Apush syllabus Mr. Johnson Hopewell High School Fall 2014 – Spring 2015



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APUSH Syllabus

Mr. Johnson

Hopewell High School

Fall 2014 – Spring 2015

http://apushwithmrjohnson.com



Introduction

Welcome to AP US History (APUSH) at Hopewell High School. This course examines the evolution of the American republic from the initial European incursion into North America to the present. Solid reading and writing skills, along with a willingness to devote considerable time to homework and study, are necessary to succeed.



College Credit

APUSH is meant to be the equivalent of a freshman college survey course. Students can earn college credit by scoring well on the AP exam in May. Some colleges will give credit for a score of 3 on the AP exam, though most require a score of 4 or 5.



Class Website

I have created a website (http://apushwithmrjohnson.weebly.com) with a vast array of materials to support students enrolled in APUSH. Please use this resource on a weekly, if not daily, basis. On my website, you will find:



  • Course calendar – daily classroom agenda detailing activities, assignments and due dates

  • Units – Virtually every PowerPoint, handout, primary source, vocabulary list, and any other material used in class, sorted by unit and by daily lesson

  • Web Resources – Links to other useful websites, including the College Board homepage, where you can find information regarding the AP exam and research APUSH topics

  • Check Your Grade – Link to Parent Connection where you can view your grades for all assignments

  • Extra Credit – opportunities to earn additional points through analysis of news articles, test corrections and reviews of APUSH-related movies

  • Contact Form – Type-able form that sends a message to my email address



Absences

Students who are absent from class will be expected to check the website from home, stay up-to-date on their studies, and be prepared to return to class with all assignments completed on time. If you have problems accessing the internet outside of school, please let me know and we will make other arrangements to support your studies while you are out of school.



Reading

Our textbook is American Pageant, 14th Edition. I encourage students to highlight and write notes in the margins of this textbook. Students will be expected to read and take notes on a full chapter approximately every other class meeting, then take a 10 question quiz in class. In addition, we will be reading many primary source materials, which I will provide to students as the school year unfolds and are also available for download on my website.



Writing & Document Analysis

The central focus of APUSH is helping students to improve their historical writing skills. Specifically, students will learn how to respond to the Free-Response Questions (FRQs) and Document Based Question (DBQ) sections of the AP Exam. Students will be required to complete take-home and in-class essays. Entire class periods are devoted to the return of graded essays, discussion of the most common positive and negative aspects of each set, and the distribution of examples of well-written essays.



Assessments

Each unit will conclude with two assessments. The first assessment will be a standard multiple-choice test. The second will be a project. Project assignments will vary (speeches, debates, mock trials and of course, DBQs and FRQs).



Grading Scale

Nine Weeks Grades Semester Average

Classwork & Homework 30% First Nine Weeks 37.5%

Tests 30% Second Nine Weeks 37.5%

Quizzes 20% Midterm/Final Exam 25%

Projects 20%

Materials

Students will need to bring several materials to class:



  • Notebook paper

  • Pens or pencils

  • Three ring binder (at least 2 inches)

  • Flash drive (optional, but handy if you would like me to provide a copy of any materials such as PowerPoint presentations for review)



Discipline & Dress Code

Students are expected to follow all school rules and the dress code outlined in their student handbooks. Additionally, students should adhere to the school-wide “R4” policy:



  • Respect for yourself

  • Respect for others

  • Respect for property

  • Respect for learning

If any infractions of school or classroom rules occur, the following consequences will result:



  • 1st Offense – Student-teacher conference in hallway

  • 2nd Offense – Parent-teacher-student conference via telephone

  • 3rd Offense – Referral to administrator

  • Severe Offense – Referral to administrator



General Historical Themes

  1. American Diversity: The diversity of the American people and the relationships among different groups. The roles of race, class, ethnicity, and gender in the history of the United States.

  2. American Identity: Views of the American national character and ideas about American exceptionalism. Recognizing regional differences within the context of what it means to be an American.

  3. Culture: Diverse individual and collective expressions through literature, art, philosophy, music, theater, and film throughout U.S. history. Popular culture and the dimensions of cultural conflict within American society.

  4. Demographic Changes: Changes in birth, marriage, and death rates; life expectancy and family patterns; population size and density. The economic, social, and political effects of immigration, internal migration, and migration networks.

  5. Economic Transformations: Changes in trade, commerce, and technology across time. The effects of capitalist development, labor and unions, and consumerism.

  6. Environment: Ideas about the consumption and conservation of natural resources. The impact of population growth, industrialization, pollution, and urban and suburban expansion.

  7. Globalization: Engagement with the rest of the world from the fifteenth century to the present: colonialism, mercantilism, global hegemony, development of markets, imperialism, and cultural exchange.

