard Meyer, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Modern and Contemporary Art

Email: rmeyer@usc.edu

Office: VKC 381B

Phone: (213) 740-9571
Megan O'Neil, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Arts of the Ancient Americas

Email: moneil@usc.edu

Office: VKC 342

Phone: (213) 821-4131
John Pollini, Ph.D.

Professor, Classical Art and Archaeology

Email: pollini@usc.edu

Office: VKC 368A

Phone: (213) 740-4554
Anne Porter, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Near Eastern Archaeology

Email: amporter@usc.edu
Jonathan M. Reynolds, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Japanese Art and Architecture

Email: jreynold@usc.edu

Office: VKC 351B

Phone: (213) 821-5228
Nancy J. Troy, Ph.D.

Professor, Modern Art

Email: ntroy@usc.edu

Office: VKC 349

Phone: (213) 740-4556
Ann Marie Yasin, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Roman and Late Roman Art and Architecture

Email: yasin@usc.edu

Office: THH 256J

Phone: (213) 740-3687

Associated Faculty


John E. Bowlt, Ph.D.

Professor, Slavic Studies

Email: bowlt@usc.edu
Leo Braudy, Ph.D.

Professor, English

Email: braudy@usc.edu
Bryan Burns, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Classics

Email: bburns@usc.edu
Diane Ghirardo, Ph.D.

Professor, Architecture

Email: trabalzi@usc.edu

Adjunct Faculty


Thomas Kren, Ph.D.

Curator of Manuscripts, The J. Paul Getty Museum

Email: tkren@getty.edu
Jerry Podany, M.F.A.

Conservator of Antiquities, The J. Paul Getty Museum

Email: jpodany@getty.edu
Part-Time Lecturers (Fall 2006)
Gregory Harwell, Ph.D.

Email: gharwell@usc.edu

Office: VKC 381A

Website: http://www.gregoryharwell.com


Miya Lippit, Ph.D.

Email: mlippit@adelphia.net

Office: VKC 373A

Phone: (310) 440-7592


Michael Schreyach, Ph.D.

Email: schreyac@usc.edu

Office: VKC 381A


Staff (names and contact info.)
Department Staff
Adrienne Capirchio, M.S. Ed.

Academic Advisor

Phone: (213) 740-4552

Email: azc@usc.edu


Imre S. Meszaros

Administrative Services Manager

Phone: (213) 740-9508

Email: meszaros@college.usc.edu


Laudrell N. Tilmon

Administrative Assistant

Phone: (213) 821-5230

Email: tilmon@college.usc.edu


Graduate Students (list of names and field of specialization at top of page; click on

name to go to biography and photograph at the bottom of page. All photographs already on website except for the following new one: Hillary Brown).


Current Graduate Students
If you would like to contact one of the graduate students in the Department, please send an email to arthist@usc.edu and your message will be forwarded to the appropriate individual. Students who have attained "All But Dissertation" status are designated as ABD.
Kristin Arioli (ABD)

Renaissance and Early Modern Italian Art History


Priyanka Basu

Modernist Criticism and the Historiography of Art History


Cathrine Besancon

Medieval Art, with a concentration on the sociopolitical aspects of Romanesque art


Courtney Biggs

Eighteenth-century French Art


Hillary E. Brown

Eighteenth-century British and French Sculpture


Alexandra Castillo-Kesper

Colonial Spanish and Modern Latin American Art


Kathleen Chapman

Nineteenth- and Twentieth-century German art, literature, and popular culture


Hyun-jung Cho

Postwar Japanese Visual Culture


Nick Cipolla

Classical Art, primarily of Rome


Jason Goldman

Twentieth-century Art and Visual Culture in the United States


Sarah Goodrum

Modern European Art


Kate Heckmann

Early Modern Italian Visual Culture


Karin Higa

Twentieth-Century American Art


Jason Hill

Contemporary Art


Sarah Hollenberg

Contemporary Art


Katya Kudriavtseva

Early Twentieth-century European and Slavic Art


Anca Lasc

Nineteenth-century European Art

Aleca LeBlanc

Modern Art, with a focus on Latin America


Rachel Middleman

Modern and Contemporary Art and Film


Jennifer Miller

Modern American Art


Leta Ming

Modern and Contemporary Art and Cultural Theory


Virginia Moon

Korean Art History


Aram Moshayedi

Contemporary Art, Cinema, and Museums


Linda Nolan (ABD)

Early Modern Italian Sculpture and Classical Roman Sculpture


Younjung Oh

Contemporary art, specifically Art and Visual Culture of East Asia


Thomas O'Leary (ABD)

Contemporary Japanese Media Culture

Kelli Olgren-Leblond (ABD)

Nineteenth- and Twentieth Century German Art and Architecture


Arianna Opsvig

Italian Renaissance, with a focus on Italian collections of New World objects


Alejandra Riguero

Nineteenth and early Twentieth-century British Art and Architecture


Suzy Royal (ABD)

Modern German Art


Stefanie Snider

Twentieth-century Art and Visual Culture


Virginia Solomon

Contemporary Art, particularly photography and video


Erin Sullivan

Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century German Art


Kristine Tanton

Medieval Art and Architecture


Linda Theung

Contemporary Art


Roger Von Dippe (ABD)

