Around the World 10th Grade World Literature Designed by: Angela Boddie ened 4414 Fall 2007



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Lesson Plan #6

Friday of Week 4 in Unit 1 of the Semester

Name: Ms. Boddie

School: MONV High School

Essential Question: How does my idea of an “ideal” world affect how I see the world around me?
Annotation: Students will continue to increase their ability to assess the persuasive techniques of various forms of text by examining a cartoon about school and reading an excerpt from Thomas More’s Utopia. They will also demonstrate their understanding of persuasiveness by turning in their persuasive essays.
Primary Learning Outcome: Students should understand better how their idea of “Utopia” is influenced by their worldview and come to terms with some of their own ideals.
Additional Learning Outcome (optional): Students will learn about the importance of turning projects in on time by turning their essays in on time; students will learn biographical information about Thomas More and the historical context of Utopia.
Assessed GPS’s:

  1. ELA10W1 The student produces writing that establishes an appropriate organizational structure, sets a context and engages the reader, maintains a coherent focus throughout, and signals closure. The student

    1. Establishes a clear, distinctive, and coherent thesis or perspective and maintains a consistent tone and focus throughout.

    2. Selects a focus, structure, and point of view relevant to the purpose, genre expectations, audience, length, and format requirements.

    3. Constructs arguable topic sentences, when applicable, to guide unified paragraphs.

    4. Uses precise language, action verbs, sensory details, appropriate modifiers, and active rather than passive voice.

    5. Uses traditional structures for conveying information (i.e., chronological order, cause and effect, similarity and difference, and posing and answering a question).

    6. Supports statements and claims with anecdotes, descriptions, facts and statistics, and specific examples

  2. ELA10W2 The student demonstrates competence in a variety of genres. The student produces narrative writing that applies polished narrative strategies acquired in previous grades to other genres of writing such as reflective compositions, historical investigative reports, and literary analyses, by raising the level of critical thinking skills and rhetorical techniques.

The student produces persuasive writing that structures ideas and arguments in a sustained and logical fashion; the student:

    1. Engages the reader by establishing a context and developing reader interest.

    2. Develops a controlling idea or formulates an arguable thesis that makes a clear and knowledgeable judgment.

    3. Uses specific rhetorical devices to support assertions (i.e., appeal to emotion or ethical belief, personal anecdote, case study, analogy, and/or logical reasoning).

    4. Clarifies and defends positions with precise and relevant evidence (i.e., facts, expert opinions, quotations, or expressions of commonly accepted beliefs).

    5. Excludes information and arguments that are irrelevant.

    6. Organizes points of argument effectively to achieve desired outcome.

    7. Addresses readers’ concerns, counterclaims, biases, and expectations.

    8. Achieves closure by summarizing main points of argument, appealing to reason, ethics, or emotion, or encouraging action.

  1. ELA10W3 The student uses research and technology to support writing. The student

    1. Formulates clear research questions and utilizes appropriate research venues (i.e., library, electronic media, personal interview, survey) to locate and incorporate evidence from primary and secondary sources.

    2. Uses supporting evidence from multiple sources to develop the main ideas within the body of a researched essay, a composition, or a technical document.

    3. Synthesizes information from multiple sources and identifies complexities and discrepancies in the information and the different perspectives found in each medium (i.e., almanacs, microfiche, news sources, in-depth field studies, speeches, journals, technical documents).

    4. Integrates quotations and citations into a written text while maintaining the flow of ideas.

    5. Uses appropriate conventions for documentation in the text, notes, and bibliographies by adhering to an appropriate style manual such as the Modern Language Association

  2. ELA10C1 The student demonstrates understanding and control of the rules of the English language, realizing that usage involves the appropriate application of conventions and grammar in both written and spoken formats. The student

    1. Demonstrates an understanding of proper English usage and control of grammar, sentence and paragraph structure, diction, and syntax.

    2. Correctly uses clauses (i.e., main and subordinate), phrases (i.e., gerund, infinitive, and participial), and mechanics of punctuation (i.e., end marks, commas, semicolons, quotation marks, colons, ellipses, hyphens).

    3. Demonstrates an understanding of sentence construction (e.g., subordination, proper placement of modifiers, parallel structure) and proper English usage (i.e., consistency of verb tenses, agreement).


Non-Assessed GPS’s (optional):

  1. ELA10RL1 The student demonstrates comprehension by identifying evidence (i.e., examples of diction, imagery, point of view, figurative language, symbolism, plot events and main ideas) in a variety of texts representative of different genres (i.e., poetry, prose [short story, novel, essay, editorial, biography], and drama) and using this evidence as the basis for interpretation.

    1. The student identifies, analyzes, and applies knowledge of the purpose, structure, and elements of nonfiction and/or informational materials and provides evidence from the text to support understanding; the student:

      • Analyzes and explains the structures and elements of nonfiction works such as newspaper articles and editorials, magazine articles, journal articles, and/or other informational texts.

      • Analyzes the logic and use of evidence in an author’s argument.

      • Analyzes, evaluates, and applies knowledge of the ways authors use language, style, syntax, and rhetorical strategies for specific purposes in nonfiction works.