  8. Politics and Citizenship: Colonial and revolutionary legacies, American political traditions, growth of democracy, and the development of the modern state. Defining citizenship; struggles for civil rights.

  9. Reform: Diverse movements focusing on a broad range of issues, including anti-slavery, education, labor, temperance, women’s rights, civil rights, gay rights, war, public health, and government.

  10. Religion: The variety of religious beliefs and practices in America from prehistory to the twenty-first century; influence of religion on politics, economics, and society.

  11. Slavery and Its Legacies in North America: Systems of slave labor and other forms of unfree labor (e.g., indentured servitude, contract labor) in American Indian societies, the Atlantic World, and the American South and West. The economics of slavery and its racial dimensions. Patterns of resistance and the long-term economic, political, and social effects of slavery.

  12. War and Diplomacy: Armed conflict from the precolonial period to the twenty-first century; impact of war on American foreign policy and on politics, economy, and society.



Course Theme: The “Empire of Liberty”

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1a/emanuel_leutze_-_westward_the_course_of_empire_takes_its_way_-_smithsonian.jpg
Thomas Jefferson described the United States as an “Empire of Liberty.” He believed that the young nation was destined to spread its influence far beyond the original 13 colonies, and with that growth would spread the ideals of equality, freedom, and economic opportunity for all.
We will revisit Jefferson’s concept of the “Empire of Liberty” throughout the year, considering the following questions along the way:

  • How has the U.S. expanded its geographic boundaries?

  • How has the U.S. spread its political, economic and cultural influence beyond its own borders?

  • In what ways do the concepts of “empire” and “liberty” go hand-in-hand? In what ways are the concepts contradictory?

  • How does the concept of the “Empire of Liberty” apply to [insert name of unit currently being studied]?

  • Has American influence been a blessing or a curse for the peoples in lands we have touched?

  • Is the United States truly “exceptional” among the nations of the world?

  • What can learn from our past to guide the future of the “Empire of Liberty”?



Course Calendar


Unit 1: Colonization

Themes

“Empire of Liberty”

American diversity

Demographic changes

Economic transformations

Globalization

Slavery and Its Legacies in North America



Calendar dates (approximate)

September 2nd-September 15th

American Pageant textbook reference

Chapter 1 - New World Beginnings, 33,000 B.C.E.-1769 C.E.

Chapter 2 - The Planting of English North America, 1500-1733

Chapter 3 - Settling the Northern Colonies, 1619-1700

Chapter 4 - American Life in the Seventeenth Century, 1607-1692

Additional Texts & Primary Sources

Annotate documents and use the SOAPSTone analysis tool (speaker, occasion, audience, purpose, subject, tone)

  • Excerpts from the diary of Christopher Columbus

  • John Winthrop – “A City Upon a Hill”

  • Richard Frethorne – Letter to His Parents

  • Chesapeake & New England ship manifests

  • Life expectancy graphs: New England vs. Chesapeake

  • Map of colonial regions

  • New England town map

Historical Scholarship

J.H. Elliot – Empires of the Atlantic World (excerpt)

Writing Assignment

DBQ 1993: New England vs. Chesapeake Colonies

“Although New England and the Chesapeake region were both settled largely by people of English origin, by 1700 the regions had evolved into two distinct societies. Why did this difference in development occur? Use the documents and your knowledge of the colonial period up to 1700 to develop your answer.”

(ID-4, ID-5, PEO-1, PEO-4, PEO-5, POL-1, WXT-1, WOR-1, ENV-2, ENV-4)

APUSH THEME: ENVIRONMENT & GEOGRAPHY (ENV)



Assessment(s)

Multiple Choice Test



Unit 2: The Revolutionary Era

Themes

“Empire of Liberty”

American Identity

Economic Transformations

Globalization

Politics and Citizenship

War and Diplomacy



Calendar dates (approximate)

September 16th-September 29th

American Pageant textbook reference

Chapter 5 - Colonial Society on the Eve of Revolution, 1700-1775

Chapter 6 - The Duel for North America, 1608-1763

Chapter 7 - The Road to Revolution, 1763-1775

Chapter 8 - America Secedes from the Empire, 1775-1783



Primary Sources

Annotate documents and use the SOAPSTone analysis tool (speaker, occasion, audience, purpose, subject, tone)

  • Maps of French & Indian War & Revolutionary War

  • British national debt graph/timeline

  • Colonial exports graph/timeline

  • Benjamin Franklin – 13 Virtues

  • Thomas Jefferson – Declaration of Independence

Historical Scholarship

Gordon S. Wood – The Radicalism of the American Revolution

Writing Assignment

FRQ: Choose one of the following

  • “The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpation, all having, in direct object, the establishment of an absolute tyranny over the states.” Evaluate this accusation against King George III in the Declaration of Independence.

  • “American victory in the war for independence was inevitable.” Assess the validity of this statement.

