Apush unit 8 Test Multiple Choice



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APUSH Unit 8 Test
Multiple Choice

Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

1. The red scare of 1919-1920 was provoked by

a.

the wartime migration of rural blacks to northern cities.

b.

urban immigrants' resistance to prohibition.

c.

public anger at evolutionary science's challenge to the biblical story of the Creation.

d.

the public's fear that labor troubles were sparked by communist and anarchist revolutionaries.

e.

Russian Communism's threat to American security.

2. Businesspeople used the red scare to



a.

establish closed shops throughout the nation.

b.

break the backs of fledgling unions.

c.

break the railroad strike of 1919.

d.

secure passage of laws making unions illegal.

e.

refuse to hire communists.

3. The most tenacious pursuer of radical elements during the red scare of the early 1920s was



a.

Frederick W. Taylor.

b.

William Jennings Bryan.

c.

J. Edgar Hoover.

d.

F. Scott Fitzgerald.

e.

A. Mitchell Palmer.

4. The Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s was a reaction against



a.

capitalism.

b.

new immigration laws passed in 1924.

c.

the nativist movements that had their origins in the 1850s.

d.

race riots.

e.

the forces of diversity and modernity that were transforming American culture.

5. The Ku Klux Klan virtually collapsed in the late 1920s when



a.

the immigration restriction laws of the early 1920s were repealed.

b.

the organization was publicly exposed as a corrupt and cynical racket.

c.

the advent of radio led to a new level of public knowledge and tolerance.

d.

the Klan proved unable to implement its program.

e.

both political parties sharply criticized the Klan as un-American.

6. Immigration restrictions of the 1920s were introduced as a result of



a.

increased migration of blacks to the North.

b.

the nativist belief that northern Europeans were superior to southern and eastern Europeans.

c.

a desire to rid the country of the quota system.

d.

the desire to halt immigration from Latin America.

e.

growing concern about urban overcrowding and crime.

7. The Immigration Act of 1924 discriminated directly against



a.

Canadians and West Indians.

b.

northern and western Europeans.

c.

Latin Americans.

d.

Jews and Muslims.

e.

southern and eastern Europeans and Japanese.

8. One of the primary obstacles to working class solidarity and organization in America was



a.

ethnic diversity.

b.

the lack of a reform impulse in America.

c.

the generally fair treatment that workers received from their employers.

d.

the hostility of the Catholic Church to social reform.

e.

the growing Communist influence in the labor movement.

9. During the 1920s and after, many American immigrant ethnic groups



a.

rapidly assimilated into the mainstream of American life.

b.

sought to escape urban poverty by migrating to rural areas.

c.

lived in neighborhoods with their own churches or synagogues, newspapers, and theaters.

d.

maintained a greater loyalty to the old country than to the United States.

e.

sought political autonomy and official recognition by the U.S. government.

10. Enforcement of the Volstead Act met the strongest resistance from



a.

women.

b.

immigrants and big-city residents.

c.

westerners and southerners.

d.

businesspeople and labor leaders.

e.

evangelical Protestants.

11. The most spectacular example of lawlessness and gangsterism in the 1920s was



a.

New York City.

b.

New Orleans.

c.

Brooklyn.

d.

Chicago.

e.

Las Vegas.

12. Top gangster Al Capone was finally convicted and sent to prison for the crime of



a.

murder.

b.

income tax evasion.

c.

kidnapping.

d.

conspiracy to violate the prohibition laws.

e.

running criminal prostitution rings.

13. John Dewey can rightly be called the "father of ____."



a.

the American research university

b.

progressive education

c.

evolutionary science

d.

psychoanalysis

e.

Hegelian philosophy

14. The immediate outcome of the 1925 Scopes Trial was that



a.

attorney Clarence Darrow got the charges against John Scopes dropped.

b.

the state of Tennessee modified its anti-evolution law.

c.

the public gained a favorable view of American fundamentalists.

d.

biology teacher John Scopes was found guilty of teaching evolution and fined.

e.

the jury was deadlocked and unable to reach a verdict.

15. The main problem faced by American manufacturers in the 1920s involved



a.

increasing the level of production.

b.

developing expanded markets of people to buy their products.

c.

reducing the level of government involvement in business.

d.

developing technologically innovative products.

e.

finding a skilled labor force.