Roman Art


Amy Von Lintel

Nineteenth-century Visual Culture


Maria Webster

Modern Art


Candace Weddle

Late Antique and Early Medieval Material Culture


Sandra Zalman

Modern Art


Arsineh Zargarian

British Art


[NOTE: PICTURES SHOULD BE BEFORE EACH OF THESE BIOS]
Kristin Arioli (ABD)

Kristin is a final-year PhD student, specializing in Renaissance and Early Modern Italian art history. Her dissertation, "Cardinal Raffaele Riario and the Politics of Cultural Patronage in Renaissance Rome, 1477-1521," explores the dynamic relationship between artistic production and politics during the Renaissance through the consideration of the cardinal's sponsorship of cultural projects in and around Rome. After completing her Qualifying Examinations in the summer 2002, she conducted two years of research in Rome with the assistance of a Samuel H. Kress Foundation Travel Fellowship, two USC Department of Art History Dissertation Research Fellowships, and a Getty Memorial Scholarship for Summer Research Abroad. She has also worked as a research assistant for both the Curatorial Department and the Scholars Program of the Getty Research Institute.


Priyanka Basu

Priyanka is in her fifth year in the PhD program, where she is studying the modern period, focusing on the history of art history. She previously received an MA in art theory and criticism. Last year, she was a Research Assistant at the Getty Research Institute Scholars Program and Project for the Study of Collecting and Provenance. Priyanka presented a paper on Annette Michelson's film criticism at the 2005 USC Graduate Student Symposium. In summer 2005, she took an intensive German language course at the Humboldt Universitaet in Berlin. She is currently preparing her dissertation proposal on art history's demarcation of its boundaries and relationships to other disciplines in the late nineteenth century and early twentieth centuries in Germany and getting ready to take her candidacy exams.


Cathrine Besancon

Cathrine is a second-year PhD student who graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from UCLA with a BA in Art History and a minor in Classics. Her primary focus is medieval art, with a concentration on the sociopolitical aspects of Romanesque art. To further her language skills, she attended the Sorbonne Cours de Civilisation de Francais, a six week intensive French language program. In 2004, she interned at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. For her study at USC, she was awarded the Provost Fellowship. 


Courtney Biggs

Courtney is a third-year PhD student specializing in eighteenth-century French art. Her most recent research has been on early modern travel guides, and collecting culture surrounding the engraved gem in the eighteenth-century France and Italy. For the upcoming year, Courtney will be working as a research assistant at the Getty Research Institute. She held the seat of Art History Department Senator on the USC Graduate and Professional Student Senate during the 2005-2006 academic year, as well as serving on the committee for the Art History Graduate Student Symposium and the GPSS Graduate Programming Committee. Since arriving at USC, Courtney has been a teaching assistant for the classes Asian Art: From Antiquity to 1300, Foundations of Western Art, Art and Society: Renaissance to Modern, and Modern Art III: 1940 to the Present. She holds a BA from Vassar College in Art History and Economics, and has worked at art museums such as Dia:Beacon, the Whitney Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Hillary E. Brown (ABD)

Now in her fourth year in the department, Hillary has recently begun working on her dissertation on child bust portraiture in eighteenth-century England and France. She is a recipient of the 2004/2005 Early Modern Studies Institute Fellowship, and in the summer of 2005 she participated in the Mellon seminar on "Sensibility/Senisibilte in Eighteenth-Century England and France." Before coming to U.S.C., Hillary received her B.A. from Middlebury College and her M.A. from Columbia University, and she worked as a collections cataloguer for the Department of Special Collections at the Getty Research Institute. For the 2007-2008 academic year, she plans on conducting research on her dissertation in France and England.


Alexandra Castillo-Kesper

Entering her first year of the PhD program at USC, Alex graduated magna cum laude with a BA in Art History and a minor in Spanish from Middlebury College in Vermont. Earning highest honors for her thesis, La Malinche: The Iconography of the Mexican Eve, Alex is interested in Colonial Spanish and Modern Latin American Art. For her academic semester abroad, Alex studied art history in Madrid, where she received instruction in museums such as the Prado, Museo Thyssen-Bornemisva and La Reina Sofia. She worked as a Museum Assistant at the Middlebury College Art Museum and as an intern for Sotheby's International auction house. In addition to her current interest in the role of gender, ethnic and cultural identity, Alex plans to focus on social and political movements regarding the creation and reception of art in Latin America.


Kathleen Chapman

Kathleen is a third-year PhD student interested in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century German art, literature, and popular culture. She has served as a curatorial intern at the Rifkind Center for German Expressionist Studies at the L.A. County Museum of Art, worked as a research database editor for the Bibliography for the History of Art, and catalogued for the Electronic Cataloging Initiative at the Museum of the American West in Los Angeles. In Spring 2005, she presented a paper at the conference "Collage as Cultural Practice" at University of Iowa.


