Arizona college and career ready



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ARIZONA COLLEGE AND CAREER READY STANDARDS

English Language Arts/Literacy in History, Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects



Purpose:

  • an at-a-glance visual representation of the ACCRS integrated model of literacy, “verbs”, executive functions, and prompting expectations

  • a collection of resources including the prompting hierarchy, Bloom’s Taxonomy, Webb’s Depth of Knowledge, and Universal Design for Learning

  • a means to plan and align instruction and assessment (DOK/UDL)

  • a tool by which IEP goals and objectives can be individualized







Information compiled by:

Kevin Schaefer/kschaefe@wested.org

Assistant Director of Special Programs

WestEd





ACCRS Integrated Model Of Literacy Color Key
Test – Expressive Language (ask, “How will student demonstrate…?”

focus on verbs, i.e., eye gaze, gesturing, behavior, assistive

technology, speaking, writing)

Text – Executive Functions

(recall, prior knowledge, organization, perseverance, resiliency,

prioritizing, self-regulation, evaluation)

Text – Reading

Text – Writing

Text – Speaking & Listening

Text – Language

For further information regarding prompting: https://wiki.ncscpartners.org/mediawiki/index.php/Instructional_Resource_Guide

Goal/objectives progression should indicate deepened difficulty/rigor across time (moving from left to right)

BLOOM’S TAXONOMY

Remembering

Understanding

Applying

Analyzing

Evaluating

Creating

Can the student recall or remember the information?
define

duplicate

list

memorize


recall

repeat reproduce

state


Can the student explain ideas or concepts?
classify

describe


discuss

explain


identify

locate


recognize

report


select

translate

paraphrase


Can the student use the information in a new way?
choose demonstrate dramatize employ

illustrate interpret operate

schedule

sketch


solve

use


write.

Can the student distinguish between the different parts?
appraise compare contrast

criticize differentiate discriminate distinguish examine experiment question

test


Can the student justify a stand or decision?
appraise

argue


defend

judge


select

support


value

evaluate


Can the student create new product or point of view?
assemble, construct

create


design

develop


formulate

write




prompt hierarchy.jpg






Communicative competence is the foundation by which students benefit from instruction, curriculum, and assessments that are targeted to their ability levels and prepare them for college, career, and community readiness//independence. IEP teams should ensure students have a viable mode of communication that is reflective of their receptive and expressive skill level.






Executive function is a set of mental process that helps connect past experience with present action. People use it to perform activities such as planning, organizing, strategizing, paying attention to and remembering details, and managing time and space.” NCLD Executive functions may need to be considered by IEP teams when developing individualized goals and designing instruction that allow for student access to information










Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is an educational framework which promotes flexible instructional environments for ALL students. UDL practices are intended to provide increased access to the curriculum by reducing physical, cognitive, intellectual, and other barriers and is a foundation for ACCRS implementation. For special education purposes, UDL practices should be indicative of specially designed instruction based on IEP Team determinations.










To develop a reasonably calculated IEP, identification of student needs, individualized goals, and services, must be based on assessment information and progress monitored to ensure the student is benefiting from his/her education over time. Assessments should be used formatively to guide instruction determine appropriate adaptations, and adjust goals and services as needed.





  • Reading Foundations

    • RF.K.1-3: note emphasis on spoken words/ phonemic awareness

    • RF.1.2: note the emphasis on spoken words/ phonemic awareness

    • RF.1-5.3&4: note progression from spoken words/ phonemic awareness to spelling/sound relationships to decoding/reading

    • Consider language-based disabilities (auditory processing) when addressing phonemic awareness




    Speaking and Listening

    • Reading expectations are included: SL.3-12.1

    • Writing (fine motor) expectations are included: SL.K-5.5

    • Language expectations are included: SL.1-12.6

    • Consider language-based disabilities (auditory processing) when addressing oral, i.e., expressive/receptive language

    • Executive functions are numerous and critical




    Reading Informational Text

    • RI.K-12.4: reference to L.K-12.4-6

    • RI.7: integrates listening (info. orally presented)

    • RI.4&5.9: integrates writing and speaking

    • RI.2-5.10: integrates history/social studies, science and technical texts

    • Note executive functions and ask, “under what conditions will the student demonstrate mastery?”