16. In response to the need to develop greater and greater mass markets for their products, American business in the 1920s relied especially on the new techniques of



a.

developing a large range of product variation.

b.

price competition.

c.

direct selling through catalogs and door-to-door solicitation.

d.

consumer advertising.

e.

government-backed guarantees of product performance.

17. Bruce Barton, author of The Man Nobody Knows, expressed great admiration for Jesus Christ because Barton



a.

was a deeply religious man.

b.

respected Christ's image of self-sacrifice.

c.

thought Christ taught the proper use of money.

d.

saw Christ as someone who practiced the Golden Rule.

e.

believed that Christ was the best advertising man of all time.

18. During the 1920s, large numbers of Americans were able to purchase relatively expensive automobiles, appliances, and radios through the relatively new innovation of



a.

special sales and price reductions at certain times of year.

b.

consumer credit.

c.

big box discount stores.

d.

consumer co-ops.

e.

catalog sales.

19. The prosperity that developed in the 1920s



a.

was accompanied by a cloud of consumer debt.

b.

led to a growing level of savings by the American public.

c.

enabled labor unions to gain strength.

d.

was concentrated primarily in heavy industry.

e.

closed the gap between rich and poor.

20. Among the major figures promoted by mass media image makers and the new sports industry in the 1920s were



a.

John L. Sullivan and William Cody.

b.

Henry Ford and Charles Lindbergh

c.

Babe Ruth and Jack Dempsey.

d.

Al Jolson and Margaret Sanger.

e.

Mickey Mantle and Rocky Marciano.

21. Henry Ford's most distinctive contribution to the automobile industry was



a.

installment credit buying of cars.

b.

the internal combustion engine.

c.

introducing a variety of automobile models with varied colors and styles.

d.

design changes that improved speed.

e.

production of a standardized, relatively inexpensive automobile.

22. Charles Lindbergh's solo flight across the Atlantic made him an American hero especially because



a.

his political principles were widely admired.

b.

he and his wife Anne Morrow Lindbergh made such an appealing couple.

c.

his wholesome youthfulness contrasted with the cynicism and debunking of the jazz age.

d.

Americans were impressed by daredevil stunts.

e.

Lindbergh's journey opened closer cultural connections to France.

23. The first talkie motion picture was



a.

The Great Train Robbery.

b.

The Birth of a Nation.

c.

The Wizard of Oz.

d.

Gone With the Wind.

e.

The Jazz Singer.

24. Automobiles, radios, and motion pictures



a.

were less popular than had been anticipated.

b.

contributed to the standardization of American life.

c.

had little impact on traditional life-styles and values.

d.

were for the most part too expensive for ordinary working families.

e.

strengthened American family life.

25. The 1920 census revealed that, for the first time, most



a.

men worked in manufacturing.

b.

adult women were employed outside the home.

c.

Americans lived in cities.

d.

Americans lived in the trans-Mississippi West.

e.

families had fewer than four children.

26. Margaret Sanger was most noted for her advocacy of



a.

abortion rights.

b.

women's suffrage.

c.

birth control.

d.

free love.

e.

the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA).

27. To justify their new sexual frankness, many Americans pointed to



a.

increased consumption of alcohol.

b.

the decline of fundamentalism.

c.

the rise of the women's movement.

d.

the theories of Sigmund Freud.

e.

the influence of erotically explicit movies.

28. Buying stock on margin meant purchasing



a.

only a few shares of stock.

b.

inexpensive stock.

c.

little-known stock.

d.

risky or marginal stock.

e.

it on credit with only a small down payment.

29. The most influential classical film of the 1910s, D.W. Griffiths' Birth of a Nation, stirred extensive protest by African Americans because



a.

the film was heavily financed by white racist Hollywood film business owners.

b.

the film depicted the black leader Marcus Garvey in an unfavorable light.

c.

African Americans were not allowed to see the film even in northern movie theaters.

d.

the film glorified the Ku Klux Klan and portrayed blacks as corrupt politicians or rapists.

e.

Griffiths refused to use black actors.

30. As secretary of the treasury, Andrew Mellon placed the heaviest tax burden on



a.

middle-income groups.

b.

the wealthy.

c.

the working class.

d.

the business community.

e.

the estates of those deceased.