  • To what degree did the American Revolution bring about social, political and economic change in the former colonies?

(ID-5, POL-1, WOR-2, CUL-2, CUL-4, CUL5)

APUSH THEME: IDEAS, BELIEFS & CULTURE (CUL)



Assessment(s)

Multiple Choice Test



Unit 3: Confederation & Constitution

Themes

American Identity

Politics & Citizenship

Reform


Calendar dates (approximate)

September 30th-October 10th

American Pageant textbook reference

Chapter 9 - The Confederation & the Constitution, 1776-1790

Primary Sources

Annotate documents and use the SOAPSTone analysis tool (speaker, occasion, audience, purpose, subject, tone)

  • Articles of Confederation
    Constitution of the United States

  • Federalist #10

  • Federalist #13

  • Federalist #51

  • Antifederalist #10

  • Antifederalist #16

  • Antifederalist #17

  • Ratification vote map & pie charts for each state

  • Map of electoral college and Congressional apportion by state

Historical Scholarship

Jeffrey Rogers Hummel – “The Constitution as Counterrevolution”

HISTORICAL SCHOLARSHIP DISCUSSION



  • “To what extent was the Constitution a drastic, conservative departure from the Articles of Confederation?”

  • Cite evidence from the texts by Hummel (above) and Wood (from Unit 2)

Writing Assignment

Timed writing (35 minutes) FRQ: “To what extent was the Constitution a drastic, conservative departure from the Articles of Confederation?”

(CUL-2, CUL-4, POL-5)

APUSH THEMATIC LEARNING OBJECTIVE: POLITICS & POWER (POL)


Assessment(s)

Multiple Choice Test




Unit 4: The Virginia Dynasty

Themes

“Empire of Liberty”

American Diversity

American Identity

Culture


Politics and Citizenship

War and Diplomacy



Calendar dates (approximate)

October 13th-October 28th

American Pageant textbook reference

Chapter 10 - Launching the New Ship of State, 1789-1800

Chapter 11 - The Triumphs & Travails of the Jeffersonian Republic, 1800-1812

Chapter 12 - The Second War for Independence and the Upsurge of Nationalism, 1812-1824

Primary Sources

Annotate documents and use the SOAPSTone analysis tool (speaker, occasion, audience, purpose, subject, tone)

  • Electoral College results, 1789-1820

  • Phyllis Wheatley – “Ode to George Washington”

  • George Washington – “Farewell Address”

  • Jefferson & Madison – “Virginia & Kentucky Resolutions”

  • Thomas Jefferson – “First Inaugural Address”

  • Francis Scott Key – “Star-Spangled Banner”

  • Edgar Allan Poe – “The Black Cat”

  • Henry David Thoreau – Walden (excerpt), “On Civil Disobedience”

  • James Fenimore Cooper – The Last of the Mohicans (excerpt)

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne – The Scarlet Letter (excerpt)

  • William Cullen Bryant – “Thanatopsis”

  • Advertisements for minstrel shows

  • Photographs of Neoclassical architecture

  • Paintings by Hudson River School artists, Gilbert Stuart and George Catlin

  • Audobon lithographs

Historical Scholarship

Gordon S. Wood –Empire of Liberty (excerpt)

Writing Assignment

DBQ 1998: Jefferson & Madison

“With respect to the federal Constitution, the Jeffersonian Republicans are usually characterized as strict constructionists who were opposed to the broad constructionism of the Federalists. To what extent was this characterization of the two parties accurate during the presidencies of Jefferson and Madison? In writing your answer, use the documents and your knowledge of the period 1801-1817.”

(ID-1, POL-2, POL-5, POL-6, CUL-2, CUL-5)

APUSH THEMATIC LEARNING OBJECTIVE: POLITICS & POWER (POL)



Assessment(s)

Multiple choice test

Speech: “The Common Good”





Unit 5: Expansion, Reform & Sectionalism

Themes


“Empire of Liberty”

Economic Transformations

Politics and Citizenship

Reform


Religion

Slavery and Its Legacies in North America



Calendar dates (approximate)

October 29th-November 14th

American Pageant textbook reference

  • Chapter 13 - The Rise of a Mass Democracy, 1824-1840

  • Chapter 14 - Forging the National Economy, 1790-1860

  • Chapter 15 - The Ferment of Reform & Culture, 1790-1860

  • Chapter 16 - The South & the Slavery Controversy, 1793-1860

  • Chapter 17 - Manifest Destiny & Its Legacy, 1841-1848

  • Chapter 18 - Renewing the Sectional Struggle, 1848-1854

  • Chapter 19 - Drifting Toward Disunion, 1854-1861

Primary Sources

Annotate documents and use the SOAPSTone analysis tool (speaker, occasion, audience, purpose, subject, tone)