    Language

    • Reading AND speaking expectations are included: L.K-12.1

    • Writing/spelling expectations are included: L.K-12.2

    • Reading, writing, AND speaking and listening expectations are included: L.2-12.3 and L.9-12.6

    • Reading and speaking and listening expectations are included: L.K-3.6

    • Executive functions are numerous and critical

    The ACCRS Integrated Model of Literacy

    (Refer to color coding)

    Reading Literature

    • Find references to “prompting and support”

    • RL.K-12.4: reference to L.K-12.4-6

    • RL.K-2.5: differentiates between RL and RI

    • RL.K-5.8: is not applicable

    • RL.3&4.5: integrates writing and speaking

    • RL.2.6: integrates speaking

    • RL.4-12.7: integrates speaking (oral presentation receptive language)

    • Note executive functions and ask, “under what conditions will the student demonstrate mastery?

    Writing

    • Find references to “guidance and support”

    • W.K-12.1-3: lists types of writing as 1.opinion/argument; 2.informative/explanatory; 3.narrative

    • W.6-12.1: “opinion” pieces change to “argument”

    • W.2-12.4: references “Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in writing standards 1-3”

    • W.3-12.5: references “Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of L standards 1-3”

    • Reading expectations are included: W.3-12.8 and W.4-12.9

    • Executive functions are numerous and critical



College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading

The K–5 standards on the following pages define what students should understand and be able to do by the end of each grade. They correspond to the College and Career Readiness (CCR) anchor standards below by number. The CCR and grade-specific standards are necessary complements—the former providing broad standards, the latter providing additional specificity—that together define the skills and understandings that all students must demonstrate.


Key Ideas and Details

  1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

  2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

  3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.


Craft and Structure

  1. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

  2. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.

  3. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.


Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

  1. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.*

  2. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

  3. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.


Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

  1. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.



Note on range and content of student reading

To build a foundation for college and career readiness, students must read widely and deeply from among a broad range of high-quality, increasingly challenging literary and informational texts. Through extensive reading of stories, dramas, poems, and myths from diverse cultures and different time periods, students gain literary and cultural knowledge as well as familiarity with various text structures and elements. By reading texts in history/social studies, science, and other disciplines, students build a foundation of knowledge in these fields that will also give them the background to be better readers in all content areas. Students can only gain this foundation when the curriculum is intentionally and coherently structured to develop rich content knowledge within and across grades. Students also acquire the habits of reading independently and closely, which are essential to their future success.



* Please see “Research to Build and Present Knowledge” in Writing and “Comprehension and Collaboration” in Speaking and Listening for additional standards relevant to gathering, assessing, and applying information from print and digital sources.


RL Reading Standards for Literature K–5

The following standards offer a focus for instruction each year and help ensure that students gain adequate exposure to a range of texts and tasks. Rigor is also infused through the requirement that students read increasingly complex texts through the grades. Students advancing through the grades are expected to meet each year’s grade-specific standards and retain or further develop skills and understandings mastered in preceding grades.






Kindergartners:

Grade 1 Students:

Grade 2 Students:

Grade 3 Students:

Grade 4 Students:

Grade 5 Students:

Key Ideas and Details

1. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

1. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

1. Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.

1. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

1. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

1. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

2. With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details.

2. Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson.

2. Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral.

2. Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text.

2. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.

2. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text.

3. With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.

3. Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.

3. Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.

3. Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

3. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).

3. Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).

Craft and Structure

4. Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.

4. Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.

4. Describe how words and phrases

(e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song



4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).

4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.

5. Recognize common types of texts (e.g., storybooks, poems, etc.)

5. Explain major differences between books that tell stories and books that give information, drawing on a wide reading of a range of text types.

5. Describe the overall structure of a story, including describing how the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the action.

5. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.

5. Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking about

a text.


5. Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fit together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem.

6. With prompting and support, name the author and illustrator of a story and define the role of each in telling the story.

6. Identify who is telling the story at various points in a text.

6. Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud.

6. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters.

6. Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.

6. Describe how a narrator’s or speaker’s point of view influences how events are described.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

7. With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts).

7. Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.

7. Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot.

7. Explain how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting).

7. Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text.

7. Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, poem).

8. (Not applicable to literature)

8. (Not applicable to literature)

8. (Not applicable to literature)

8. (Not applicable to literature)

8. (Not applicable to literature)

8. (Not applicable to literature)

9. With prompting and support, compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in familiar stories.

9. Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories.

9. Compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story (e.g., Cinderella stories) by different authors or from different cultures.

9. Compare and contrast the themes, settings, and plots of stories written by the same author about the same or similar characters (e.g., in books from a series).

9. Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.

9. Compare and contrast the stories in the same genre (e.g., mysteries and adventure

stories) on their approaches to similar themes and topics.



Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

  1. Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding.




  1. With prompting and support, read prose and poetry of appropriate complexity for grade 1.




10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories and poetry, in the grades 2–3 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the grades 2–3

text complexity band independently and proficiently.



10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, in the grades 4–5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the grades 4–5 text complexity band independently and proficiently.


RI Reading Standards for Informational Text K–5

The following standards offer a focus for instruction each year and help ensure that students gain adequate exposure to a range of texts and tasks. Rigor is also infused through the requirement that students read increasingly complex texts through the grades. Students advancing through the grades are expected to meet each year’s grade-specific standards and retain or further develop skills and understandings mastered in preceding grades.






Kindergartners:

Grade 1 Students:

Grade 2 Students:

Grade 3 Students:

Grade 4 Students:

Grade 5 Students:

Key Ideas and Details

1. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

1. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

1. Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.

1. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

1. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

1. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

2. With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.

2. Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.

2. Identify the main topic of a multiparagraph text as well as the focus of specific paragraphs within the text.

2. Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.

2. Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.

2. Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.

3. With prompting and support, describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.

3. Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.

3. Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text.

3. Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.

3. Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.

3. Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific,

or technical text based on specific information in the text.



Craft and Structure

4. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.


4. Ask and answer questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases in a text.

4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area.

4. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3 topic or subject area.

4. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area.

4. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 5 topic or subject area.

5. Identify the front cover, back cover, and title page of a book.

5. Know and use various text features (e.g., headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text.

5. Know and use various text features (e.g., captions, bold print, subheadings, glossaries, indexes, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently.

5. Use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.

5. Describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text.

5. Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.

6. Name the author and illustrator of a text and define the role of each in presenting the ideas or information in a text.

6. Distinguish between information provided by pictures or other illustrations and information provided by the words in a text.

6. Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain,

or describe.

6. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text.

6. Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided.

6. Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

7. With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the text in which they appear (e.g., what person, place, thing, or idea in the text an illustration depicts).

7. Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas.

7. Explain how specific images (e.g., a diagram showing how a machine works) contribute to and clarify a text.

7. Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).

7. Interpret information presented visually,

orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.

7. Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.

8. With prompting and support, identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.

8. Identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.

8. Describe how reasons support specific points the author makes in a text.

8. Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence).

8. Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text.

8. Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point(s).

9. With prompting and support, identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).

9. Identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).

9. Compare and contrast the most important points presented by two texts on the same topic

9. Compare and contrast the most important points and key details presented in two texts on the same topic

9. Integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

9. Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

  1. Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding.

a. Actively engage in group reading of informational and functional texts, including history social studies, science, and technical texts, with purpose and understanding.


  1. With prompting and support, read informational texts appropriately complex for grade 1.

a. With prompting and support, read functional texts, including history social studies, science, and technical texts, appropriately complex for grade 1.



10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades 2–3 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

a. By of end of the year, read and comprehend functional texts, including history social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades 2-3 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.




10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 2–3 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

a. By the end of the year, read and comprehend functional texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 2–3 text complexity band independently and proficiently.



10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades 4–5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of

the range.

a. By the end of year, read and comprehend functional texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades 4–5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.


10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 4–5 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

a. By the end of the year, read and comprehend functional texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 4–5 text complexity band independently and proficiently.




