Arh 246 aa: History of Graphic Design Fall 2014



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ARH 246 AA: History of Graphic Design Fall 2014


Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:30 to 12:45

Prerequisite: ART107 (Foundations II), or permission


Professor Peter Barr, Ph.D.

Office telephone with voicemail: 517 264-7863

Email: pbarr@sienaheights.edu

Office hours: Mondays and Wednesdays 12:45 to 3:15, Thursdays 10:00 to 11:00 and by appointment.


Course Description (as it appears in the catalogue):

Students in this course will become familiar with key examples of European and American graphic communication within their historical contexts, from the dawn of writing through the postmodern era.


Method of Instruction:

This course includes brief lectures, but primarily asks the student to work collaboratively on a series of projects that will demonstrate their familiarity with the key developments in the history of graphic design. These projects include: creating designs based on historical examples, preparing brief PowerPoint presentations, developing a timeline, and writing a series of essays.


Required Text:

Patrick Cramsie, The Story of Graphic Design From the Invention of Writing to the Birth of Digital Design, New York: Abrams, 2010. The book has a list price of $40, but is available at Amazon.com new for $16.00 and used for about $12.00. It begins with the origins of the alphabet and carries the reader through the first handwritten books, the invention of printing in the Renaissance, the eruption of printed media in the 19th and 20th centuries, and the impact of digital technology on design today.


Course Goals:
By the end of this course, you will:

  • Collaborate effectively with another student to complete the course requirements.

  • Create a website to display your team’s portfolio of work for this class.

  • Produce a series of written phrases based on historical alphabets and writing systems.

  • Develop a time line that places the key events associated with invention of printing, paper, and moveable type in chronological order.

  • Prepare and deliver a PowerPoint presentation on two key historical figures from the Renaissance, Baroque, and Rococo eras.

  • Create three designs inspired by key examples from the 20th-century.

  • Write a series of essays comparing and contrasting key developments in 20th century visual culture.

  • Write an essay predicting the future of graphic design.



Groups (created using an online random number generator). Please give your group a corporate name.

  1. Jesse Bell & Matt Leaders:

  2. Erin Blohm & Atlanta Roberts:

  3. Gianni Chesnick & Beverly Woodbury:

  4. Matt Leppik & Chloe Rick:

  5. Ashley Elliott & Greg Manning:

  6. Tabitha Ferguson & Nate Lunsford:

  7. Megan Foster & Terrell McGee:

  8. Aaron Pelham & Olivia Smith:

  9. Kate Dombrowski:


Expectation for Work, Attendance, Punctuality and Wise Use of Class Time:

You are expected to dedicate nine hours of work each week for each three-credit course you take in the Art Department—combining the time you spend in class and out of class. This policy is dictated by our accrediting agency, the National Association of Schools of Art and Design. Since this class meets for just two and a half hours per week, you should budget approximately six more hours per week to complete assignments. Please build this amount of time into your schedule.


Class time will be dedicated to background lectures that will assist you with your projects as well as opportunities for you to collaborate with your work partner and for me to give you feedback on your work.
Since many classes will start with a lecture, you need to come to class on time each day. I take attendance every day and note who is on time and who is using class time wisely. Your attendance, punctuality, and use of class time can impact your grade both positively and negatively.
Grading and Assignments:
Your grade will be assessed at a midterm and final critique, when your team will present your website/portfolio containing all of the work that you’ve produced for this class.
Grading Standards

  • A (100% to 90%) means that you have thoroughly demonstrated assessment criteria.

  • B (89% to 80%) means that you have sufficiently demonstrated assessment criteria.

  • C (79% to 70%) means that you have demonstrated some of the assessment criteria.

  • D (69% to 60%) means that you have demonstrated a little of the assessment criteria.

  • F (below 60%) means you have made no significant demonstration of assessment criteria.



Assignments

  • Collaborate effectively with another student to complete all of these assignments except for the last one: 100 points at midterm and 100 points at the final critique.

  • Create a website to display your team’s portfolio of work for this class: 100 points at midterm and 100 points at the final critique.

  • Produce a dozen written phrases based on historical alphabets and writing systems from ancient and medieval civilizations: 300 points.

  • Create an original "manuscript page" inspired by the Incipit Page of the Gospel of Saint Matthew in the Lindisfarne Gospels incorporating key features of the manuscript's design as well as invented letterforms inspired by historical examples: 200 points.

  • Develop a time line that places the key events associated with invention of printing, paper, and moveable type into chronological order: 100 points.

