Apush ch. 28 & 29 Quiz Multiple Choice



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APUSH Ch. 28 & 29 Quiz
Multiple Choice

Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

1. Progressivism

a.

was closely tied to the feminist movement and women's causes.

b.

offered little to the growing women's movement.

c.

supported better treatment of women but not women's suffrage.

d.

saw racial issues as more important than women's issues.

e.

reflected the views of working-class women.

2. The religious movement that was closely linked to progressivism was



a.

the Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations.

b.

the missionary movement.

c.

conservative evangelicalism.

d.

the Social Gospel.

e.

the Catholic Action movement.

3. Match each early-twentieth-century muckraker below with

the target of his or her exposé.


A.

David G. Phillips

1.

the United States Senate

B.

Ida Tarbell

2.

Standard Oil Company

C.

Lincoln Steffens

3.

city governments

D.

Ray Stannard Baker

4.

the condition of blacks




a.

A-1, B-2, C-3, D-4

b.

A-4, B-2, C-3, D-1

c.

A-3, B-1, C-2, D-4

d.

A-3, B-2, C-4, D-1

e.

A-1, B-4, C-2, D-3

4. Most muckrakers believed that their primary function in the progressive attack on social ills was to



a.

formulate a consistent philosophy of social reform.

b.

explain the causes of social ills.

c.

devise solutions to society's problems.

d.

make the public aware of social problems.

e.

link up with movements for social justice.

5. Political progressivism



a.

made little difference in American life.

b.

died out shortly after Teddy Roosevelt stepped down as president.

c.

emerged in both major parties, in all regions, at all levels of government.

d.

was more a minority movement than a majority mood.

e.

began in Northeastern big cities.

6. The Seventeenth Amendment to the Constitution was a key progressive reform designed to



a.

end the corrupt and family-destroying influence of the liquor industry.

b.

make the Senate millionaire's club directly elected by the people.

c.

prohibit child labor.

d.

guarantee the secret Australian ballot in all federal elections.

e.

enable the President to be elected directly by the people rather than by the Electoral College.

7. To regain the power that the people had lost to the interests, progressives advocated all of the following except



a.

initiative.

b.

referendum.

c.

recall.

d.

socialism.

e.

direct election of U.S. senators.

8. The settlement house and women's club movements were crucial centers of female progressive activity because they



a.

provided literary and philosophical perspectives on social questions.

b.

broke down the idea that women had special concerns as wives and mothers.

c.

introduced many middle-class women to a broader array of urban social problems and civic concerns.

d.

helped slum children learn to read Dante and Shakespeare.

e.

became the launching pads for women seeking political office.

9. In Muller v. Oregon, the Supreme Court upheld the principle promoted by progressives like Florence Kelley and Louis Brandeis that



a.

child labor under the age of fourteen should be prohibited.

b.

the federal government should regulate occupational safety and health.

c.

women's factory labor should be limited to ten hours a day five days a week.

d.

female workers should receive equal pay for equal work.

e.

female workers required special rules and protection on the job.

10. The case of Lochner v. New York represented a setback for progressives and labor advocates because in its ruling, the Supreme Court



a.

declared a law limiting work to ten hours a day unconstitutional.

b.

declared unconstitutional a law providing special protection for women workers.

c.

declared that prohibiting child labor would require a constitutional amendment.

d.

upheld the constitutionality of a law enabling business to fire labor organizers.

e.

ruled that fire and safety regulations were local and not state or federal concerns.

11. While president, Theodore Roosevelt chose to label his reform proposals as the



a.

Fair Deal.

b.

Big Deal.

c.

Big Stick.

d.

New Deal.

e.

Square Deal.

12. As a part of his reform program, Teddy Roosevelt advocated all of the following except



a.

guaranteed recognition of labor unions.

b.

federal regulation of corporations.

c.

consumer protection.

d.

conservation of natural resources.

e.

federal regulation of railroad rates and an end to shipping rebates.

13. Teddy Roosevelt helped to end the 1902 strike in the anthracite coal mines by



a.

using the military to force the miners back to work.

b.

passing legislation making the miners' union illegal.

c.

helping the mine owners to import strike-breakers.

d.

appealing to mine owners' and workers' sense of the public interest.

e.

threatening to seize the mines and to operate them with federal troops.

14. Teddy Roosevelt believed that large corporate trusts



a.

had to all be busted up if the American economy were to thrive.

b.

were essential to American national power and economic growth.

c.

were simply too powerful to be broken up or regulated.

d.

were bad only if they acted as monopolies against the public interest.

e.

should be balanced by strong labor unions.

