Applied voice



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TENNESSEE STATE UNIVERSITY
DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC


APPLIED VOICE

(MUSC 1400-4401)
Only the music of the highest intellectual and emotional quality is worth the time, money, and effort of presentation. Actually, only music of this quality is of interest; only this music makes any contribution to community and individual life. It is possible, within a framework of excellence to find variety. There is no variety in mediocrity.”
Robert Shaw

This handbook contains information for voice students regarding policies and procedures of the Vocal Division. Be sure to check with your teacher, if you have any questions. You will find additional time-sensitive information posted in your teacher’s studio.



COURSE OBJECTIVE

The focus of vocal instruction is a thorough development in all phases of technique, style, musicianship, interpretation, and repertoire. Students begin at an assessed level of competence and work toward attaining level 4400 including the performance of a voice recital (or senior performance project for Commercial Music majors) in the senior year. Liberal Arts and Music Education majors will prepare a half recital to be performed in the junior year.


As a result of this course sequence students should be able to:


  1. Demonstrate correct fundamentals of tone production – proper breath support; free tone; resonant, pleasant tone quality, pure vowel sounds and clear diction.

  2. Demonstrate through performing an understanding of the basic concepts and constructs of the English, Italian, German and French languages. Demonstrate a more sophisticated knowledge of the aforementioned languages and their poetic interpretive styles during their upper class years.

  3. Exhibit improved performance skills, including those of tone quality, intonation, articulation, interpretation, expressive dynamic contrast, expressive and varied tone color, and legato and sostenuto style.

  4. Gain familiarity with and begin to incorporate the various ornamentation styles and skills appropriate to Baroque, Classical and Early Romantic music. Understand and apply those styles to Jazz, Pop and Broadway styles of the 20th century.

  5. Gain familiarity with musical and pedagogical literature. Develop an understanding of appropriate sound and style through exhaustive listening and reading.

  6. If a Music Education major, be able to demonstrate the application of those skills in the teaching of others.

  7. Acquire and apply appropriate strategies for dealing with performance stress and anxiety.



COURSE REQUIREMENTS

All lessons must be well-prepared. The suggested minimum practice time is one hour per day (Two 30-minute increments if possible.). Organize your practice time so that you have at least 20 minutes of vocalizing and then work on your repertoire.


Always bring a notebook for keeping track of information, assignments, vocal exercises, etc.
You are expected to write in and learn the Word-By-Word translations for your repertoire. Copies of the Word-By-Word translation books, as well as language dictionaries, are available for use in the university library.
There will be other recommended performances TBA throughout the year. There will also be written and listening assignments TBA throughout the year.
Required text:

Jones, Smith, and Walls, Pronouncing Guide to French, German, Italian, Spanish, Carl Fischer, 1945.


Recommended texts:

Coffin, Berton, Phonetic Readings of Songs and Arias, Metuchen, N.J: The Scarecrow Press, 1985.

Concone, J., Thirty Daily Exercises, New York, N.Y: G. Schirmer, Inc.

Melzi, Robert C., The Bantam New College Italian/English Dictionary, New York, N.Y: Bantam Books, 1976.

Miller, Phillip, The Ring of Words: An Anthology of Song Texts, New York: W.W. Norton and Company, 1985.

Panofka, H., The Art of Singing, New York, N.Y: G. Schirmer, Inc.

Sieber, F. 36 Eight –Measure Vocalises, New York, N.Y: G. Schirmer, Inc.

Steiner, Roger J., The Bantam New College French/English Dictionary, New York, N.Y: Bantam Books, 1991.

Traupman, Joel C., The Bantam New College German/English Dictionary, New York, N.Y: Bantam Books, 1991.



  1. STEPS TO PRIVATE STUDY

New students should report to the Vocal Studies Coordinator for placement in a voice studio. Students should bring a copy of their semester schedule when reporting. At that time students may request a specific teacher. Every effort will be made to place each student with the teacher of his/her preference. Students with no preference will be place with a teacher who has openings for students. Once the teacher assignment has been made, it is the student’s responsibility to contact the teacher to arrange a lesson time.


  1. SCHEDULING OF LESSONS

A copy of your semester schedule will be given to your assigned teacher. It is your responsibility to contact your teacher, either in person, by e-mail, or telephone, at the beginning of each semester to schedule your lesson at a time which is mutually convenient. Failure to do so in a timely fashion may result in the loss of your place in the studio or the loss of lessons during the first weeks of the semester. Your scheduled lesson time is the same as a set class meeting. You should arrive at each lesson on time, with your assignment prepared. The relationship between teacher and student bring their expectations and expertise to this very individualized time of learning and work together to make satisfactory technical and musical progress.