  • Electoral College results, 1824-1860

  • Maps of westward expansion

  • Map of Indian Removal, the Trail of Tears and Oklahoma reservations

  • Political cartoons about Andrew Jackson

  • John L. O’Sullivan – “Manifest Destiny”

  • Southern population pie charts – racial composition of the south

  • Cotton production & export graphs

  • David Walker’s Appeal (excerpt)

  • Elizabeth Cady Stanton & Lucretia Mott – “Seneca Fall Declaration of Sentiments”

  • “Tall Tales”

  • South Carolina Declaration of Causes

  • Abraham Lincoln – “First Inaugural Address”

Historical Scholarship

Richard Hofstadter – The American Political Tradition and the Men Who Made It (excerpt)

HISTORICAL SCHOLARSHIP DISCUSSION:



  • Compare and contrast the historical assessments of Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson in terms of race and slavery, economics and westward expansion

  • Cite arguments and evidence from Hofstadter (above) and Wood (from Unit 4)

Writing Assignment

DBQ 2006: American Women, 1770-1861

Discuss the changing ideals of American womanhood between the American Revolution (1770s) and the Civil War. What factors fostered the emergence of “republican motherhood” and the “cult of domesticity”? Assess the extent to which these ideals influenced the lives of women during this period. In your answer, be sure to consider issues of race and class.”

(WXT-2, WXT-4, WXT-5, PEO-5, POL-3, POL-6, ENV-3, CUL-2, CUL-4, CUL-5)

APUSH THEMATIC LEARNING OBJECTIVE: WORK, EXCHANGE & TECHNOLOGY (WXT)



Assessment(s)

Multiple choice test



Unit 6: Civil War & Reconstruction

Themes


“Empire of Liberty”

American Identity

Economic Transformations

Politics and Citizenship

Slavery and Its Legacies in North America

War and Diplomacy



Calendar dates (approximate)

November 17th-December 3rd

American Pageant textbook reference

Chapter 20 - Girding for War: The North & South, 1861-1865

Chapter 21 - The Furnace of Civil War, 1861-1865

Chapter 22 - The Ordeal of Reconstruction, 1865-1877


Primary Sources

Annotate documents and use the SOAPSTone analysis tool (speaker, occasion, audience, purpose, subject, tone)

  • Electoral College results, 1860-1876

  • Maps of the Civil War & the South under Reconstruction

  • Political cartoons by Thomas Nast

  • Walt Whitman – “Beat! Beat! Drums!,” “O Captain, My Captain!”

  • Abraham Lincoln – “Letter to Mrs. Bixby,” “Gettysburg Address,” “Second Inaugural Address”

  • Civil War casualty figures

Historical Scholarship

Eric Foner – Reconstruction (excerpt)

Writing Assignment

DBQ 2009: African Americans & the Civil War

“In what ways did African Americans shape the course and consequences of the Civil War?”

(ID-2, ID-6, WXT-4, WXT-5, PEO-3, PEO-5, POL-2, POL-3, POL-6, WOR-2, ENV-3, CUL-2, CUL-5)

APUSH THEMATIC LEARNING OBJECTIVE: IDENTITY (ID)



Assessment(s)

Multiple choice test

Seminar discussion on the Civil War & Reconstruction



  1. Abraham Lincoln: Tyrant or defender of freedom?

  2. How did the federal government's role change as a result of the Civil War and Reconstruction?  Consider issues of race relations, economic development and westward expansion.

  3. In what ways did African Americans shape the course and consequences of the Civil War and Reconstruction?



Unit 7: Gilded Age

Themes


“Empire of Liberty”

American Diversity

Demographic Changes

Economic Transformations



Calendar dates (approximate)

December 4th-December 19th

American Pageant textbook reference

Chapter 23 - Political Paralysis in the Gilded Age, 1869-1896

Chapter 24 - Industry Comes of Age, 1865-1900

Chapter 25 - America Moves to the City, 1865-1900

Chapter 26 - The Great West and the Agricultural Revolution, 1865-1896

Primary Sources

Annotate documents and use the SOAPSTone analysis tool (speaker, occasion, audience, purpose, subject, tone)

  • Electoral College results, 1876-1900

  • Helen Hunt Jackson – A Century of Dishonor (excerpt)

  • Bob Marley – “Buffalo Soldier”

  • Horatio Alger – Ragged Dick (excerpt)

  • Andrew Carnegie – “The Gospel of Wealth”

  • Corporate mergers graph/timeline

  • Immigration & urban growth data

  • Anonymous – “Spancill Hill”

Historical Scholarship

Henry M. Littlefield – The Wizard of Oz: Parable on Populism

Writing Assignment

FRQ

“For whom and to what extent was the American West a land of opportunity in the period from 1865 to 1890?”

