Appendix III: mdph cancer Control Initiatives and Publications



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Appendix III:  MDPH Cancer Control Initiatives and Publications

This Appendix was developed by the Comprehensive Cancer Prevention and Control Program of the Bureau of Family and Community Health, Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH).  The MDPH is working to reduce the incidence and mortality of cancer throughout the Commonwealth.  The following is a description of some of the current efforts to reduce the risk of specific cancers.  For further information about specific cancers or cancer-related programs and issues, please call the Coordinator of Comprehensive Cancer Prevention and Control at 617-624-5441.
BLADDER CANCER

The incidence of bladder cancer increases with age and is three times more common in men than in women.  Smoking appears to double a person's risk of bladder cancer. 

MDPH is currently working to reduce the incidence of bladder cancer through the following activities:



  • initiating an extensive program of tobacco-control activities.  For specific activities, refer to the strategies of the Massachusetts Tobacco Control Program as listed under the section for Lung Cancer;

  • developing statistical publications, such as Selected Cancers in Massachusetts Men 1982-1996, which include information on bladder cancer.
BREAST CANCER

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in Massachusetts and throughout the United States.

In 1992, MDPH launched a breast and cervical cancer screening program for uninsured and underinsured eligible women in order to detect these diseases when they are most treatable.  In addition, in 1992 the state legislature allocated moneys for a breast cancer research program.  Funding for research has increased in subsequent years, and funds specifically for research related to environmental risk factors have been added.

MDPH is currently involved in numerous activities to address breast cancer in Massachusetts, including:


  • providing free mammograms and clinical breast examinations for uninsured and underinsured eligible women via the Massachusetts Women's Health Network;

  • developing and disseminating materials on the Massachusetts Women's Health Network, especially for low-literacy, culturally diverse, and non-English speaking women;

  • training community health outreach workers on communicating risk factors and screening options with culturally and ethnically diverse populations;

  • enhancing clinical and diagnostic skills of clinicians throughout Massachusetts by providing continuing education training;

  • providing continuing education for mammography technologists;

  • funding a breast cancer research program;

  • researching possible environmental links to breast cancer;

  • promoting public and professional awareness of issues related to the genetics of breast cancer;

  • holding an annual breast cancer research symposium;

  • working to reduce possible risk factors associated with breast cancer such as poor nutrition and lack of physical activity;

  • providing a clearinghouse of publications concerning breast cancer;

  • developing statistical publications, such as Cancer in Massachusetts Women 1989-1998, which include information on breast cancer.
CERVICAL CANCER

Cancer of the cervix uteri is highly curable when detected at an early, pre-invasive stage.

MDPH is currently involved in the following cervical cancer prevention and control activities:



  • providing free Pap tests for uninsured and underinsured eligible women and teens via the Massachusetts Women's Health Network and Family Planning programs;

  • training community health outreach workers on communicating risk factors and screening options with culturally and ethnically diverse populations;

  • educating medical professionals on counseling patients about cervical cancer and performing cervical cancer screenings;

  • working to reduce the risk of cervical cancer associated with exposure to tobacco smoke and sexually transmitted diseases;

  • providing continuing education for cytotechnologists on cervical cytology;

  • developing statistical publications, such as Cancer in Massachusetts Women 1989-1998, which include information on cervical cancer;

  • providing a clearinghouse of publications concerning cervical cancer;

  • implementing prevention programs to address viral sexually transmitted diseases, such as HPV, herpes virus and HIV infection.
COLORECTAL CANCER

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in Massachusetts.  It may be prevented through lifestyle changes including a healthy diet, increased physical activity, and tobacco cessation.  Mortality from colorectal cancer can be greatly decreased through screening and early detection. 

MDPH, in partnership with the American Cancer Society, the Massachusetts Medical Society, the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Harvard School of Public Health, Boston University Medical School, and other organizations and individuals, has formed the Massachusetts Colorectal Cancer Working Group to address colorectal cancer in Massachusetts. 

MDPH is working to reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer through the following activities:


  • co-sponsoring trainings and conferences for health care outreach workers and health care professionals;

  • distributing information on colorectal cancer prevention and screening to health care professionals in the Commonwealth;

  • developing statistical publications, such as Selected Cancers in Massachusetts Men 1982-1996 and Cancer in Massachusetts Women 1989-1998, which include information on colorectal cancer;

  • producing public information posters and brochures, including You Can Prevent Colorectal Cancer and Take Control: Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer; in a variety of languages.

  • Conducting surveys to determine Massachusetts health care providers' knowledge, perceptions, and screening practices regarding colorectal cancer;

  • increasing public understanding of colorectal cancer risk factors;

  • conducting statewide media campaigns to increase public awareness.
LEUKEMIA

Leukemia is the most common cancer to be diagnosed in children.  However, adults account for almost 90% of new cases of leukemia, despite the common belief that it is primarily a childhood disease.  There are several types of acute and chronic leukemia, which are classified according to the cell type involved.  Although the incidence of leukemia has not changed dramatically over the past 50 years, survival rates have increased for some forms of the disease. 