  1. ENSEMBLE REQUIREMENT

Each student in the Bachelor of Science in Music Education and Bachelor of Science in Liberal Arts (with a vocal music concentration) degree programs must be enrolled for a minimum of seven semesters in a major ensemble which reflects the student’s major applied area during each semester of residence with the approval of the major applied teacher and the department chair. Each student in the Bachelor of Science in Commercial Music degree program must be enrolled for a minimum of 7 semesters in ensembles which reflect the major performing specialty.
Vocal Ensembles of Record

Showstoppers

University Choir

Meistersingers

Commercial Music Ensemble

Opera Workshop



Jazz Vocal Ensemble

  1. REPERTOIRE REQUIREMENTS

Please note that the repertoire requirements that follow are minimum guidelines, indicative of adequate achievement. Students are urged to achieve beyond the minimum requirements. The number of required memorized songs may be reduced if the student completes a significant performance (opera role, recital, major choral solo, etc.) during the semester. The decrease in the number of songs will be determined by the teacher.
Students wishing to change degree programs while maintaining voice as their major instrument must first discuss the change with their private teacher. Change to a degree program with more strenuous repertoire requirements require deficiencies in repertoire to be remedied within two semesters.
Bachelor of Science in Music Education

Bachelor of Science in Liberal Arts (with a vocal music concentration)
Applied Voice I (1st semester): Four pieces in 2 languages. Italian and English recommended.

Applied Voice II (2nd semester): Four pieces in 2 languages. Italian and English required.

Applied Voice III (1st semester): Five pieces in 2 languages. Italian and German recommended.

Applied Voice IV (2nd semester): Five pieces in 2 languages. Italian and German required.

Applied Voice V (1st semester): Five pieces (or 10 minutes) in 3 languages. Ital., Gr., Fr. recommended.

Applied Voice VI (2nd semester): Five pieces (or 10 minutes) in 3 languages. Ital., Gr., Fr. required.

Applied Voice VII (1st semester): Six pieces (or 15 minutes) in 3 languages. Ital., Gr., Fr. required.

Applied Voice VIII (2nd semester): Six pieces (or 15 minutes) in 3 languages. Ital., Gr., Fr. required.
Bachelor of Science in Commercial Music
Applied Voice I (1st semester): Four pieces. Italian and English recommended.

Applied Voice II (2nd semester): Four pieces. Italian and English required.

Applied Voice III (1st semester): Five pieces. Addition of third language recommended.

Applied Voice IV (2nd semester): Five pieces.

Applied Voice V

(1st semester): Five pieces.

Applied Voice VI (2nd semester): Five pieces.

Applied Voice VII (1st semester): Six pieces.

Applied Voice VIII (2nd semester): Six pieces.

Non-Music Majors

Instrumentalists taking voice

Vocal Music Minors
Applied Voice I (1st semester): Two pieces. Italian and English recommended.

Applied Voice II (2nd semester): Two pieces. Italian and English required.

Applied Voice III (1st semester): Three pieces. Addition of third language recommended.

Applied Voice IV (2nd semester): Three pieces.

Applied Voice V (1st semester): Three pieces.

Applied Voice VI (2nd semester): Three pieces.

Applied Voice VII (1st semester): Four pieces.

Applied Voice VIII (2nd semester): Four pieces.

Master of Science in Music Education
1st semester: Eight pieces.

Each subsequent semester: Eight pieces.

During the second year: Recital hearing and Graduate Recital (Four languages required).

Graduate Students-Non-Music Majors
Four pieces per semester. Italian and English required. The addition of German and French with each subsequent semester is recommended.


5. PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS
Recitals

Each student in the Bachelor of Science in Music Education and Bachelor of Science in Liberal Arts (with a vocal music concentration), degree programs must present a senior recital. Guidelines for recital presentations can be obtained from the Music Department office. Students may only schedule a senior recital with the approval of the applied teacher. Each student in the Bachelor of Science in Commercial Music degree program with a performance concentration must present a senior project as required by the Commercial Music Division. Each student in the Master Of Science in Music Education degree program must present a graduate recital. Guidelines for recital presentations can be obtained from the Music Department office. Students may only schedule a graduate recital with the approval of the applied teacher.


Recital Hearings

Voice students who intend to present a senior voice recital must first present a voice hearing before the voice faculty. The hearing must take place at least one month prior to the recital date. The coordinator will arrange a time that fits the schedules of all involved. At the hearing the student will present a copy of the recital outline to the faculty. The student will present a piece from the program of his/her choosing and then each faculty member will choose a piece for the student to sing. The student need not present the entire recital at that time.
Commercial Styles and Performance Seminars

All voice majors must perform on Performance Seminar or Commercial Styles Seminar at least 2 times per semester.