(ID-2, ID-5, ID-6, ID-7, WXT-2, WXT-3, WXT-4, WXT-5, PEO-1, PEO-2, PEO-3, PEO-4, PEO-5, POL-6, ENV-2, ENV-3, ENV-4, CUL-2, CUL-5)

APUSH THEMATIC LEARNING OBJECTIVE: PEOPLING (PEO)



Assessment(s)

Multiple choice test

Midterm Review Packet & Classroom Presentation





Unit 8: Populism & Progressivism

Themes

Environment

Politics and Citizenship

Reform

Religion


Calendar dates (approximate)

December 20th-January 13th

American Pageant textbook reference

Chapter 28 - Progressivism and the Republican Roosevelt, 1901-1912

Chapter 29 - Wilsonian Progressivism at Home and Abroad, 1912-1916

Primary Sources

Annotate documents and use the SOAPSTone analysis tool (speaker, occasion, audience, purpose, subject, tone)

  • Electoral College results, 1892-1920

  • Joe Hill – “Casey Jones, the Union Scab”

  • Eugene Debs – “What Can We Do for Working People?”

  • Map of Pullman, IL

  • Populist Party – “Omaha Platform”

  • Labor force pie chart: 1870 vs. 1910

  • Upton Sinclair – The Jungle (excerpt)

  • Photographs by Jacob Riis from How the Other Half Lives

Historical Scholarship

Howard Zinn: A People’s History of the United States – Chapter 13: The Socialist Challenge

Writing Assignment

FRQ

“Explain the origins of TWO of the following third parties and evaluate their impact on United States politics and national policies.



  • The People’s Party (Populists), 1892

  • The Progressive Party (Bull Moose Party), 1912

  • The States’ Rights Democratic Party (Dixiecrats), 1948

  • The American Independent Party, 1968”

(ID-2, ID-3, ID-5, ID-6, ID-7, WXT-3, WXT-5, WXT-6, WXT-7, PEO-2, PEO-3, PEO-6, PEO-7, POL-2, POL-3, POL-6, WOR-3, WOR-6, ENV-5, CUL-2, CUL-3, CUL-5, CUL-6)

APUSH THEMATIC LEARNING OBJECTIVE: POLITICS AND POWER (POL)



Assessment(s)

Multiple Choice Test



Unit 9: America on the World Stage

Themes


“Empire of Liberty”

Economic Transformations

Globalization

War and Diplomacy



Calendar dates (approximate)

January 14th-February 4th

American Pageant textbook reference

  • Chapter 27 - Empire & Expansion, 1890-1909

  • (Skip Chapter 28)

  • Chapter 29 - Wilsonian Progressivism at Home and Abroad, 1912-1916

  • Chapter 30 - The War to End War, 1917-1918

Primary Sources

Annotate documents and use the SOAPSTone analysis tool (speaker, occasion, audience, purpose, subject, tone)

  • Electoral College results, 1896-1920

  • John L. O’Sullivan – “Manifest Destiny”
    Rudyard Kipling – “White Man’s Burden”

  • Henry Labouchère – “Brown Man’s Burden”

  • Graph of U.S. imports and exports, 1870-1914

  • Hearst & Pulitzer articles on the explosion of the USS Maine

  • Pablo Neruda – “The United Fruit Company”

  • Song: “Over There”

  • Wilfred Owen – “Dulce Et Decorum Est,” “Anthem for Doomed Youth”

  • Graph of WWI casualties figures by country

  • Woodrow Wilson – “14 Points”

  • Henry Cabot Lodge – “14 Reservations”

  • Eugene Debs – “Address to the Court”

  • A. Mitchell Palmer – “The Case Against the Reds”

Historical Scholarship

Howard Zinn – A People’s History of the United States (excerpt: Chapter 14 – “War is the Health of the State”)

Writing Assignment

FRQ: Choose one of the following

  • “Analyze the extent to which the Spanish-American War was a turning point in American foreign policy.”

  • “Compare the debates that took place over American expansionism in the 1840’s with those that took place in the 1890’s, analyzing the similarities and differences in the debates of the two eras.”

(ID-2, ID-3, WXT-3, WXT-6, WXT-7, POL-6, WOR-3, WOR-5, WOR-6, WOR-7, CUL-5)

APUSH THEMATIC LEARNING OBJECTIVE: AMERICA IN THE WORLD (WOR)



Assessment(s)

Multiple choice test

Newscast presentation





Unit 10: Prosperity, Depression & New Deal

Themes


“Empire of Liberty”

Culture


Demographic Changes

Economic Transformations

Politics and Citizenship

Reform


Religion

Calendar dates (approximate)

February 5th-February 24th

American Pageant textbook reference

Chapter 31 - American Life in the "Roaring Twenties," 1919-1929

Chapter 32 - The Politics of Boom and Bust, 1920-1932

Chapter 33 - The Great Depression and the New Deal, 1933-1939


Primary Sources

Annotate documents and use the SOAPSTone analysis tool (speaker, occasion, audience, purpose, subject, tone)