31. Which one of the following members of President Harding's cabinet proved to be incompetent and corrupt?



a.

Herbert Hoover

b.

Calvin Coolidge

c.

Andrew Mellon

d.

Charles Evans Hughes

e.

Albert Fall

32. Veterans' organizations like the American Legion successfully lobbied Congress to give them



a.

higher pay for service in military reserve or national guard units.

b.

special payments for those suffering the effects of shell shock or poison gas.

c.

financial support for college education or job training.

d.

guaranteed medical care in modern, efficient veterans' hospitals.

e.

a bonus insurance policy to compensate them for lost wages during their military service.

33. The primary reason that Warren G. Harding was willing to seize the initiative on the issue of international disarmament was that



a.

he feared renewed war in Europe.

b.

he recognized that Japan and the United States might enter a dangerous arms race.

c.

businesspeople were unwilling to help pay for a larger United States Navy.

d.

he did not want the League of Nations to take the lead on this problem.

e.

American public opinion strongly supported peacemaking efforts.

34. The 1928 Kellogg-Briand Pact



a.

formally ended World War I for the United States, which had refused to sign the Treaty of Versailles.

b.

set a schedule for German payment of war reparations.

c.

established a battleship ratio for the leading naval powers.

d.

condemned Japan for its unprovoked attack on Manchuria.

e.

officially outlawed war as a solution to international rivalry and conflict.

35. The Fordney-McCumber and Hawley-Smoot Tariff laws had the long-term effect of



a.

bringing American farmers out of the agricultural depression of the early 1920s.

b.

encouraging the United States to turn more to Asia than to Europe for imports.

c.

shrinking international trade and making it impossible for Europe to repay American war loans.

d.

lowering the prices Americans paid for domestic manufactured goods.

e.

pressuring the Europeans to lower their own tariff rates in order to retain American trade.

36. Which of the following was not a consequence of the American policy of raising tariffs sky-high in the 1920s?



a.

European nations raised their own tariffs.

b.

The postwar chaos in Europe was prolonged.

c.

International economic distress deepened.

d.

American foreign trade declined.

e.

The American economy slipped into recession.

37. The Teapot Dome scandal was centered around corrupt deals and bribes involving



a.

naval oil reserves.

b.

veterans' hospitals.

c.

the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

d.

European war debts.

e.

presidential pardons.

38. The major political scandal of Harding's administration resulted in the conviction and imprisonment of his secretary of



a.

the treasury.

b.

state.

c.

the navy.

d.

commerce.

e.

the interior.

39. Which of the following descriptive attributes is least characteristic of President Coolidge?



a.

Honesty

b.

Frugality

c.

Shyness

d.

Wordiness

e.

Caution

40. One of the major problems facing farmers in the 1920s was



a.

overproduction.

b.

the inability to purchase modern farm equipment.

c.

passage of the McNary-Haugen Bill.

d.

the prosecution of cooperatives under antitrust laws.

e.

drought and insects like the boll weevil.

41. In the mid-1920s, President Coolidge twice refused to sign legislation proposing to



a.

exempt farmers' cooperatives from the antitrust laws.

b.

defend the family farm against corporate takeovers.

c.

make the United States a member of the World Court.

d.

lower taxes.

e.

subsidize farm prices.

42. The Progressive party did not do well in the 1924 election because



a.

it could not win the farm vote.

b.

too many people shared in the general prosperity of the time to care about reform.

c.

it was too caught up in internal discord.

d.

the liberal vote was split between it and the Democratic party.

e.

La Follette could not win the Socialists' endorsement.

43. In the early 1920s, one glaring exception to America's general indifference to the outside world was its



a.

involvement in the World Court.

b.

armed intervention in the Caribbean and Central America.

c.

involvement in the League of Nations' humanitarian operations.

d.

naval buildup.

e.

continuing attempt to oust the Communists from power in the Soviet Union.

44. America's European allies argued that they should not have to repay loans that the United States made to them during World War I because



a.

the United States had owed them about $4 billion before the war.

b.

the amount of money involved was not significant.

c.

they had paid a much heavier price in lost lives, so it was only fair for the United States to write off the debt.

d.

the United States was making so much money from Mexican and Middle Eastern oil that it did not need extra dollars.

e.