15. The real purpose of Teddy Roosevelt's assault on trusts was to



a.

fragment the political power of big business.

b.

prove that the democratic federal government, not private business, governed the United States.

c.

halt the trend toward combination and integration in business.

d.

establish himself as a bigger trustbuster than William Howard Taft.

e.

inspire confidence in small business owners.

16. President Roosevelt believed that the federal government should adopt a policy of ____ trusts.



a.

dissolving

b.

ignoring

c.

regulating

d.

collusion with

e.

monitoring

17. Passage of the Federal Meat Inspection Act was inspired by the publication of



a.

Theodore Dreiser's The Titan.

b.

Jack London's The Call of the Wild.

c.

Henry Demarest Lloyd's Wealth Against Commonwealth.

d.

Jacob Riis's How the Other Half Lives.

e.

Upton Sinclair's The Jungle.

18. The western preservationists suffered their worst political setback when



a.

California refused to control suburban sprawl into fragile mountain and desert areas.

b.

private developers were allowed to cut off public access to the Pacific Coast beaches.

c.

the city of Los Angeles built canals to bring water from the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

d.

the Yosemite National Park was opened to motor vehicles.

e.

California's Hetch Hetchy Valley was dammed to supply water to San Francisco.

19. Teddy Roosevelt weakened himself politically after his election in 1904 when he



a.

got into a quarrel with his popular secretary of war, William Taft.

b.

refused to do anything in response to the Roosevelt Panic.

c.

supported the Federal Reserve Act.

d.

began to reduce his trust-busting activity.

e.

announced that he would not be a candidate for a third term as president.

20. The Panic of 1907 exposed the need for substantial reform in



a.

U.S. banking and currency policies.

b.

tariff policies.

c.

water and land-use protection.

d.

the practice of corporate interlocking directorates.

e.

Wall Street stock-trading

21. Theodore Roosevelt is probably most accurately described as a(n)



a.

ardent defender of American individualism.

b.

near-socialist.

c.

middle-of-the-road reformer.

d.

champion trustbuster.

e.

political elitist.

22. While president, Theodore Roosevelt



a.

enhanced the power and prestige of the presidency.

b.

displayed little skill in getting his legislation through Congress.

c.

relied more on insider political skills than on public opinion.

d.

was highly popular with the business community.

e.

held rigidly to ideological principles.

23. As president, William Howard Taft



a.

was a good judge of public opinion.

b.

held together the diverse wings of the Republican party.

c.

was wedded more to the status quo than to progressive change.

d.

adopted a confrontational attitude toward Congress.

e.

carried on the legacy of Theodore Roosevelt.

24. President Taft's foreign policy was dubbed



a.

big-stick diplomacy.

b.

the Open Door policy.

c.

the Good Neighbor policy.

d.

dollar diplomacy.

e.

sphere-of-influence diplomacy.

25. Teddy Roosevelt decided to run for the presidency in 1912 because



a.

William Howard Taft had seemed to discard Roosevelt's progressive policies.

b.

Taft decided not to run for a second term.

c.

Woodrow Wilson appeared to be a very strong Democratic candidate.

d.

Senator Robert La Follette encouraged him to do so.

e.

the Democratic party was split.

26. Immediately before he was elected president in 1912, Woodrow Wilson had been serving as



a.

a Presbyterian minister.

b.

the governor of New Jersey.

c.

a successful businessman.

d.

the president of Yale University.

e.

United States Senator from New Jersey.

27. In 1912, Woodrow Wilson ran for the presidency on a Democratic platform that included all of the following except a call for



a.

antitrust legislation.

b.

banking reform.

c.

dollar diplomacy.

d.

tariff reductions.

e.

support for small business.

28. The 1912 presidential election was notable because



a.

it gave the voters a clear choice of political and economic philosophies.

b.

personalities were the only issue of the campaign.

c.

it was the first time women had the right to vote.

d.

the Democratic party had split.

e.

the fourth-party Socialists had a serious chance to win.

29. Match each 1912 presidential candidate below with his political party.




A.

Woodrow Wilson

1.

Socialist

B.

Theodore Roosevelt

2.

Democratic

C.

William Howard Taft

3.

Republican

D.

Eugene V. Debs

4.

Progressive




a.

A-1, B-2, C-4, D-3

b.

A-1, B-3, C-4, D-2

c.

A-4, B-3, C-2, D-l

d.

A-3, B-1, C-2, D-4

e.