  2. ELA10RC2 The student participates in discussions related to curricular learning in all subject areas. The student

    1. Identifies messages and themes from books in all subject areas.

    2. Responds to a variety of texts in multiple modes of discourse.

    3. Relates messages and themes from one subject area to those in another area.

    4. Evaluates the merits of texts in every subject discipline.

    5. Examines the author’s purpose in writing.

  3. ELA10LSV1 The student participates in student-to-teacher, student-to-student, and group verbal interactions. The student

    1. Initiates new topics in addition to responding to adult-initiated topics.

    2. Asks relevant questions.

  1. d. Actively solicits another person’s comments or opinion.

  2. e. Offers own opinion forcefully without domineering.

  3. f. Contributes voluntarily and responds directly when solicited by teacher or discussion leader.

  4. g. Gives reasons in support of opinions expressed.

  5. h. Clarifies, illustrates, or expands on a response when asked to do so; asks classmates for similar expansions.

  1. ELA10LSV2 The student formulates reasoned judgments about written and oral communication in various media genres. The student delivers focused, coherent, and polished presentations that convey a clear and distinct perspective, demonstrate solid reasoning, and combine traditional rhetorical strategies of narration, exposition, persuasion, and description.

    1. Analyzes the types of arguments used by the speaker, including argument by causation, analogy, authority, emotion, and logic.


National Standards:

  • 1) Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.

  • 2) Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience

  • 3)  Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).

  • 6) Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and nonprint texts.

  • 7) Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and nonprint texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience.

  • 11)  Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.

  • 12) Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).


Materials:

  1. Transparency of cartoon (see end of lesson)

  2. Copies of “Utopia: of their slaves, and of their marriages” for each student


Total Duration: 1 hour block
Technology Connection (optional): overhead projector
Procedures:

  1. Collect student essays as they come in the room (4 minutes)

  2. Put cartoon on overhead and discuss (5 minutes): how does this show persuasion? Satire? Rhetoric?

  3. Pass out copies of Utopia and explain a little background on Thomas More and who he was, as well as his intent for writing the book (1 minute)

  4. Read Utopia passage (15 minutes)

  5. Discuss Utopia: (15 minutes)

    1. What’s going on?

    2. What do you think Thomas More wanted his readers to think?

    3. Was he persuasive? (Why/why not?)

    4. Did you see any satire? (Where?)

    5. Rhetoric?

  6. Journals: Have students reflect on – (10 minutes)

    1. What they’ve learned so far in this unit

    2. How they feel about they’re papers

    3. What they think of utopia

  7. Ask volunteers to share their thoughts (5 minutes)

  8. Announce that we will have a visitor tomorrow and that they need to be on their best behavior


Assessment: This lesson will be assessed when I review the journal entries. I will assess these using the check system (√,√-, or √+) as suggested by Burke (201). I will examine them qualitatively, looking for comprehension of the text we read while also looking for participation and completion. In addition, the essays will be graded using a rubric (see Assessment #1: Essay).
Extension: Extend discussion of Utopia by asking students what their ideal utopia would be.
Remediation: Make sure you keep an eye on students with special needs and give them extra time to finish their journal reflections.
Works Consulted:

“Boo.” 2 December 2007



<http://weblogs.elearning.ubc.ca/ross/070507_cartoon_a_a8022_p465.gif>

Burke, Jim. The English Teacher’s Companion: A Complete Guide to Classroom,



Curriculum, and the Profession. Portsmouth. NH: Heinemann, 2003.

Georgia Department of Education. “Tenth-Grade Literature and Composition.”

GeorgiaStandards.Org. 1 December 2007 <http://www.georgiastandards.org/DMGetDocument.aspx/Grade%20Ten%20with%20tasks.pdf?p=6CC6799F8C1371F67D8363E8F9CAA85D187EAAAFB8BDD43842E399D5927075D7&Type=D

More, Thomas. “UTOPIA by Thomas More. Book II: Of Their Slaves, and of Their Marriages.”

NY: Ideal Commonwealths, P.F. Collier and Son, and The Colonial Press, 1901. 30 November 2007 <http://www.thomas-more-online.org/utopia008.html>.

National Council of Teachers of English. “Standards for English Language Arts.” NCTE and



IRA. 1 December 2007 < http://www.ncte.org/about/over/standards/110846.htm>.

Cartoon for Transparency:


Lesson Plan #7

Monday of Week 5 in Unit 1 of the Semester

Name: Ms. Boddie

School: MONV High School

Lesson Title: “The Immigrant’s Perspective”
Annotation: Students will learn about the immigration process through the class visitor and begin working on their performance projects.
Primary Learning Outcome: Students will gain a deeper understanding of the perspective of immigrants and begin evaluating the implications of moving to another nation and having to learn another language and set of customs.
Additional Learning Outcome (optional): Students will practice their listening and comprehension skills by taking notes during the visitor’s speech; they will improve their geographical knowledge by learning about the visitor’s native country; they will improve their interactive skills by working in groups; they will utilize the critical thinking skills of application, analysis, and synthesis as they plan their performance projects (Mini-Debates).
Assessed GPS’s:

