Around the World 10th Grade World Literature Designed by: Angela Boddie ened 4414 Fall 2007



Download 373.89 Kb.
Page6/6
Date31.05.2016
Size373.89 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6

Assessment: This lesson will be assessed when I review the notes students took from the visitor’s visit. I will assess these using the check system (√,√-, or √+) as suggested by Burke (201). I will examine them qualitatively, looking for comprehension of satire while also looking for participation and completion.
Extension: Have student continue following the steps listed in the project assignment (decide what/how they will research, rhetoric they can use, etc).
Remediation: Partner students with special needs in groups that will be accommodating for them, and keep an eye on them to make sure they are understanding everything. Make sure your proximity and attentiveness is comforting.
Works Consulted:

Burke, Jim. The English Teacher’s Companion: A Complete Guide to Classroom,



Curriculum, and the Profession. Portsmouth. NH: Heinemann, 2003.

Georgia Department of Education. “Tenth-Grade Literature and Composition.”

GeorgiaStandards.Org. 1 December 2007 <http://www.georgiastandards.org/DMGetDocument.aspx/Grade%20Ten%20with%20tasks.pdf?p=6CC6799F8C1371F67D8363E8F9CAA85D187EAAAFB8BDD43842E399D5927075D7&Type=D

Herbert, Bob. “Women Are Treated Badly in Las Vegas.” New York Times 4 September 2007. Free

Republic. 25 November 2007 <http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1891045/posts>.

Hufner, Martin. “Immigration – What Europe Can Learn from the United States.” 22 February

2005. The Globalist. 3 December 2007 <http://www.theglobalist.com/DBWeb/printStoryId.aspx?StoryId=4369>.

Mangold, Tom. “’Stealth Racism’ Stalks Deep South.” 24 May 2007. BBC News. 1 December

2007 <http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/this_world/6685441.stm>.

McMahon, Robert. “UN: Powell Calls Darfur Atrocities ‘Genocide,’ As Debate Begins on New

Resolution.” 9 September 2007. RadioFreeEurope. 27 October 2007 <http://www.rferl.org/featuresarticle/2004/9/CDB82A4B-4BEB-43B1-819B-A914BE5F8856.html>.

National Council of Teachers of English. “Standards for English Language Arts.” NCTE and

IRA. 1 December 2007 < http://www.ncte.org/about/over/standards/110846.htm>.

Robinson, Mary. “Women’s Rights: Ask Mary Robinson.” Talk Show Debate. 5 October 2005.

BBC News. 25 November 2007 <http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/talking_point/4290028.stm>.

Steele, Carol. “Interviewing Immigrants.” Union High School. September 2007. Tolerance.Org.

2 December 2007 <http://www.tolerance.org/teach/activities/activity.jsp?ar=858>.

Vitello, Paul. “From Stand in Long Island Slavery Case, a Snapshot of a Hidden U.S. Problem.”

3 December 2007. New York Times 3 December 2007 <http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/03/nyregion/03slavery.html>.

frame12

E
Ms. Boddie’s 10th Grade World Literature Student:___________________________________

Period:____________________________________ Date: ___________________________________


xperience with Immigration:


Note-taking page for visitor

  • What is our visitor’s name? __________________________________________________

  • Where is he/she from? ______________________________________________________

  • How long has he/she been in the United States? _______________________________

  • Why did the person come here? _____________________________________________

  • Find and circle our visitor’s native country on the map below:





  • Write two things in the visitor’s language and be prepared to use them:

    1. ________________________________________________________________________

    2. ________________________________________________________________________

  • What did our visitor say was the hardest thing about being an immigrant? _____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

Lesson Plan #8

Tuesday of Week 5 in Unit 1 of the Semester

Name: Ms. Boddie

School: MONV High School

Lesson Title: “Do You Speak American?”
Annotation: Students will continue to gain insight into the challenges faced by immigrants in the US by watching a video clip (“Do you speak American?”) and then responding in creative written form to how they would feel if they were forced to learn a new language. Students will also be given time to work on their speech projects.
Primary Learning Outcome: Students should understand some of the challenges and arguments for homogenous language in a country, and use self-reflection and empathy to apply it to themselves.
Additional Learning Outcome (optional): Students will also continue to improve their interactive skills by working in groups; they will utilize the critical thinking skills of application, analysis, and synthesis as they plan their performance projects (Mini-Debates).
Assessed GPS’s:

  1. ELA10RL5 The student understands and acquires new vocabulary and uses it correctly in reading and writing. The student

    1. Identifies and correctly uses idioms, cognates, words with literal and figurative meanings, and patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or functions.