MDPH's current activities around leukemia include:



  • responding to citizen inquiries about leukemia;

  • providing technical assistance and resources to schools on care of children with leukemia in educational settings;

  • providing information on care coordination for children with leukemia for families who request it;

  • providing support and networking opportunities with other families for families of children with leukemia;

  • developing statistical publications, such as Childhood Cancer in Massachusetts, which include information on leukemia;

  • conducting environmental epidemiological investigations in several Massachusetts communities.
LUNG CANCER

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death for both men and women.  Despite high incidence and mortality rates and the lack of screening tests, lung cancer is a largely preventable disease.  Since 85% of lung cancers can be attributed to cigarette smoke, the most effective strategy for preventing lung cancer is through tobacco control.  Several prospective studies show that a former smoker's risk of developing lung cancer can be reduced by half within five years.  The risk of lung cancer from smoking may be augmented by other factors including exposure to carcinogens. 

MDPH, mainly through the Massachusetts Tobacco Control Program, is working to reduce the risk of lung cancer through the following activities:



  • helping smokers quit smoking through local tobacco treatment services and statewide services including the Try to Stop Tobacco Resource Center's telephone helpline, website, and clearinghouse;

  • providing funding and training to local boards of health to promote and enforce local regulations that reduce youth access to tobacco products and reduce exposure to environmental tobacco smoke;

  • raising public awareness about the health issues related to tobacco use and the need for tobacco control public policy initiatives through community-based programs including Tobacco Free Community Mobilization Networks and Youth Action Alliances;

  • conducting a statewide tobacco control media campaign, including paid TV and radio spots;

  • creating and supporting the Try to Stop Tobacco Resource Center's Tobacco Education Clearinghouse to distribute materials and resources;

  • measuring changes in adult and youth attitudes toward tobacco use;

  • developing statistical publications, such as Selected Cancers in Massachusetts Men 1982-1996 and Cancer in Massachusetts Women 1989-1998, which include information on lung cancer;

  • conducting public awareness programs around the risk of lung cancer that is associated with exposure to radon gas;

  • funding school programs to prevent youth from starting and cessation programs for those who start to smoke;

  • researching possible environmental links to lung cancer.
NON-HODGKIN'S LYMPHOMA

Massachusetts’ activities around non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma include:

  • responding to citizen inquiries about non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma;

  • developing statistical publications, such as Selected Cancers in Massachusetts Men 1982-1996, which include information on non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
ORAL CANCER

Tobacco and excessive alcohol use are the greatest risk factors for oral cancer.  However, poor nutrition, poor oral hygiene, and chronic irritation of the mouth due to ill-fitting dentures or broken teeth also play a role.  Early detection of oral cancer can significantly reduce morbidity and mortality. 

MDPH, in partnership with the Boston University School of Dental Medicine, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Forsythe Institute, American Cancer Society, and Massachusetts Dental Society, has formed the Oral Cancer Partnership and is currently involved in reducing the risk of oral cancer through the following activities:



  • educating the public about oral cancer through outreach and distribution of educational materials;

  • educating primary care providers involved with populations at high risk for oral cancer;

  • promoting tobacco cessation;

  • developing statistical publications, such as Selected Cancers in Massachusetts Men 1982-1996, which include information on oral cancer;

  • reducing the risk of oral cancer from nutritional deficiencies.
OVARIAN CANCER

Ovarian cancer is the fourth most frequent cause of cancer death in women in the United States.  It is curable when detected early.  However, because there is no general screening method and it has no symptoms in its early stages, ovarian cancer often goes undetected. MDPH, in partnership with the Massachusetts Chapter of the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition, the Ovarian Cancer Education and Awareness Network (OCEAN), the Rendon Group, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Brigham and Women's Hospital, has formed the Massachusetts Ovarian Cancer Awareness Partnership and is currently involved in raising awareness of ovarian cancer through the following activities:

  • promoting public and professional awareness of issues related to ovarian cancer;

  • promoting public awareness of how to decrease the risk of ovarian cancer through the Massachusetts Women's Health Network, Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and Family Planning;

  • developing statistical publications, such as Cancer in Massachusetts Women 1989.1998, which include information on ovarian cancer.
PROSTATE CANCER

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in Massachusetts, with the exception of skin cancer. MDPH, in partnership with the Massachusetts Prostate Cancer Coalition, works to reduce prostate cancer incidence and mortality and to address issues of quality of life for prostate cancer survivors and their families.  The following MDPH activities are currently underway to address prostate cancer:

  • increasing knowledge and awareness among men and their families about prostate cancer through a variety of community-based programs and media strategies;

  • developing and distributing educational materials about prostate cancer that are culturally sensitive and available in several languages and at varying literacy levels;

  • linking uninsured and underinsured men with medical care, including prostate cancer screening through sixteen Men's Health Partnership sites;

  • funding prostate cancer survivor support groups across Massachusetts;

  • developing statistical publications, such as Selected Cancers in Massachusetts Men 1982-1996, which include information on prostate cancer;

  • co-sponsoring an annual prostate cancer symposium;

  • providing publications concerning prostate cancer though the Massachusetts Health Promotion Clearinghouse.
SKIN CANCER (INCLUDING MELANOMA)

Skin cancer is the most common and preventable form of cancer in the United States.  Almost all skin cancers are curable if detected and treated early, before they have spread to other tissues.  Exposure to ultraviolet radiation, most frequently from the sun but also from tanning beds and booths, is the primary cause of skin cancer. 