Hyun-jung Cho

Hyun-jung is beginning her fourth year in the PhD program, where she is studying postwar Japanese visual culture. In 2000, Hyun-jung graduated with a BA in archaeology and art history from Seoul National University, where she also pursued graduate coursework. In Summer 2005, she presented a paper on Dan Graham's photographic works at the Visualising the City conference in Manchester, England. This summer, she was awarded a Nikado Fellowship from EALC for her Japanese language study and she attended an intensive language course in Tokyo. In Fall 2006, she presented a paper on Metabolism architecture in Seoul, Korea, and this paper will be published in the Journal of Art History and Visual Culture in the coming year. This year, Hyun-jung is preparing for her dissertation proposal about the 1970 Osaka World's Fair.

Nick Cipolla

Nick is beginning his fifth year in the Ph.D. program. He entered the program with a BA in Art History and Classical Civilization from Yale University and received his MPhil in Classics at Cambridge, England. His current work is focused in the realm of Classical Art, primarily the art of Rome. He has worked extensively on the portraiture of Livia, Maenad imagery, and on the concept of the child in Roman Art. Other interests include the use of technology in the study of archaeology, and he has presented papers at the "2002 Acadia Architectural Conference: Thresholds Between Physical and Virtual," the proceedings of which were subsequently published; at the 105th Annual Archaeological Institute of America Conference in January 2004 with a paper entitled "Problematics of Making Ambiguity Explicit in Virtual econstructions: a case study of the Mausoleum of Augustus"; at Stanford University's conference entitled, "SEEING THE PAST: Building knowledge of the past and present through acts of seeing" in February 2005; and at a conference at the University of London in Fall 2005 devoted to the use of Computers in the History of Art.


Jason Goldman

Jason studies twentieth-century American art, the history of photography, and matters of gender, race, and sexuality in visual culture. In summer 2006, Jason was the recipient of a USC Center for Feminist Research Travel Grant, which allowed him to visit the photography collection of the Kinsey Institute at Indiana University. His article on the nineteenth-century photographer Wilhelm von Gloeden appeared in the February 2006 issue of GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies. Jason participated in two panels at the 2006 conference of the College Art Association, giving papers on von Gloeden and the archive of American artist Robert Smithson. He has also given papers at Cornell University and UCLA. In 2008 he will co-chair, with Erica Rand, the CAA panel Queer Love Boat? The Politics of Inclusion in Visual Culture. Jason co-coordinated the 2005 Expanding the Visual Field graduate student symposium and received his MA from USC in 2005.


Sarah Goodrum

This is Sarah's first year in the PhD program at USC. She graduated from Vassar College with a BA in English in 1998, and went on to have a career in trade and academic publishing before pursuing her MA in Art History at Vanderbilt University. Her MA thesis, titled "Photograph, Painting, Persona: Dialectics of Presence in the Work of Egon Schiele," treats the relationship between photographic images of the artist and his own work. While at USC, she plans to continue pursuing her interests in Modern European Art, in particular early twentieth century German and Austrian aesthetics, photography, and the afterlife of art objects.


Kate Heckmann

Kate is beginning her fourth year in the Ph.D program and is a recipient of the USC-Huntington Early Modern Studies Institute Fellowship for 2006-07. Her primary field is early modern Italian visual culture. Last spring, she presented a paper on Italian woodworking at UNC-Chapel Hill’s Medieval and Renaissance graduate student symposium. Kate’s recent work has addressed printed cookbooks and culinary treatises from Italy in the 16th and 17th centuries, connections between art and science at the Medici court through the botanical works of Giovanna Garzoni, and late Renaissance Venetian banquet scenes. This year, she will prepare a dissertation proposal exploring the intersections between art and culinary culture in Renaissance Italy, through high art, print material, and material culture.


Karin Higa

Karin Higa earned a BA from Columbia University and an MA from UCLA, both in art history. As the senior curator of art at the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles, she curated a number of exhibitions including, “George Nakashima: Nature, Form & Spirit,” “Living in Color: The Art of Hideo Date,” “Bruce and Norman Yonemoto: Memory, Matter and Modern Romance,” and “The View from Within: Japanese American Art from the Internment Camps, 1942-1945.” She was a cocurator of “One Way or Another: Asian American Art Now,” in collaboration with the Asia Society, New York, which travels to Houston, Berkeley, and Los Angeles. She has taught at Mills College, UC Irvine, and Otis College of Art and Design, and has lectured extensively on Asian American and contemporary art. Publications include texts on artists Ruth Asawa (De Young Museum, 2006), Sam Durant (Wrong Gallery, 2004) and Lincoln Tobier (Les Labortoires d’Aubervilliers, 2003) and contributions to the books Only Skin Deep (Abrams, 2003) and Parallels and Intersections: A Remarkable History of Women Artists in California, 1950-2000 (University of California Press, 2002.) She is a USC College Doctoral Fellow.


Jason Hill

Jason Hill enters his third year with the program after completing his Master's in art history at Tufts University. This past year Jason devoted his attention largely to the work of Ad Reinhardt and Weegee as part of a larger project concerning those artworks conceived with their own mass reproduction in mind. Extracurricularly, Jason recently cochaired the department's annual graduate student symposium and was awarded an Ailsa Mellon Bruce Predoctoral Fellowship for Historians of American Art to Travel Abroad from the Center for the Advanced Study of the Visual Arts for 2006-07. This year Jason will begin preparation for his dissertation, which will explore the visual and cultural logic of the 1940s New York newspaper, PM Daily.