  • Prepare and deliver a brief PowerPoint presentation on two key figures associated with Renaissance, Baroque, and Rococo letterforms: 100 points.

  • Create three simple designs inspired by Victorian advertising, Gothic Revival, and Art Nouveau: 150 points.

  • Write an essay comparing and contrasting the development and use of the Bauhaus Universal and Times New Roman fonts within the context of Beatrice Ward’s 1930 speech, “The Crystal Goblet”: 150 points

  • Produce three original artworks inspired by three pairs of twentieth-century designs, including visual puns, Futurist & Punk, and Swiss Style & Psychedelic; and write brief comparison/contrast essays that reveal the key similarities and differences within each pair: 300 points.

  • Working alone, without your partner, write an essay predicting the future of graphic design: 300 points.


Students with Learning Disabilities:

Siena Heights University is committed to providing a learning environment that benefits all students. Pursuant to the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 all reasonable accommodations will be made to meet the documented needs of students. Siena’s Accommodations Policy for Students with Disabilities requires students to provide written documentation of their disabilities to the Academic Advising Office. If you require special accommodations, it is your responsibility to notify each instructor during the first two weeks of the semester.


Art Department Learning Outcomes:
You can find learning outcomes for the Art Department and all of the programs within the Art Department at MySiena > Departments and Offices Tab > Art Department.

Classroom Rules
These rules are designed to suggest the kinds of behaviors expected of you in this classroom:http://mynhardtvanpletsen.files.wordpress.com/2007/11/juggling.jpg

  • Respect each other.

    • We will discuss a variety of topics in this course. Our discussions will always be scholarly and civil. Candor and constructive criticism of each other's ideas and work are expected. Disagreement is okay and often leads to great discussions, but degrading comments and personal attacks will not be tolerated.

  • Come to class prepared.

    • Make a calendar of due dates and pay attention them.

    • Think of school as rehearsal for your professional life. In the workplace, your inability to meet deadlines might result in you losing your job.

    • Come to class even if you are not prepared. There is no reason to make things even worse.

  • Laptops and cell phones are permitted for legitimate purposes related to this course.

    • You may use a laptop and/or cell phone during class to take notes, work on class projects, or to conduct research relevant to this course—so long as it does not distract other students because of noise, etc.

    • However, even permitted uses of your laptop or phone might be inappropriate at times. For example, you should not stare at your electronics or clack away at the keyboard during discussions and student presentations. Your focus should be on the topic at hand. Multitasking can seem rude.

    • If I catch you using your laptop or cell phone for personal "business" or amusement during class, you will no longer be permitted to use them in my classes again. This includes visits to Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Snap Chat, texting, emailing friends or family, messaging, etc.

  • No cell phones for personal business. Period.

    • Turn the ringer off.

    • If you have an emergency brewing at home that requires you to keep your cell phone on, let me know at the beginning of the class. Should your emergency call come in during class, please step out in the hall to answer it. This is the only reason that anyone should leave the class to use a phone.

  • Clean up after yourself. Don't be gross.

    • If you plan to eat in class, please be aware of how loud or pungent your food is.

    • Be mindful not to spill food, drink, or anything during class.

    • Make sure you throw away trash. Please separate trash from recyclables. recycle1

    • Leave the room looking as good as, or better than, when you came in.

  • No juggling hatchets. Just ask the Venus de Milo.


Course Schedule (subject to change):

Class 1: August 26

Read this syllabus

Form teams and decide on your corporate name.

Create a website to display your team’s portfolio of work for this class.

Introduce the first assignment, due at Midterm, to:



  • Produce a dozen written phrases based on historical alphabets and writing systems from ancient and medieval civilizations and

  • Create an original "manuscript page" inspired by the Incipit Page of the Gospel of Saint Matthew in the Lindisfarne Gospels by incorporating the key features of the manuscript's design as well as invented letterforms inspired by historical examples.

Lecture on the invention of writing in Mesopotamia: Sumerian cuneiform syllabic glyphs
Class 2: August 28

Lecture on the invention of writing in Egypt: hieroglyphs and hieratic

Work
Class 3: September 2

Lecture on Phoenician and Greek writing: abjad, monumental alphabet and uncial majuscule

Work
Class 4: September 4

Lecture on Roman writing: monumental capitals, rustic capitals, and cursive

Work
Class 5: September 9

Lecture on Early Christian writing and the distribution of monastery scriptoria and codices.

Work
Class 6: September 11

Lecture on the visual culture of pagan England that inspired the design of the Lindisfarne Gospels.