  • Electoral College results, 1920-1944

  • F. Scott Fitzgerald – The Great Gatsby

  • Scopes trial transcript – Clarence Darrow cross-examines William Jennings Bryan

  • Dorothea Lange – Dust Bowl photographs

  • Huey Long – “Every Man a King”

  • Graph of federal income tax brackets, 1912-2008

  • Graph of tariff rates, 1900-2000

  • John Maynard Keynes – “Letter to Franklin Roosevelt”

  • Graph of Dow Jones average, 1927-1945

  • Franklin D. Roosevelt – “First Inaugural Address,” “Fireside Chat on the Banking Crisis”

  • “The CCC: What It Is and What It Does”

Historical Scholarship

W. E. Leuchtenberg, Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal (excerpt)

B. J. Bernstein, Towards a New Past: Dissenting Essays in American History (excerpt)

A.J. Badger, The New Deal: The Depression Years, 1933-1940 (excerpt)


Writing Assignment

DBQ 2003: The New Deal

“Analyze the responses of Franklin Roosevelt’s administration to the problems of the Great Depression. How effective were these responses? How did they change the role of the federal government?”

(ID-7, ID-8, WXT-3, WXT-5, WXT-6, WXT-7, WXT-8, PEO-3, PEO-6, POL-2, POL-3, POL-4, POL-5, POL-6, POL-7, WOR-3, ENV-5, CUL-5, CUL-6, CUL-7)

APUSH THEMATIC LEARNING OBJECTIVE: WORK, EXCHANGE & TECHNOLOGY (WXT)



Assessment(s)

Multiple choice test

New Deal mock trial





Unit 11: World War II

Themes

“Empire of Liberty”

American Diversity

Economic Transformations

War and Diplomacy



Calendar dates (approximate)

February 25th-

March 10th



American Pageant textbook reference

Chapter 34 - Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Shadow of War, 1933-1941

Chapter 35 - America in World War II, 1941-1945



Primary Sources

Annotate documents and use the SOAPSTone analysis tool (speaker, occasion, audience, purpose, subject, tone)

  • Maps of World War II

  • Dr. Seuss – War propaganda cartoons

  • The Atlantic Charter

  • Franklin D. Roosevelt – “Pearl Harbor Address”

  • U.S. Bombing Survey – “Effects of the Atomic Bomb”

  • WWII casualty figures by country

  • WWII POW death rates by theater/front

  • Studs Terkel – The Good War (excerpts)

Historical Scholarship

Peter Irons – A People’s History of the Supreme Court (excerpt: Ch. 27 – “A Jap’s a Jap”)

Writing Assignment

FRQ: Choose one of the following

  • To what extent and why did the United States adopt an isolationist policy in the 1920s and 1930s?

  • Analyze the homefront experience of TWO of the following groups during the Second World War.

African Americans

Japanese Americans

Jewish Americans

Mexican Americans

(ID-6, ID-7, ID-8, WXT-7, WXT-8, PEO-3, PEO-6, PEO-7, POL-3, POL-7, WOR-3, WOR-4, WOR-6, WOR-7, CUL-5, CUL-6, CUL-7)

APUSH THEMATIC LEARNING OBJECTIVE: AMERICA IN THE WORLD (WOR) OR IDEAS, BELIEFS AND CULTURE (CUL)



Assessment(s)

Multiple choice test



Unit 12: Early Cold War

Themes

“Empire of Liberty”

American Identity

Economic Transformations

Globalization

Politics and Citizenship

War and Diplomacy



Calendar dates (approximate)

March 13th-March 26th

American Pageant textbook reference

Chapter 36 - The Cold War Begins, 1945-1952

Chapter 37 - The Eisenhower Era, 1952-1960

Chapter 38 - The Stormy Sixties, 1960-1968


Primary Sources

Annotate documents and use the SOAPSTone analysis tool (speaker, occasion, audience, purpose, subject, tone)

  • Electoral College results, 1948-1960

  • Pie charts of U.S. military spending as proportion of federal budget, 1940-1990

  • Graph of per capita income in North Korea vs. South Korea, 1950-2000

  • Maps of U.S. involvement in the Cold War

  • Joseph McCarthy – “Speech at Wheeling, West Virginia”

  • Margaret Chase Smith – “Declaration of Conscience”

  • Arthur Miller – “Why I Wrote the Crucible”

  • Harry Truman – “The Truman Doctrine”

  • National Security Council – “NSC-68”

  • Dwight Eisenhower – “Farewell Address”

Historical Scholarship

John Lewis Gaddis – The Cold War: A New History (excerpt)

Writing Assignment

DBQ

“What were the Cold War fears of the American people in the aftermath of the Second World War? How successfully did the Dwight Eisenhower administration address those fears?”