Sarah Hollenberg

Sarah is in her second year of the PhD program at USC. She received her MA in art history at York University in Toronto, where her research focused on the relationship between regional popular culture and Conceptual art in Eastern Canada in the 1960s and 1970s. Prior to entering graduate studies, Sarah worked as an independent art critic and curator. She has published reviews and feature articles in various periodicals, including C International Contemporary Art, Sculpture, The Brooklyn Rail and Bordercrossings, and has contributed critical essays to exhibition catalogues published by museums and public galleries in Ontario, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Newfoundland. This summer Sarah was visiting lecturer in the Department of Historical and Critical Studies at NSCAD University.


Katya Kudriavtseva (ABD)

Katya studies early twentieth-century European and Slavic art and is now in her fifth year in the PhD program. She holds an MA in art history from the University of Oklahoma. With the help of a Borchard Fellowship, she spent the 2004-2005 academic year in Russia doing research for her dissertation, which will focus on Malevich and Suprematism. This year, Katya received a College Strategic Themes Research Assistantship and will be working with Professor Troy, researching the historiography of the Russian avant-garde and marketing strategies of galleries and dealers.


Anca Lasc

Anca is a third-year student in the Ph.D. program, where she entered with a B.A. in History and Theory of Art and Literature from International University Bremen, Germany. Before joining USC, Anca held several intern positions with institutions such as Brukenthal Museum, Romania, Neues Museum Weserburg, Germany, and Henry Moore Institute, UK. While at USC, Anca served as a teaching assistant for both halves of the Western art survey. She interned at USC Fisher Gallery in the past academic year and earned her M.A. degree in May 2006. Anca spent the summer of 2006 in Paris doing research with the support of a Getty Memorial Scholarship for Summer Research Abroad. In the 2006-2007 academic year she is working as a Research Assistant in the Curatorial Department at the Getty Research Institute. Anca’s work addresses techniques of display and the viewing of art in public spaces throughout nineteenth-century France.


Aleca LeBlanc

Aleca is entering her third year in the PhD program, where she is studying modern art with a focus on Latin America. Her dissertation will explore the emergence of a constructivist formal language in Brazil in the 1950s as part of a highly productive visual culture. She spent the past two summers in Rio de Janeiro studying Portuguese and conducting preliminary dissertation research with the assistance of a Getty Memorial Scholarship and a Foreign Language Area Studies fellowship. Prior to coming to USC, Aleca was a curatorial assistant in the Modern and Contemporary Art Department at the LA County Museum of Art, where she worked on the exhibition Beyond Geometry; Experiments in Form, 1940s-70s. She received her MA in art history from Columbia University and her BA from the University of California, Santa Barbara. She contributes ongoing art criticism to Art Nexus.


Rachel Middleman

Rachel is a third-year student in the PhD program at USC, studying modern and contemporary art and film. Her interview with contemporary American artist Glenn Ligon, “History with a Small ‘H’: A Conversation with Glenn Ligon,” was recently published in the journal GLQ by Duke University Press. Last year she served as co-chair for the 2006 USC Graduate Student Symposium "Space Exploration: Within and Beyond the Image." Before coming to USC, she received her BA in Philosophy from the University of California Santa Cruz and her MA in Modern Art History, Theory and Criticism from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago where she wrote her master's thesis on the work of Sophie Calle.


Jennifer Miller

Jennifer is entering her third year in the PhD program. She is the recipient of a College Strategic Theme Research Assistantship at USC College of Letters, Arts, and Sciences for both the 2004-05 and 2005-06 academic years. She will continue to serve as research assistant for the Literary, Visual, and Material Culture Initiative under the advisement of Professor Richard Meyer. In the summer of 2005, she conducted preliminary dissertation research on the history of the representation of burlesque theater in American art and visual culture with the aid of a Luce Foundation Fellowship. Jennifer received her BA in Art History and English from the College of William and Mary, and she completed her Master's in Museum Studies at USC in 2003. In the spring of 2003, she co-curated "Fashion and Transgression" for the USC Fisher Gallery and published an essay entitled "Glamour: Fashion and Illusion" for the accompanying catalogue. Jennifer has also written curriculum for the Ancient World Mobile, Maya Mobile, and the Evenings for Educators Program at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.


Leta Ming

A third-year PhD student, Leta specializes in modern and contemporary art and cultural theory. She received a BA in cultural anthropology from Yale University and an MA in art history from Hunter College. Her Master's thesis focused on site-specific interventionist public art of the early 1970s. Prior to entering the PhD program, she was a Curatorial Fellow in the Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Program in New York. In this capacity, she co-curated Social Capital: Forms of Interaction, an exhibition of recent art that examined both discordant and harmonious forms of social interaction. Her current research projects include the intersection of race and gender in the formation of subjects, and an exploration of humor in Bay Area performance art of the 1970s.


Virginia Moon

Virginia earned a BA in art history from Yale University and an MA in East Asian Studies at Harvard. Her focus is in Korean art history and her interests include the National Treasure system of Korea and modern Korean art. She has presented papers on these topics at the Royal Asiatic Society in Korea, the Fulbright Commission in Korea, Harvard University, Berkeley, and USC. Funded by Fulbright and Blakemore Foundation Fellowships, Virginia has studied Korean art history at Seoul National University. At USC, she has been awarded the College Dean's Award, FLAS (Foreign Languages and Area Studies) Fellowships, and most recently, the Korea Foundation Fellowship.