A-2, B-4, C-3, D-l

30. Woodrow Wilson's attitude toward the masses can best be described as



a.

open contempt.

b.

fear that they could be easily led astray.

c.

having strong faith in them if they were properly educated and led.

d.

indifference.

e.

trust in their natural common sense.

31. In 1913, Woodrow Wilson broke with a custom dating back to Jefferson's day when he



a.

stopped having formal cabinet meetings.

b.

appointed a black man to the Supreme Court.

c.

endorsed woman suffrage.

d.

personally delivered his presidential State of the Union address to Congress.

e.

rode with his defeated predecessor to the inauguration.

32. When Woodrow Wilson became president in 1912, the most serious shortcoming in the country's financial structure was that



a.

federal paper money was not backed by sound gold or silver.

b.

unsound banks regularly issued inflated bank notes that had to serve as currency.

c.

the banking system was too heavily regulated by the federal government.

d.

the U.S. dollar was rigidly tied to gold.

e.

money for lending was inelastic and heavily concentrated in New York City.

33. Besides lowering tariff rates, the Underwood Tariff Act reflected Wilson's progressive goals by



a.

establishing the first graduated federal income tax.

b.

creating an optional retirement system for workers.

c.

guaranteeing equal treatment for men and women in employment.

d.

using the tariff only for revenue and not to protect American industry from competition.

e.

providing protection for American farmers against subsidized foreign crop imports.

34. The Sixteenth Amendment to the Constitution permitted Congress to enact



a.

a personal income tax.

b.

the direct election of senators.

c.

prohibition of alcohol.

d.

women's suffrage.

e.

the abolition of child labor.

35. The Federal Reserve Act of 1913 guaranteed a substantial measure of public control over the American banking and currency system through the great authority given to



a.

the secretary of the treasury.

b.

the president of the United States.

c.

the House Ways and Means Committee and the Senate Banking Committee.

d.

regional Federal Reserve banks.

e.

the presidentially appointed Federal Reserve Board.

36. The Federal Reserve Act gave the Federal Reserve Board the authority to



a.

issue paper money and increase or decrease the amount of money in circulation by altering interest rates.

b.

close weak banks.

c.

take the U.S. dollar off the gold standard.

d.

collect income taxes directly from employees' paychecks.

e.

guarantee individual banking deposits against bank failures.

37. The Federal Trade Commission was established in 1914 to address all of these practices except



a.

eliminating unfair and discriminatory trade practices.

b.

outlawing unfair business competition and bribery.

c.

sale of stocks without full disclosure of a business's organization and profits.

d.

prohibiting false and misleading advertising.

e.

outlawing the mislabeling or adulterating of products.

38. The central provisions of the Clayton Anti-Trust Act



a.

included trade unions under the antimonopoly provisions of the Sherman Anti-Trust Act.

b.

declared that no single corporation could control more than 75 percent of a given industry.

c.

established minimum wage rates for goods produced in interstate commerce.

d.

outlawed corporate interlocking directorates and price discrimination against different purchasers.

e.

exempted farm cooperatives from antitrust action.

39. Besides prohibiting anticompetitive business practices, the Clayton Anti-Trust Act broke new ground by



a.

exempting labor unions and agricultural cooperatives from antitrust prosecution.

b.

exempting organized major-league baseball from antitrust prosecution.

c.

prohibiting colleges and universities from cooperating to establish tuition and fees.

d.

permitting American businesses to form monopolies when operating overseas.

e.

creating a federal incorporation law for large businesses.

40. The first Jewish member of the United States Supreme Court, appointed by Woodrow Wilson, was



a.

Felix Frankfurter.

b.

Arsene Pujo.

c.

Abraham Cahan.

d.

Louis D. Brandeis.

e.

Bernard Baruch.

41. Woodrow Wilson showed the limits of his progressivism by



a.

opposing workingmen's compensation.

b.

opposing the entry of women into politics.

c.

vetoing the Federal Farm Loan Act.

d.

refusing to appoint the Jewish Louis D. Brandeis to the Federal Trade Commission.

e.

accelerating the segregation of blacks in the federal bureaucracy.

42. Woodrow Wilson's early efforts to conduct a strongly anti-imperialist U. S. foreign policy were first undermined when he



a.

dispatched U.S. military forces to protect American interests in China.

b.

told the Filipinos that they could not obtain their independence for at least forty years.

c.

sent American marines to Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

d.

sent the U.S. Navy to seize the Virgin Islands from Denmark.

e.

began constructing a massive U.S. Navy base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

43. Which term best characterizes Woodrow Wilson's fundamental approach to American foreign policy?



a.