(ID-3, ID-6, ID-8, WXT-8, PEO-6, POL-2, POL-3, POL-4, POL-6, POL-7, WOR-3, WOR-4, WOR-7, CUL-5, CUL-6, CUL-7)

APUSH THEMATIC LEARNING OBJECTIVE: POLITICS & POWER (POL)



Assessment(s)

Multiple choice test



Unit 13: People’s Movements

Themes

“Empire of Liberty”

American Diversity

Culture

Demographic Changes



Environment

Politics and Citizenship

Reform

Slavery and Its Legacies in North America



Calendar dates (approximate)

March 27th-April 14th

American Pageant textbook reference

Chapter 36 - The Cold War Begins, 1945-1952

Chapter 37 - The Eisenhower Era, 1952-1960

Chapter 38 - The Stormy Sixties, 1960-1968

Chapter 39 - The Stalemated Seventies, 1968-1980

Chapter 40 - The Resurgence of Conservatism, 1980-1992


Primary Sources

Annotate documents and use the SOAPSTone analysis tool (speaker, occasion, audience, purpose, subject, tone)

  • Graph of consumer credit, 1945-1960

  • Betty Friedan – The Feminine Mystique (excerpt)

  • Phyllis Schlafly – “Report on the Equal Rights Amendment”

  • Mario Savio – “Put Your Bodies Upon the Gears”

  • Students for a Democratic Society – “Port Huron Statement” (excerpt)

  • Artwork: Pop Art

  • Martin Luther King – “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” “I Have a Dream,” “Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break the Silence”

  • Malcolm X – “The Ballot or the Bullet”

  • Indians of All Nations – “To the Great White Father and All His People”

  • Cesar Chavez – “Address to the Commonwealth Club”

  • Vito Russo – “Why We Fight”

  • Rachel Carson – Silent Spring (excerpt)

  • Graph of energy consumption, 1780-2000

  • Ralph Nader – Unsafe at Any Speed (excerpt)

Historical Scholarship

Todd Gitlin – The Sixties: Years of Hope, Days of Rage (excerpt)

David Horowitz – Radical Son: A Generational Odyssey (excerpt)

HISTORICAL SCHOLARSHIP DISCUSSION:


  • Compare and contrast Gitlin’s and Horowitz’s assessments of the goals, methods, achievements, failures of the youth counterculture movement of the 1960s and 1970s.

  • To what extent have their views changed over time as they have aged and reflected on their involvement?

  • With whom do you agree in the assessment of the counterculture movement?

Writing Assignment

FRQ 2005: You must respond to the following prompt

“Analyze the extent to which TWO of the following transformed American society in the 1960s and 1970s.

The Civil Rights movement

The antiwar movement

The women’s movement”

(ID-3, ID-7, ID-8, POL-2, POL-3, POL-4, POL-6, POL-7, WOR-4, CUL-5, CUL-6, CUL-7)

APUSH THEMATIC LEARNING OBJECTIVE: IDEAS, BELIEFS & CULTURE (CUL)


Assessment(s)

Multiple choice test

Compose your own social movement song





Unit 14: Late Cold War

Themes

“Empire of Liberty”

American Identity

Economic Transformations

Globalization

Politics and Citizenship

War and Diplomacy



Calendar dates (approximate)

April 15th-April 24th

American Pageant textbook reference

Chapter 38 - The Stormy Sixties, 1960-1968

Chapter 39 - The Stalemated Seventies, 1968-1980

Chapter 40 - The Resurgence of Conservatism, 1980-1992


Primary Sources

Annotate documents and use the SOAPSTone analysis tool (speaker, occasion, audience, purpose, subject, tone)

  • Electoral College results, 1964-1988

  • Michael Harrington – The Other America (excerpt)

  • Phil Ochs – “Draft Dodger Rag”

  • Creedence Clearwater Revival – “Fortunate Son”

  • Marvin Gaye – “What’s Goin’ On”

  • Vietnam War casualty figures

  • Film excerpt: Hearts & Minds

  • Richard Nixon – “Silent Majority” speech

  • Graph/timeline of oil prices, 1960-1990

  • Gerald Ford – “Pardon”

  • Jimmy Carter – “Crisis of Confidence”

  • Ronald Reagan – “Evil Empire” speech

Historical Scholarship

Daniel Ellsberg – Secrets: A Memoir of Vietnam and the Pentagon Papers

Writing Assignment

DBQ (choose one)

  • “In what ways did the administration of Lyndon Johnson respond to the political, economic and social problems of the United States? Assess the effectiveness of these responses.”

  • “Analyze the international and domestic challenges the United States faced between 1968 and 1974, and evaluate how President Richard Nixon’s administration responded to them.”