  2. ELA10RC4 The student establishes a context for information acquired by reading across subject areas. The student

    1. Explores life experiences related to subject area content.

    2. Discusses in both writing and speaking how certain words and concepts relate to multiple subjects.

    3. Determines strategies for finding content and contextual meaning for unfamiliar words or concepts.

  3. ELA10W4 The student practices both timed and process writing and, when applicable, uses the writing process to develop, revise, and evaluate writing. The student

    1. Plans and drafts independently and resourcefully.

    2. Revises writing to improve the logic and coherence of the organization and controlling perspective.

    3. Revises writing for specific audiences, purposes, and formality of the contexts.

    4. Revises writing to sharpen the precision of word choice and achieve desired tone.

    5. Edits writing to improve word choice, grammar, punctuation, etc.



Non-Assessed GPS’s (optional):

  1. ELA10LSV1 The student participates in student-to-teacher, student-to-student, and group verbal interactions. The student

    1. Initiates new topics in addition to responding to adult-initiated topics.

    2. Asks relevant questions.

    3. Responds to questions with appropriate information.

    4. Actively solicits another person’s comments or opinion.

    5. Offers own opinion forcefully without domineering.

    6. Contributes voluntarily and responds directly when solicited by teacher or discussion leader.

    7. Gives reasons in support of opinions expressed.

    8. Clarifies, illustrates, or expands on a response when asked to do so; asks classmates for similar expansions.

    9. Employs group decision-making techniques such as brainstorming or a problem-solving sequence (i.e., recognizes problem, defines problem, identifies possible solutions, selects optimal solution, implements solution, evaluates solution).

    10. Divides labor so as to achieve the overall group goal efficiently.

  2. ELA10LSV2 The student formulates reasoned judgments about written and oral communication in various media genres. The student delivers focused, coherent, and polished presentations that convey a clear and distinct perspective, demonstrate solid reasoning, and combine traditional rhetorical strategies of narration, exposition, persuasion, and description. When responding to visual and oral texts and media (i.e., television, radio, film productions, and electronic media), the student:

    1. Analyzes historically significant speeches to find the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

    2. Evaluates the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker’s important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, diction, and syntax.

    3. Analyzes the types of arguments used by the speaker, including argument by causation, analogy, authority, emotion, and logic.

    4. Identifies logical fallacies used in oral addresses (i.e., attack ad hominem, false causality, red herring, overgeneralization, bandwagon effect).

    5. Analyzes the four basic types of persuasive speech (i.e., propositions of fact, value, problem, or policy) and understands the similarities and differences in their patterns of organization and the use of persuasive language, reasoning, and proof.


National Standards:

  • 1) Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.

  • 3)  Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).

  • 4)  Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

  • 7)  Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and non-print texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience.

  • 9) Students develop an understanding of and respect for diversity in language use, patterns, and dialects across cultures, ethnic groups, geographic regions, and social roles.


Materials:

  1. Copies of “English Only at Famous Philly Cheesesteak Joint” for each student

  2. Prepped “Do You Speak American” video clip (see works cited)


Total Duration: 1 hour block
Technology Connection (optional): Smart board and DVD/VHS set up to play “Do You Speak American” video clip
Procedures:

  1. Watch video clip: Do you speak American? (20 minutes)

    1. Discuss

  2. Read: Philly Restaurant article (10 minutes)

    1. Discuss

  3. Mad write: you suddenly find yourself in the make-believe country of Swashnia and are told you may only speak Swashniki. Write a letter home. (10 minutes)

    1. Share letters with the class (9 minutes)

  4. Group work on performance projects: have students get into their pairs and work on their projects (10 minutes)

  5. HW: Keep working on your presentations (1 minute)


Assessment: This lesson will be assessed when I review the mad writes. I will assess these using the check system (√,√-, or √+) as suggested by Burke (201). I will examine them qualitatively, looking for comprehension, participation, and completion.
Extension: Extend discussion of English-only by relating it to yesterday’s visitor.
Remediation: Make sure you keep an eye on students with special needs and give them extra time to finish their mad writes and that they are working well with their partners during the group work time.
Works Consulted:

Burke, Jim. The English Teacher’s Companion: A Complete Guide to Classroom,



Curriculum, and the Profession. Portsmouth. NH: Heinemann, 2003.

Do You Speak American? Dir. William Cran. Perf. Robert MacNeil, Orlagh Cassidy, Tom

Ammiano. January 5, 2005. DVD. WNET Channel 13 NY, 2005.

Georgia Department of Education. “Tenth-Grade Literature and Composition.”

GeorgiaStandards.Org. 1 December 2007 <http://www.georgiastandards.org/DMGetDocument.aspx/Grade%20Ten%20with%20tasks.pdf?p=6CC6799F8C1371F67D8363E8F9CAA85D187EAAAFB8BDD43842E399D5927075D7&Type=D

“English Only at Famous Philly Cheesesteak Joint.” 9 June 2006. ABC News. 20 December 2007

<http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/story?id=2057207&page=1%20>.

National Council of Teachers of English. “Standards for English Language Arts.” NCTE and



IRA. 1 December 2007 < http://www.ncte.org/about/over/standards/110846.htm>.




Share with your friends:
1   2   3   4   5   6




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2020
send message

    Main page