NATS Auditions and Off-campus Performances

Students are encouraged to participate in the NATS (National Association of Teachers of Singing) Student Auditions, other appropriate competitions, and other outside opportunities for performance as deemed appropriate by the private teacher.



6. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS
Concerts and Recitals

Your attendance at recitals and concerts given by Vocal Faculty and voice majors is required. If you must be absent from one of these performances, you must discuss your reasons with your voice teacher in advance.


Voice Master classes, Recitals, Choral Concerts, Musical Productions

These events are arranged to heighten your vocal education and are often without additional cost to students. Your attendance at these events is an integral part of your education, and is required unless excused in advance by your voice instructor. If you must be absent from one of these performances, you must be excused by your voice teacher in advance.


Studio Performance Class

All majors must attend the studio performance class presented at the end of each semester.


7. EXAMINATION PROCEDURES
Voice Juries

All voice majors must complete a voice jury for the voice faculty at the end of each semester. At this time the student will be held responsible for his/her assigned repertoire as well as translations for that semester. Voice majors (Applied Voice 1 and 2) must be prepared to perform one memorized song. Voice majors level 3 and higher must present 2 memorized pieces. Voice minors must be prepared to perform one memorized song from the semester’s study. Graduate students must present three memorized songs. Students must also be prepared to demonstrate a vocalise appropriate to their level if requested. The outcome of this jury will influence the student’s grade and his/her progression to the next performance level. Approval to advance at the end of the second semester of study at each level will be determined by the voice faculty. Failure to advance will require continuation of study at the same level each subsequent semester until approval is given. During the sophomore year, students who have had little success as music majors are encouraged to change majors.
Attendance and Grading Policy

If you are ill or have an emergency to attend to, you must call in advance of the lesson time. Call your teacher’s studio or call the music office at 963-4541 and make sure the message is delivered directly to the instructor. Email is also an option. Unexcused missed lessons will automatically lower your grade.


Weekly voice lesson grades: 50%

Public Solo Performance(s) grade: 25%

End of semester jury grade: 25%
Each lesson will have a recorded grade.

If a jury is not required, weekly voice grade is 100%.



  1. GENERAL INFORMATION


Teacher Changes

If a student wishes to change their teacher assignment, he/she must first discuss this with their present teacher and then with the Vocal Studies Coordinator. Changes in assignment may only be made at the start of a new semester. Studying with two different teachers at once is a violation of NATS professional ethics.



Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)

Any student whose disabilities fall within ADA must inform the instructor at the beginning of the term of any special needs or equipment necessary to accomplish the requirements for this course. Students who have or may be dealing with a disability or learning difficulty should speak to the instructor or contact the appropriate agency as indicated in the university catalog.


The Tennessee State University Vocal Program

Audition Requirements: Voice



Undergraduate

Students must successfully complete an audition before being admitted into the vocal program. Those wishing to apply for the Bachelor of Science in Music Education - Vocal, Bachelor of Science in Commercial Music – Vocal and the Bachelor of Science in Liberal Arts – Vocal degree programs will be expected to:



  1. Sing three contrasting solo compositions prepared from memory that demonstrate technical facility and musicianship. One of these selections should be in a foreign language; i.e., French, German, or Italian. Another selection should be a 20th century composition in English.

  2. Match pitches that are played on the piano and sight - sing.

Students wanting to study voice at Tennessee State University as a voice minor must also present an audition for the vocal area faculty. The audition should include two solo compositions, selected by the applicant, that demonstrate technical facility and musicianship. An accompanist may be provided upon request at least one week prior to the audition. Contact the Coordinator of Vocal Studies to insure the availability of an accompanist.

To Schedule an Audition

Auditions are held during registration week prior to the beginning of classes. To schedule an audition contact our office at (615) 963 – 5358 or via email at dnettles@tnstate.edu. Provide your name, voice classification, and phone number. You will be informed as soon as possible of your scheduled audition time.



Financial Assistance

Vocal scholarships, stipends, and departmental service awards are available to students upon recommendation of the vocal area faculty. There are also a number of University scholarships and graduate assistantships for which you may apply. Contact the Office of Financial Aid for information at (615) 963 – 5701. All students are required to apply for federal financial aid. This should be done as early as January in order to be considered for the best financial package.



Recorded Auditions

If for some reason a live audition cannot be arranged, a high quality recorded audition (videotape or DVD) may be submitted. The recorded [performance must include all the qualifying audition requirements listed above. At the beginning of the recorded presentation state your name, voice classification, and high school. Include with your recording a copy if each audition piece. Your audition is given full consideration only after a sight – singing/aural perception session has been completed. Recorded auditions should be mailed to: Dr. Darryl Glenn Nettles, Department of Music, Tennessee State University, 3500 John A. Merritt Blvd., Nashville, Tennessee, 37209. Please feel free to contact us should you have questions or concerns.








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