Aram Moshayedi

Aram holds a BA in Art History/Theory/Criticism from the University of California, San Diego where he was awarded Highest Honors Distinction for his thesis centering on the photo-document in early works by the Viennese Actionists and post-war medical culture. Now in his second year of graduate study at USC, Aram has most recently examined the formation of UNESCO and its mobilizations of the museum, the cinema, and the art-reproduction under the auspices of world peace. In the coming year he hopes to further his converging interests in institutional appropriations of art and culture and parallel histories of the museum and the cinema.


Linda Nolan (ABD)

Linda Ann Nolan’s primary specialization is Early Modern Italian sculpture and secondary specialization is Classical Roman sculpture. Her research interests include art restoration, viewer reception, history of collections, and early modern Italian prints and guidebooks. She has presented at a number of graduate symposia and professional conferences, including those held at Bryn Mawr College, Harvard University and by the Archaeological Institute of America. Linda participated in the American Academy in Rome’s Summer Archaeology program excavating in the Roman Forum, and prior to that excavated at Pompeii with the University of Rome. Past internships include ones with art conservation centers in Chicago and Lugano, Switzerland. Linda held positions for several years in the Getty Research Institute’s Scholars Program and in the Museum Education Department at the J. Paul Getty Museum. During the 2005-2006 academic year, Linda received the Borchard Foundation Dissertation Research fellowship. During the 2006-2008 academic years, Linda will be in residence at the Bibliotheca Hertziana in Rome conducting research for her dissertation, “Tactile Reception of Sculpture in Early Modern Rome,” with the assistance of a Samuel H. Kress Foundation Fellowship at Foreign Institutions. In January 2007, Linda will present a paper, “Face the Truth: the Bocca della Verità,” at the Archaeological Institute of America’s Annual Conference.


Younjung Oh

Younjung is in her third year of the PhD program. She received her BA in Art History from Seoul National University and worked for an art magazine in Seoul. Her primary area of interest is in modern and contemporary art and visual culture of East Asia. Her dissertation project will examine urban visual culture in Japan during the early twentieth century. The subject of department store as the important medium for visualization of Japanese modernization will be her main topic. In 2005, Younjung has been awarded an ACE Japanese studies fellowship from East Asian Studies Center at USC. She spent the summer of 2006 in Tokyo, doing research with the assistance of an Inamoto Fellowship, USC East Asian Language and Culture.


Thomas O'Leary (ABD)

Tom is in his fifth year at the department and focuses on contemporary Japanese media culture. He is specifically interested in the ways photography, film, and, more recently, "new media" has been used to explore and critique power relationships. Tom has given papers on the nature of perfomativity and gender identification at the annual USC Graduate Student Symposium, had a paper accepted to the UCLA/USC Thinking Gender conference on the place of the cyborg and feminist criticism in Japanese visual culture and has given lectures on modernism, postmodernism and the problem of tradition in Japanese art at both Cal State Fullerton and USC. He has also taught as the graduate student instructor for the Asian Art survey course under Professor Insoo Cho. Currently, he is laying the groundwork for his dissertation which will deal with defining a Japanese visual identity through comparisons of several different groups of photographers in the post-occupation period of Japan, considering these views from the point of view of gender and the politicization of vision. He has completed a year-long course at the Inter-University Center for Japanese Language Studies and has been the recipient of the All-University Pre-Doctoral Diversity Fellowship, The US Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship, the Friends of Art History Fellowship, Getty Memorial Scholarship, and the Borchard Dissertation Fellowship, and has spent the last year in Tokyo conducting research for his dissertation. He passed his Qualifying Examinations in August 2004.


Kelli Olgren-Leblond (ABD)

Kelli entered the PhD program in 2000 with a focus on German art and architecture in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. She is currently writing her dissertation, "Reading Expressionist Architecture: The German Avant-Garde and 'Paper Architecture,' 1914-1924," and has been awarded a Final Year Dissertation Fellowship from the College of Letters, Arts and Sciences for the 2005-2006 academic year. Over the course of her studies she has been a University Merit Fellow in the College of Letters, Arts and Sciences and a Borchard Foundation Dissertation Research Fellow, and has received travel grants from both the Department of Art History and the U.S. National Committee for the History of Art. In 2004 her dissertation project was awarded a Citation of Special Recognition from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts as part of their annual Carter Manny Award competition. From 2001-2002 Kelli also worked as a research assistant in the Collection Development department of the Getty Research Institute. She intends to defend her dissertation in Spring 2006.


Arianna Opsvig

Arianna is a second year PhD student at USC and specializes in the Italian Renaissance with a focus on Italian collections of New World objects. Her most recent research has focused on the European reaction to, and assimilation of, indigenous featherwork in the sixteenth century. This year she is cochair of the Graduate Student Symposium: "A Useful Thing? Shifting Values, Uses & Interpretations of Art". She received her BA from Wellesley College with a double major in art history and economics, and worked in the field of economics before coming to USC.