Germany was not paying its reparations to them, so they could not afford to pay off the loans.

45. As a result of America's insistence that its Allies' war debts be repaid in full, the



a.

French and British demanded enormous reparations payments from Germany.

b.

German mark was ruined by drastic inflation.

c.

Allies borrowed money from Switzerland to repay the loans.

d.

Allies imposed enormously high new taxes on their citizens.

e.

Allies demanded that the United States lower its tariffs.

46. All of the following were political liabilities for Alfred E. Smith except his



a.

Catholic religion.

b.

support for the repeal of prohibition.

c.

big-city background.

d.

failure to win the support of American labor.

e.

radio speaking skill.

47. One of Herbert Hoover's chief strengths as a presidential candidate was his



a.

adaptability to the give-and-take of political accommodation.

b.

considerable experience in running for political office.

c.

personal charm and charisma.

d.

ability to face criticism.

e.

talent for administration.

48. As a result of the Hawley-Smoot Tariff of 1930



a.

American industry grew more secure.

b.

duties on agricultural products decreased.

c.

American economic isolationism ended.

d.

campaign promises to labor were fulfilled.

e.

the worldwide depression deepened.

49. In America, the Great Depression caused



a.

people to blame the economic system, not themselves, for their problems.

b.

a decade-long decline in the birthrate.

c.

an increase of foreign investment because prices were so low.

d.

a shift from Wall Street investment to investment in small, local businesses.

e.

a growing acceptance by business of the need for federal regulation.

50. President Herbert Hoover believed that the Great Depression could be ended by doing all of the following except



a.

providing direct aid to the people.

b.

directly assisting businesses and banks.

c.

keeping faith in the efficiency of the industrial system.

d.

continuing to rely on the American tradition of rugged individualism.

e.

lending federal funds to feed farm livestock.

51. The major new agency established by the Hoover administration to address the deepening depression was the



a.

Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC).

b.

National Recovery Administration (NRA).

c.

Works Progress Administration (WPA).

d.

Reconstruction Finance Corporation (RFC).

e.

Securities Exchange Commission (SEC).

52. The Reconstruction Finance Corporation was established to



a.

provide direct economic assistance to labor.

b.

make loans to businesses, banks, and state and local governments.

c.

outlaw yellow dog (antiunion) contracts.

d.

provide money for construction of dams on the Tennessee River.

e.

lend money for federal public works projects.

53. The Bonus Expeditionary Force marched on Washington, D.C., in 1932 to demand



a.

the removal of American troops from Nicaragua.

b.

an expanded American army and navy.

c.

immediate full payment of bonus payments promised to World War I veterans.

d.

punishment for those who had forced unemployed veterans to leave Washington, D.C.

e.

housing and health care assistance for veterans.

54. President Hoover's public image was severely damaged by his



a.

decision to abandon the principle of rugged individualism.

b.

construction of Hoovervilles for the homeless.

c.

agreement to provide a federal dole to the unemployed.

d.

refusal to do anything to try to solve the Great Depression.

e.

use of harsh military force to disperse the Bonus Army from Washington.

55. The 1932 Stimson doctrine



a.

reversed the United States' long-standing interventionist policy in Latin America.

b.

committed the United States to join the League of Nations' effort to impose economic sanctions against Japan for its invasion of Manchuria.

c.

announced the United States' willingness to outlaw war as an instrument of national policy.

d.

declared that the United States would not recognize any territorial acquisition achieved by force of arms.

e.

declared Japan and Germany rogue states.

APUSH Unit 8 Test

Answer Section
MULTIPLE CHOICE
1. D
2. B
3. E
4. E
5. B
6. B
7. E
8. A
9. C
10. B
11. D
12. B
13. B
14. D
15. B
16. D
17. E
18. B
19. A
20. C
21. E
22. C
23. E
24. B
25. C
26. C
27. D
28. E
29. D
30. A
31. E
32. E
33. C
34. E
35. C
36. E
37. A
38. E
39. D
40. A
41. E
42. B
43. B
44. C
45. A
46. D
47. E
48. E
49. B
50. A
51. D
52. B
53. C
54. E
55. D


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