RF Reading Standards: Foundational Skills K–5

These standards are directed toward fostering students’ understanding and working knowledge of concepts of print, the alphabetic principle, and other basic conventions of the English writing system. These foundational skills are not an end in and of themselves; rather, they are necessary and important components of an effective, comprehensive reading program designed to develop proficient readers with the capacity to comprehend texts across a range of types and disciplines. Instruction should be differentiated: good readers will need much less practice with these concepts than struggling readers will. The point is to teach students what they need to learn and not what they already know—to discern when particular children or activities warrant more or less attention. Note: In kindergarten, children are expected to demonstrate increasing awareness and competence in the areas that follow.






Kindergartners:

Grade 1 Students:

Grade 2 Students:

Grade 3 Students:

Grade 4 Students:

Grade 5 Students:

Print Concepts

  1. Demonstrate understanding of the organization and basic features of print.

    1. Follow words from left to right, top to bottom, and page by page.

    2. Recognize that spoken words are represented in written language by specific sequences of letters.

    3. Understand that words are separated by spaces in print.

    4. Recognize and name all upper- and lowercase letters of the alphabet.

  1. Demonstrate understanding of the organization and basic features of print.

    1. Recognize the distinguishing features of a sentence (e.g., first word, capitalization, ending punctuation).













Phonological Awareness

  1. Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes).

    1. Recognize and produce rhyming words.

    2. Count, pronounce, blend, and segment syllables in spoken words.

    3. Blend and segment onsets and rimes of single-syllable spoken words.

    4. Isolate and pronounce the initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in three-phoneme (consonant-vowel- consonant, or CVC) words.* (This does not include CVCs ending with /l/, /r/, or /x/.)

    5. Add or substitute individual sounds (phonemes) in simple, one- syllable words to make new words.



  1. Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes).

    1. Distinguish long from short vowel sounds in spoken single-syllable words.

    2. Orally produce single-syllable words by blending sounds (phonemes), including consonant blends.

    3. Isolate and pronounce initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in spoken single-syllable words.

    4. Segment spoken single-syllable words into their complete sequence of individual sounds (phonemes).













Phonics and Word Recognition

  1. Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words

    1. Demonstrate basic knowledge of one-to-one letter-sound correspondences by producing the primary sounds or many of the most frequent sounds for each consonant.

    2. Associate the long and short sounds with common spellings (graphemes) for the five major vowels. [

    3. Read common high-frequency words by sight (e.g., the, of, to, you, she, my, is, are, do, does).

    4. Distinguish between similarly spelled words by identifying the sounds of the letters that differ.

  1. Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.

    1. Know the spelling-sound correspondences for common consonant digraphs.

    2. Decode regularly spelled one-syllable words.

    3. Know final -e and common vowel team conventions for representing long vowel sounds.

    4. Use knowledge that every syllable must have a vowel sound to determine the number of syllables in a printed word.

    5. Decode two-syllable words following basic patterns by breaking the words into syllables.

    6. Read words with inflectional endings.

    7. Recognize and read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words.

  1. Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.

    1. Distinguish long and short vowels when reading regularly spelled one-syllable words.

    2. Know spelling-sound correspondences for additional common vowel teams.

    3. Decode regularly spelled two-syllable words with long vowels.

    4. Decode words with common prefixes and suffixes.

    5. Identify words with inconsistent but common spelling-sound correspondences.

    6. Recognize and read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words.

  1. Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.

    1. Identify and know the meaning

of the most common prefixes and derivational suffixes.

    1. Decode words with common Latin suffixes.

    2. Decode multisyllable words.

    3. Read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words.

  1. Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.

    1. Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context and out of context.

  1. Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.

    1. Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context and out of context.

Fluency

4. Read emergent-reader texts with purpose and understanding.

  1. Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.

    1. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding.

    2. Read on-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.

    3. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.

  1. Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.

    1. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding.

    2. Read on-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.

    3. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.

  1. Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.

    1. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding.

    2. Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy,

appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.

    1. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.

  1. Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.

    1. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding.

    2. Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy,

appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.

    1. Use context to confirm or self- correct word recognition and understanding, rereading

as necessary.

  1. Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.

    1. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding.

    2. Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy,

appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.

    1. Use context to confirm or self- correct word recognition and understanding, rereading

as necessary.

* Words, syllables, or phonemes written in /slashes/ refer to their pronunciation or phonology. Thus, /CVC/ is a word three phonemes regardless of the number of letters in the spelling of the word.

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