Alejandra Riguero

Alex Riguero is a second year student focusing on nineteenth and early twentieth century British art and architecture. Her work focuses on the intellectual history of British artistic production and the influence of antiquity and empire on the discourses of art. Alex received her BA from Yale University in 2005.


Suzy Royal (ABD)

Suzy holds a Masters degree from the Courtauld Institute in London, where she focused on the graphic art of the early German Expressionists. In 2004-2005 she received a DAAD fellowship from the German government to conduct research for her dissertation in Berlin. The past year (2005-2006) she has been writing her dissertation with a USC Borchard Fellowship. She will complete and defend her dissertation at the end of the fall semester 2006. Her dissertation is titled “Graphic Art in Weimar Berlin: The Case of Jeanne Mammen" and looks at the construction and myth of the New Woman through the fashion illustrations and watercolors of Neue Sachlichkeit artist, Jeanne Mammen.


Stefanie Snider

Stefanie is very happily in her fourth year of the PhD program at USC. She received her MA in art history from Tufts University in 2003. Her interests are in twentieth-century art and visual culture with a focus on feminist, gender, and queer issues, which she will develop into a dissertation proposal this year. She recently was named a 2005-2006 Ailsa Mellon Bruce Predoctoral Travel Fellow for Travel Abroad for Historians of American Art by the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. She used her fellowship award to travel through Europe in the summer of 2005.


Virginia Solomon

Virginia Solomon is a second year PhD student, planning to major in contemporary American art. Her interests include photography, media and popular culture, queer theory, feminism, gender, and identity. Her current research interests involve the use of mass media forms in art to navigate/mediate subcultural identity, with a focus on queer subcultures. Past research topics include Mapplethorpe, Sofonisba Anguissola, the subject positioning of punk in the V&A Vivienne Westwood show, and General Idea. Virginia graduated from Stanford University in the winter of 2004, and after graduation worked as a gallery assistant and studio manager in San Francisco.


Erin Sullivan

Erin is entering her first year in the PhD program at USC. She received her M.A. in art history from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in the spring of 2006. There she focused on 19th and 20th century European art and architecture and was introduced to the print and print culture. At USC, she will cultivate her interests in the art of Germany in the late 19th and 20th centuries, particularly in printmaking, print publishing, and print culture in the Weimar period. She has worked at museums including the Mead Art Museum at Amherst College, the Department of Prints Drawings and Photographs at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, the Cunningham Center for Prints, Drawings and Photographs at the Smith College Art Museum and at the Missoula Art Museum. This past summer, she was able to attend an intensive language course at the Freie Universitaet in Berlin with a DAAD scholarship. She received her B.A. in history with a minor in art history from the University of Montana in 2002.


Kristine Tanton

Kristine is entering her second year in the PhD program at USC. Her area of focus is medieval art and architecture. Kristine presented a paper on the pavement labyrinth of Amiens Cathedral at the 2006 USC Graduate Student Symposium. She spent the summer of 2006 at the Centre for Medieval Studies at the University of Toronto, studying Medieval Latin. Kristine received her BFA from Parsons School of Design and worked as an art director in publishing and multimedia before deciding to pursue a PhD in art history.


Linda Theung

Linda is a first-year PhD student in the program. She holds a BA in Art History and a minor in Computer Science from the University of California at Riverside. As an undergraduate, Linda's studies focused on contemporary art, identity politics, and feminism. These interests extended to her museum experience as a Research Assistant for WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution, an international survey of feminist art from 1965 through 1980 that opens in March 2007 at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles. At USC, Linda hopes to map out the relationship between science, technology, and marginal practices in modern and contemporary art by looking at the historiography of new media.


Roger Von Dippe (ABD)

Roger studies Roman art and is entering his sixth year in the PhD program. He is particularly interested in representations of narrative in Roman painting, the sublime, and art as incorporated into the domestic space of Roman villas. He took his Qualifying Examinations in Fall 2003.


Amy Von Lintel

Amy is beginning her third year of the PhD program. She intends to focus her dissertation research on the visual culture of the nineteenth century, and specifically the issues of illustration and visual pedagogy as they play out in early illustrated art history survey texts. She graduated Phi Beta Kappa with her BA in art history and French from the University of Kansas in 2001 and her MA from Southern Methodist University in 2003. For the 2005-2006 academic year, she received a College Strategic Themes Research Assistantship, through which she worked with Professor Malcolm Baker at the Getty Research Institute on the theme of "Literary, Visual, and Material Culture" in illustrated books. She also served as the Graduate Student Representative for the Art History Department, and sat on the Dean’s Council for the USC College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.


Maria Webster (ABD)

This fall Maria will be entering her fifth year in the PhD program. She holds a BA in Art History from Smith College and an MA in Art History from USC. Maria has recently completed her coursework for the PhD and preparations for her thesis, "Critical Fictions. Writing a Feminist Art History: The Case of Madame Yevonde." Maria's interests center on portrait photography in the modern period, historiography, and their intersection with feminist and gender studies.