Imperialistic

b.

Moralistic

c.

Realistic

d.

Balance-of-power

e.

Isolationist

44. Which of the following American passenger liners was sunk by German submarines?



a.

Lusitania

b.

Arabic

c.

Sussex

d.

All of these American ships were sunk.

e.

None of these were American ships.

45. In the Sussex pledge, Germany promised



a.

not to sink passenger ships.

b.

to maintain the territorial integrity of France.

c.

to halt its naval blockade of Britain.

d.

to halt all submarine warfare.

e.

not to sink passenger ships without warning.

46. President Wilson's first direct use of American military forces in revolutionary Mexico occurred when he



a.

sent armed forces to protect against Mexico's nationalization of American businesses.

b.

sent the army to prevent Venustiano Carranza from becoming president of Mexico.

c.

seized the Mexican port of Vera Cruz to prevent German delivery of arms to President Huerta.

d.

sent the army to protect the vast ranch of newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst.

e.

sent General Pershing to capture Pancho Villa after Villa staged raids into New Mexico.

47. Before his first term ended, Woodrow Wilson had militarily intervened in or purchased all of the following countries except



a.

Haiti.

b.

the Dominican Republic.

c.

the Virgin Islands.

d.

Cuba.

e.

Mexico.

48. Woodrow Wilson's administration refused to extend formal diplomatic recognition to the government in Mexico headed by



a.

Porfirio Diaz.

b.

Venustiano Carranza.

c.

Pancho Villa.

d.

Victoriano Huerta.

e.

Emiliano Zapata.

49. As World War I began in Europe, the alliance system placed Germany and Austria-Hungary as leaders of the ____, while Russia and France were among the ____.



a.

Central Powers; Holy Alliance

b.

Central Powers; Triple Alliance

c.

Allies; Central Powers

d.

Triple Alliance; Central Powers

e.

Central Powers; Allies

50. With the outbreak of World War I in 1914, the great majority of Americans



a.

earnestly hoped to stay out of the war.

b.

favored entering the war in support of the Allies.

c.

supported the Central Powers.

d.

wanted to form a military alliance of neutral nations.

e.

favored U.S. mediation of the conflict.

51. One primary effect of World War I on the United States was that it



a.

opened new markets in Germany and Austria-Hungary.

b.

suffered severe business losses.

c.

conducted an immense amount of trade with the Allies.

d.

turned more of its economic activity toward Latin America and Asia.

e.

virtually ended American international trade.

52. President Wilson insisted that he would hold ____ to "strict accountability" for ____.



a.

Britain; repaying the loans made to it by American bankers

b.

Britain; the disruption of American trade with the European continent

c.

Germany; starting the war

d.

Germany; fair treatment of civilians in Belgium

e.

Germany; the loss of American ships and lives to submarine warfare

53. German submarines began sinking unarmed and unresisting merchant and passenger ships without warning



a.

when the United States entered the war.

b.

in retaliation for the British naval blockade of Germany.

c.

in an effort to keep the United States out of the war.

d.

because international law now allowed this new style of warfare.

e.

in a last-ditch effort to win the war.

54. The Progressive Bull Moose party died when



a.

Teddy Roosevelt refused to run as the party's presidential candidate in 1916.

b.

Teddy Roosevelt lost the presidential race in 1916.

c.

the United States entered World War I.

d.

the Republican candidate, Charles Evans Hughes, advocated the same programs as Roosevelt.

e.

Woodrow Wilson won over most Bull Moose voters.

55. When Woodrow Wilson won reelection in 1916, he received strong support from the



a.

East Coast.

b.

working class and former Progressive Bull Moose party members.

c.

business community.

d.

prowar members of both parties.

e.

new women voters.

APUSH Ch. 28 & 29 Quiz

Answer Section
MULTIPLE CHOICE
1. A
2. D
3. A
4. D
5. C
6. B
7. D
8. C
9. E
10. A
11. E
12. A
13. E
14. D
15. B
16. C
17. E
18. E
19. E
20. A
21. C
22. A
23. C
24. D
25. A
26. B
27. C
28. A
29. E
30. C
31. D
32. E
33. A
34. A
35. E
36. A
37. C
38. D
39. A
40. D
41. E
42. C
43. B
44. E
45. E
46. C
47. D
48. D
49. E
50. A
51. C
52. E
53. B
54. A
55. B


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