Work
September 16: Common Dialogue Day—Attend the main speaker’s event and make sure I see you there to receive credit for attendance.
Class 7: September 18

Lecture on the Insular Half Uncial used in the Lindisfarne Gospels.

Work
Class 8: September 23

Lecture on Carolingian Reforms

Work
Class 9: September 25

Lecture on Textura and Bastarda scripts

Work
Classes 10 & 11: September 30 & October 2

Create an original "manuscript page" inspired by the Incipit Page of the Gospel of Saint Matthew in the Lindisfarne Gospels by incorporating the key features of the manuscript's design as well as invented letterforms inspired by historical examples.


Classes 12 & 13: October 7 & 9

Midterm critiques. Please arrive early for your group’s scheduled critique.

Jesse Bell and Matt Leaders: October 7, 11:30

Erin Blohm and Atlanta Roberts: October 7, 11:45

Gianni Chesnick and Beverly Woodbury: October 7, 12:00

Kate Dombrowski and Chloe Rick: October 7, 12:15

Ashley Elliott and Greg Manning: October 9, 11:30

Tabitha Ferguson and Nate Lunsford: October 9, 11:45

Megan Foster and Terrell McGee: October 9, 12:00

Aaron Pelham and Olivia Smith: October 9, 12:15

Kate Dombrowski: October 9, 12:30
Class 14: October 14

Timeline: The Inventions of Printing, Paper, and Moveable Type


Classes 15 & 16: October 16 & 21

PowerPoint Project on Renaissance, Baroque, and Rococo letterforms: Each team prepares one PowerPoint presentation on two key figures.


Class 17: October 23

PowerPoint Project on Renaissance, Baroque, and Rococo letterforms: Present PowerPoint presentations.


Class 18: October 28

Summarize the developments in printing technology in the 19th century.


Classes 19 & 20: October 30 & November 4

Create three Victorian “Broadsides” (posters)



  • One using fat-face, slab serif and san serif fonts

  • One inspired by William Morris' Gothic Reivial The Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, 1896,

  • One inspired by Koloman Moser's Art Nouveau allegorical "Mädchenkopf" (head of a girl) design for the Ver Sacrum (Sacred Spring) magazine, 1899

Class 21: November 6

Write an essay comparing and contrasting the Bauhaus Universal lettering system designed by Herbert Bayer in 1926 (illustration 13.12) and the Times New Roman font designed by Stanley Morison, Victor Lardent and possibly Starling Burgess in 1932 (illustrations 14.16 and 14.17) within the context of Beatrice Warde's 1930 speech "The Crystal Goblet" (pp. 212-217)
Classes 22 & 23: November 11 & 13

Write an essay comparing and contrasting Hans Rudi Erdt's 1911 poster design for "Automobile Opel" (illustration 11.7) and Gene Federico and Bill Bernhach's 1934 advertisement for Women's Day magazine (illustration 15.22). Also design a visual pun that includes both image and text inspired by these examples.


Class 24 & 25: November 18 & 20

Write an essay comparing and contrasting Filippo Tommaso Marinetti's "In the Evening, Lying on Her Bed, She Reread the Letter from Her Artilleryman at the Front" from Words in Freedom, 1919 (ill. 12.6) and the detail of the punk fanzine poster "Ripped and Torn" from 1977 (illustration 15.22). Also design a work of “art” inspired by these examples.


Class 26: November 25

Assign final essay on “The Future of Graphic Design.” This project is to be completed by all students, not in pairs. It is due at your final critique.


Class Cancelled on Thursday, November 27, for Thanksgiving Break.
Class 27 & 28: December 2 & 4

Share preliminary work for “The Future of Graphic Design” essay in small groups.

Write an essay comparing and contrasting Carlo Vivarelli's Fűr das Alter poster from 1959 (illustration 16.8) and Wes Wilson's "The Association" poster from 1966 (illustration 17.10). Also create a poster inspired by Vivarelli’s poster.
Final Critiques for this class will be held in this room on December 9, from 11 am to 1 pm. Please arrive early for your team’s critique.

Kate Dombrowski: 1:00

Jesse Bell and Matt Leaders: 12:45

Erin Blohm and Atlanta Roberts: 12:30

Gianni Chesnick and Beverly Woodbury: 12:15

Matt Leppik and Chloe Rick: 12:00

Ashley Elliott and Greg Manning: 11:45

Tabitha Ferguson and Nate Lunsford: 11:30



Megan Foster and Terrell McGee: 11:15

Aaron Pelham and Olivia Smith: 11:00


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