Candace Weddle

Candace Weddle is in her fourth year of the PhD program. She entered with a BA in Classics from Baylor University and an MA in Art History from Tulane University. Her dissertation research will be focused on Late Antique and Early Medieval material culture, specifically on the interplay between textual and archaeological evidence for Early Christian attitudes concerning imagery. In 2005 she participated in the American Academy in Rome Summer Archaeology Program, excavating at the Late Roman/Byzantine site of Classe Harbor near Ravenna. In 2006 she was part of a team excavating a Neolithic habitation site of the Petresti culture in the Transylvanian region of Romania. Her publications include “Damnatio, Indignatio, and the Deaths of the Persecuting Emperors: Influences on Early Christian Writers,” which appeared in the proceedings of the 2006 WAPACC Constructions of Death, Mourning, and Memory Conference and an upcoming article, “Significant Structures: Reading Bruegel’s Architecture,” which will be published online by the University of Iowa Graduate Art History Society in the spring of 2007. She also presented research on Hildegard of Bingen and Herrad of Hohenbourg at the 2006 Princeton Art and Archaeology Graduate Student Conference. Candace was named 2006 USC Outstanding Teaching Assistant, and currently serves on the Provost’s Graduate Student Advisory Committee.


Sandra Zalman (ABD)

Sandra earned a BA from UC Berkeley and an MA from USC. Her dissertation explores Surrealism's fluctuating position within avant-garde modern art and how its status as both high and low intersects with decisive disciplinary debates, mediated by extra-artistic factors including the public and the market. Last semester, she traveled to New York, Washington D.C. and Florida to conduct her research for her dissertation. This summer, she will go to Spain with the help of a Del Amo research grant. She has presented papers at UC Berkeley, UCLA, Yale University, Florida State University, and USC.


Arsineh Zargarian

Arsineh is entering her first year in the PhD program at USC after having received an MA in Humanities and Social Thought at New York University. In her master’s thesis, Country Views: Enclosure in the Landscapes of Thomas Gainsborough, she argued that features of enclosure sustain both tropes of the bucolic as well as themes of agricultural capitalism in the artist’s landscapes. She is a Borchard Foundation Fellow in the History of Collecting and Display at USC and will continue to focus her research on British art. In June 2004, she graduated from the University of California, Irvine with the Humanities Scholastic Merit Award. She received her BA in English with minors in Art History and Russian Studies. Last May, she returned to UCI to give a presentation at a conference hosted by the Critical Theory Emphasis.



Alumni (page with text and names of alumni in bold)
Alumni
Recent PhDs
Gamble Madsen completed and defended her dissertation, "Psalm 109 and the Medieval Mind: Visions of the Godhead with Special Emphasis on the Commentary of Peter Lombard," in 2004. She has since taught courses at Occidental College and Mt. San Antonio College in Walnut, California.
With a dissertation titled "Defending Russia: Russian History and Pictorial Narratives of the 'Patriotic War,' 1812-1912," Andrew Nedd received the PhD in 2005. His dissertation addresses the intersection of national identity and culture in Russian artistic representations of the "Patriotic War" of 1812. Andrew shows that the visual narrative of the events of 1812 was inextricably linked to Russia's search for national identity and helped to form competing definitions of "Russianess."
Stacey Loughrey Sloboda completed her PhD in 2004 with a dissertation titled "Making China: Design, Empire, and Aesthetics in Britain, 1745-1851." Supervised by Karen Lang, the dissertation explores the aesthetic and social roles of chinoiserie design in relation to cultures of imperialism in Britain. Reinterpreting a style that has been conventionally and negatively read as feminine, exotic, and marginal, Stacey's research demonstrates how each of these values was a central part of British aesthetic philosophy and artistic practice. Stacey served as Visiting Lecturer in the Department during the 2004-05 academic year. In fall 2005, Stacey joined the faculty of Southern Illinois University at Carbondale as Assistant Professor of Art History.
Stacey Uradomo received the PhD in 2005 with a dissertation titled "Legacies: Family Memories, History, and Identity in Japanese American Art." The dissertation examines the work of three sanei (third generation) Japanese American artists: Roger Shimomura, Tomie Arai, and Lynne Yamamoto. Stacey argues that these artists draw upon family memories in the form of diaries, photographs, and oral histories, respectively, in order to interrogate the complex relationship between memory, history, and Japanese American identity.
Sarah Warren received her Ph.D. in 2002 with a dissertation titled “Performing the Primitive: Mikhail Larinov and the Paradoxes of Russian Futurism.” She is an assistant professor of art history at the State University of New York, Purchase College. The recipient of numerous research grants, her scholarship concentrates on late imperial Russian avant-garde painting, performance, and curatorial practice. Sarah was a fellow at the Clark Art Institute in the summer of 2006.