  1. ELA10RC4 The student establishes a context for information acquired by reading across subject areas. The student

    1. Explores life experiences related to subject area content.

    2. Discusses in both writing and speaking how certain words and concepts relate to multiple subjects.

    3. Determines strategies for finding content and contextual meaning for unfamiliar words or concepts.

  2. ELA10LSV1 The student participates in student-to-teacher, student-to-student, and group verbal interactions. The student

    1. Initiates new topics in addition to responding to adult-initiated topics.

    2. Asks relevant questions.

    3. Responds to questions with appropriate information.

    4. Actively solicits another person’s comments or opinion.

    5. Contributes voluntarily and responds directly when solicited by teacher or discussion leader.

    6. Gives reasons in support of opinions expressed.

    7. Clarifies, illustrates, or expands on a response when asked to do so; asks classmates for similar expansions.

    8. Employs group decision-making techniques such as brainstorming or a problem-solving sequence (i.e., recognizes problem, defines problem, identifies possible solutions, selects optimal solution, implements solution, evaluates solution).

    9. Divides labor so as to achieve the overall group goal efficiently.


Non-Assessed GPS’s (optional):

  1. ELA10W3 The student uses research and technology to support writing. The student

    1. Formulates clear research questions and utilizes appropriate research venues (i.e., library, electronic media, personal interview, survey) to locate and incorporate evidence from primary and secondary sources.

    2. Uses supporting evidence from multiple sources to develop the main ideas within the body of a researched essay, a composition, or a technical document.

    3. Synthesizes information from multiple sources and identifies complexities and discrepancies in the information and the different perspectives found in each medium (i.e., almanacs, microfiche, news sources, in-depth field studies, speeches, journals, technical documents).

  2. ELA10LSV2 The student formulates reasoned judgments about written and oral communication in various media genres. The student delivers focused, coherent, and polished presentations that convey a clear and distinct perspective, demonstrate solid reasoning, and combine traditional rhetorical strategies of narration, exposition, persuasion, and description. When responding to visual and oral texts and media (i.e., television, radio, film productions, and electronic media), the student:

    1. Analyzes historically significant speeches to find the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

    2. Evaluates the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker’s important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, diction, and syntax.

    3. Analyzes the types of arguments used by the speaker, including argument by causation, analogy, authority, emotion, and logic.

    4. Identifies logical fallacies used in oral addresses (i.e., attack ad hominem, false causality, red herring, overgeneralization, bandwagon effect).

    5. Analyzes the four basic types of persuasive speech (i.e., propositions of fact, value, problem, or policy) and understands the similarities and differences in their patterns of organization and the use of persuasive language, reasoning, and proof.

When delivering and responding to presentations, the student:

  1. Delivers narrative, expository, or persuasive presentations that incorporate the same elements found in that mode or genre of writing.

  2. Delivers oral responses to literature that incorporate the same elements found in written literary analysis.

  3. Uses props, visual aids, graphs, or electronic media to enhance the appeal and accuracy of presentations.


National Standards:

  • 1) Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.

  • 3) Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).

  • 4) Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

  • 7)  Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and non-print texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience.

  • 9)  Students develop an understanding of and respect for diversity in language use, patterns, and dialects across cultures, ethnic groups, geographic regions, and social roles.


Materials:

  1. A couple of copies of questions for immigrant visitor (to make sure they have the copy and the teacher has one to follow along with – use note sheet at end)

  2. Copies of note sheet (see end of lesson) for Immigrant visitor presentation

  3. PowerPoint presentation of Mini-Debate project

  4. Copies of Mini-Debate assignment project for each student (see assessment #2)

  5. One copy of each news article, per period, for groups to choose from (7 copies of each article)


Total Duration: 1 hour block
Technology Connection (optional): PowerPoint Presentation of Mini-Debate Project (see end of lesson)
Procedures:

  1. Announcements: (1 minute)

    1. Visitor (introduce Maria)

    2. Class Project

  2. Introduce guest speaker (Maria from Romania)

    1. Hand out note sheet (see end of lesson) and explain that these are to be turned in at the end of class (2 minutes)

    2. Allow Maria/Visitor to speak about her/his experience with immigration (12 minutes)

    3. Allow students to ask questions (direct them using note sheet; make sure she covered all of the questions listed there) (5 minutes)

    4. Thanks Maria and have class clap to show their appreciation (1 minute)

  3. Introduce group projects using PowerPoint (see end of lesson) (5 minutes)

  4. Divide class into groups (5 minutes) and pass out copies of articles for them to choose from

    1. “Women’s Rights: Ask Mary Robinson”

    2. “Women Are Treated Badly in Las Vegas”

    3. “’Stealth Racism’ Stalks Deep South”

    4. “From Stand in Long Island Slavery Case, a Snapshot of a Hidden U.S. Problem.”

    5. “UN: Powell Calls Darfur Atrocities ‘Genocide’”

    6. “Immigration – What Europe Can Learn from the United States”

  5. Have groups decide on their topics and submit them to the teacher and begin planning their projects (20 minutes)

  6. HW: research their topics (1 minute)

  7. Ticket-out-the door: say something in Romanian (the visitor’s language)




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