(ID-6, ID-7, ID-8, WXT-8, PEO-2, PEO-7, POL-2, POL-3, POL-4, POL-5, POL-6, POL-7, WOR-4, WOR-7, ENV-5, CUL-5, CUL-6, CUL-7)

APUSH THEMATIC LEARNING OBJECTIVE: POLITICS & POWER (POL)



Assessment(s)

Multiple Choice Test



Unit 15: Into the Twenty-First Century

Themes

“Empire of Liberty”

American Identity

Economic Transformations

Environment

Globalization

Politics and Citizenship



Calendar dates (approximate)

April 27th-April 30th

American Pageant textbook reference

Chapter 41 - America Confronts the Post-Cold War Era, 1992-2004

Chapter 42 - The American People Face a New Century



Primary Sources

Annotate documents and use the SOAPSTone analysis tool (speaker, occasion, audience, purpose, subject, tone)

  • Electoral College results, 1992-2012

  • Graph of CEO pay vs. employee wages, 1973-2004

  • National debt timeline/graph, 1970-2012

  • Current world map

  • Bill Clinton and George H.W. Bush – 1992 Presidential Debate #1

  • Louis Johnston – “Bill Gates the Robber Baron”

  • George W. Bush – “State of the Union Address, 2002”

  • Hans Blix – “Iraq Ten Years Later”

  • Barack Obama – “2004 Address to the DNC”

Historical Scholarship

Benjamin Barber – Jihad vs. McWorld (excerpt)

Francis Fukuyama – The End of History (excerpt)

HISTORICAL SCHOLARSHIP DISCUSSION:


  • Compare and contrast the views of Barber and Fukuyama on the significance of the end of the Cold War and the dawn of the new millennium

  • Cite arguments and evidence from both Barber and Fukuyama

Writing Assignment

FRQ: You must respond to the following prompt

“Describe the patterns of immigration in TWO of the periods below. Compare and contrast the responses of Americans to immigrants in these periods.

1820 to 1860

1880 to 1924

1965 to 2000”

(ID-1, ID-3, ID-6, WXT-2, WXT-3, WXT-4, WXT-5, PEO-2, PEO-3, PEO-5, PEO-6, PEO-7, POL-2, POL-3, POL-4, POL-6, POL-7, WOR-3, WOR-6, CUL-2, CUL-5, CUL-6, CUL-7)

APUSH THEME: ALL THEMES!


Assessment(s)

Multiple choice test




Unit 16: AP Exam Prep

Review

May 1st-May 7th

AP Exam

May 8, 2015

  • 80 multiple choice

  • One DBQ

  • Two FRQs




Unit 17: Enrichment

Review for Virginia & U.S. History SOL

SOL test date TBA

Enrichment Activities

Visit my website (http://apushwithmrjohnson.weebly.com) and complete the assignments for two topics:

  • Topic A: Debt & Spending

  • Topic B: The Melting Pot

  • Topic C: The Environment

  • Topic D: Health & Healthcare

  • Topic E: Crime, Law Enforcement & Prisons

  • Topic F: Terrorism & Foreign Policy

  • Topic G: Security, Secrecy & Leaks

  • Topic H: The Future of Technology

Seminar Discussion

Tracing and evaluating Jefferson’s “Empire of Liberty”



AP Exam

The AP exam will be administered on May 8th. The exam consists of four sections:



  • Section I: Multiple choice (35 minutes)

    • 35 to 40 multiple choice questions with five answer choices each

    • Questions will be grouped into sets, with multiple questions referring to the same primary source, secondary source or other historical issue.

  • Section II: Short answer (50 minutes)

    • Four topics, each with a series of questions to be answered in a paragraph

  • Section III: Long answer essay (70 minutes)

    • Two essay prompts on the period 1492-1865 (choose one)

    • Two essay prompts on the period 1865-present (choose one)

  • Section IV: Document Based Question (60 minutes)

    • 15 minutes to read the essay prompt and documents, then plan your essay

    • 45 minutes to write your essay

    • The DBQ may cover any time period from 1492-present


SOL Test

All students must also take and pass the SOL test for Virginia & U.S. History a few weeks after they take the AP exam. The test will consist of approximately 70 multiple choice questions. Students must score a 400 to be considered “Proficient” and a 500 to score “Advanced Proficient.” A perfect score is a 600.



How to Contact Me

In addition to sending home progress reports, I plan to call parents a few times a semester to talk on a one-on-one basis. In the meantime, if you would like to contact me, I can be reached by phone at H.H.S. (804.541.6402) by email (jjohnson@hopewell.k12.va.us), or by the “Contact Me” form on my website. I am located in Room 205 and invite parents and/or guardians to stop by anytime to introduce themselves, discuss a child's academic progress, and volunteer for in-school activities.


I look forward to an exciting and productive semester!
Sincerely,

John Johnson



Hopewell High School
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