Alumni Updates


Starleen K. Meyer (PhD, Art History, 1998) collaborates in didactic and outreach activities at the Bagatti Valsecchi Museum in Milan, Italy (www.museobagattivalsecchi.org), one of Europe's most important historic house museums, as well as caring for its web site. She gave a talk at the conference, “Musifications," to be held at the Whitworth Art Gallery in Manchester, UK, 22-23 April 2005. With Italy as its setting, the conference aims to explore the relationship between collections in domestic residences and collections absorbed into art galleries and museums. Her talk, "The Bagatti Valsecchi Museum in Milan: a Historical Historic House Museum," examines the museological choices that determined the formation of the museum. Further information about the conference may be had from the conference web site (www.art.man.ac.uk/ARTHIST/forum/musification.html) or from the organizer, Dr. Suzy Butters, Mftssbb@fs1.go.man.ac.uk. For further information about the museum, or to arrange for a personalized tour of the museum, Dr. Meyer would be happy to hear from you by email: promo@museobagattivalsecchi.org.
Agnes Bertiz (PhD, Art History, 2003) is currently teaching at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena and University of La Verne. Agnes became a CSMP (Consortium for a Strong Minority Presence at Liberal Arts Colleges) Post-Doctoral Fellow in Spring 2006, and Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Art History at Hamilton College in Clinton, New York. At Hamilton College Agnes is teaching a course on Women in Renaissance and Baroque Art and an introductory survey of Asian arts and cultures.
If you are an Art History alum and have news of a new appointment, publication, award or something else of significance that you would like to announce to your fellow USC art historians, please let us know at arthist@usc.edu. We will review your update and add it to our web page.
PROGRAMS OF STUDY

Graduate Studies

Graduate Admissions



Graduate admissions standards are competitive and based on evidence of an outstanding record in art history. All applicants are urged to schedule a personal or telephone interview with a member of the faculty in their area of interest; please see our faculty web page for information on the faculty. USC requires that Ph.D. students be admitted to both the Graduate School and the Department of Art History. The Graduate School's general admission requirements include official transcripts of all previous college and university work and official results of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). For more specific information about Art History graduate admissions, contact Adrienne Capirchio, Academic Advisor [azc@usc.edu].

To request an Information Packet and Application, please send your name and street address to arthist@usc.edu.



The deadline for Fall 2007 graduate applications is December 1, 2006.

All applicants for graduate study must submit the following to the Department of Art History:

1. Department of Art History Supplemental_Application for Fall 2007 


2. Official Transcripts
3. Official GRE Scores
4. Letters of Recommendation (3)
5. Statement of Purpose
6. Research Paper

All applicants for graduate study must submit the following to the USC Office of Graduate Admission:

1. USC Application for Graduate Admission (apply online)


2. Official Transcripts
3. Official GRE Scores

Additional information about University Admissions Requirements is available from the University's Graduate Admission web page.

Financial Aid information can be found on USC's Financial Information web page

Certificates in Areas of Concentration



Certificate in the History of Collecting and Display
The Certificate in the History of Collecting and Display is open to doctoral students in Art History as well as qualified graduate students in other departments at USC. The program provides a means of advancing knowledge about the presentation, circulation, and consumption of works of art, as distinct from the more traditional art historical emphasis on their production. Graduate students from outside of Art History must receive written permission from their home department and Art History before pursuing the Certificate.
Visual Studies Graduate Certificate

http://www.usc.edu/schools/college/visualstudies/

The Visual Studies Graduate Certificate provides Ph.D. students with the tools and knowledge necessary to think critically about visual objects and experiences and to bring that thinking to bear on their ongoing scholarly work and doctoral research. Students will combine the sustained analysis of specific representations with attention to broader philosophical frameworks and historical conditions.

This certificate is designed for students enrolled in a Ph.D. program at USC whose scholarly work includes a significant focus on visual culture. Rather than attending to visual forms (e.g. art, film, photography, advertising, digital media, illustrated books) in isolation from one another, the certificate considers the overlaps between images, texts and material objects was well as the alternative modes of interpretation such overlaps demand.

Graduate Student Symposium

Symposium Series: "Expanding the Visual Field"

Begun in 1997, the "Expanding the Visual Field" symposia are organized once a year by the graduate students in the Department of Art History at USC. Held during the spring semester, each symposium addresses a central theme that has been devised by a student committee. The event draws graduate student participants from throughout the country and concludes with a keynote address by a distinguished scholar.



Previous symposium themes include:

Space: Exploration within and Beyond the Image (2006)

Dating Ourselves: Innovation and Fatigue in the Visual Field (2005)
Configurations of Power (2004)
Staging the Body Politic (2003)
Manifestations of Cultural (Ex)Change (2002)
Different Histories, Histories of Difference (2001)
Visual Culture In (and Out) of History (2000)
The Coercive Image (1999)

Current call for Papers:





Undergraduate Studies

Bachelor of Arts in Art History
Art History combines the study of art with the study of culture. The undergraduate major provides general knowledge of the history of art and, through upper-division courses, specialized knowledge in a variety of areas. Majors are exposed to a diversity of theoretical approaches and encouraged to sharpen their critical and conceptual thinking. This foundation has enabled many art history graduates to pursue advances degrees in nationally recognized programs, to enter diverse fields, and to pursue careers in the arts.

Minor in Art History
The art history minor offers a concentrated course of study that includes a variety of objects from different historical periods and cultures in relation to their makers, patrons, viewers and critics. Students in the minor are trained to analyze visual images and information through a process of intensive looking, reading, research and writing.

Minor in Visual Culture
A critical approach to art history is the departure point for the minor in visual culture, which is dedicated to the analysis of the visual arts, broadly defined to include fine art, film and television, photography and video, illustrated books, advertising, architecture, and design. Students in the visual culture minor elect from one of three concentrations: Photography, Film, and the Reproduction of Images; Popular Culture; or Gender and Sexuality.
Courses and Requirements
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