MDPH, in partnership with the American Cancer Society, Boston University School of Medicine, the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Harvard School of Public Health, the Massachusetts Melanoma Foundation, and other organizations and individuals, has formed the Massachusetts Skin Cancer Prevention Collaborative to address skin cancer in Massachusetts. 

MDPH is currently involved in the following activities to prevent skin cancer:


  • helping hospital maternity units to develop skin cancer prevention programs for mothers of newborns;

  • assisting communities developing local skin cancer prevention programs;

  • helping summer camps, child care centers, and schools develop programs and policies to prevent skin cancer;

  • training child care workers on safe sun practices;

  • increasing awareness of the dangers of exposure to ultraviolet radiation by participating in a national and local television, radio and newspaper public service campaign;

  • developing and distributing skin cancer prevention materials including tip cards and posters;

  • increasing awareness among health professionals;

  • developing statistical publications, such as Selected Cancers in Massachusetts Men 1982-1996 and Cancer in Massachusetts Women 1989-1998, which include information on melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer.
TESTICULAR CANCER

Testicular cancer accounts for 1% of all cancers in males.  In Massachusetts, testicular cancer is the most common cancer in men ages 20 to 44.

Massachusetts is currently working to reduce the risk of testicular cancer through the following efforts:



  • including testicular cancer self-examination as part of Massachusetts’ recommended school health curriculum;

  • developing and distributing testicular cancer public and professional information materials;

  • developing statistical publications, such as Selected Cancers in Massachusetts Men 1982-1996, which include information on testicular cancer.
UTERINE CANCER

There is currently no screening test for uterine cancer.  The Pap smear, which is used to detect cervical cancer, finds fewer than half of endometrial (uterine) cancers.

MDPH is currently working to address uterine cancer through the following activities:



  • providing information concerning uterine cancer through the Massachusetts Women's Health Network and Family Planning programs;

  • developing statistical publications, such as Cancer in Massachusetts Women 1989.1998, which include information on uterine cancer.



Cancer-Related Publications from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH)

Breast and Cervical Cancer

Available through Massachusetts Health Promotion Clearinghouse, telephone 1.800.952.6637, website www.maclearinghouse.com:

  • Bilingual Mammography Patient’s “Bill of Rights”   (information card, available in English/Spanish)

  • Bilingual Mammography Patient's "Bill of Rights"   (poster, available in English/Spanish)

  • Massachusetts Breast Cancer Research Program   (booklet for researchers)

  • They Say The Best Things In Life Are Free   (poster)

  • What You Should Know about Breast Cancer (brochure, available in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Haitian Creole, Vietnamese, and Chinese)

  • What You Should Know about Cervical Cancer (brochure, available in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Haitian Creole, Vietnamese, and Chinese)

Available through Massachusetts Department of Public Health Women's Health Network, telephone 1-877-414-4447:

  • Women’s Health Network Bilingual Information Card   (eligibility criteria and contact information for free health screening, available in Chinese, English, Haitian Creole, Khmer, Lao, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Vietnamese)

  • Bilingual Women's Health Network (wallet card)

  • Women's Health Network Passport Health Guide   (booklet, available in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Chinese, and Vietnamese)

  • Women’s Health Network Program Point of Purchase Display   (stand with tear-off cards)
Colorectal Cancer

Available through Massachusetts Department of Public Health Cancer Prevention and Control Program, telephone 617-624-5290:

  • Colorectal Cancer Prevention   (laminated reference card for health care professionals)

  • Life Begins at 50.  Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer   (poster)

  • Take Control.  Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer   (public brochure, available in Chinese, English, French, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish)

  • You Can Prevent Colorectal Cancer   (public brochure, available in Chinese, English, French, Khmer, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Vietnamese; also available as a fact sheet in Bosnian)

Available through American Digestive Health Foundation, telephone 1-800-668-5237:

  • Women and Colorectal Cancer: What Are the Facts   (brochure, available in English and Spanish)
Ovarian Cancer

To order any of these pamphlets, send requests via mail or fax to:

National Ovarian Cancer Coalition, Inc.


500 NE Spanish River Blvd, Ste 14
Boca Raton, FL 33431-4516

main telephone:  561-393-0005, fax 561-393-7275


information line:  1-888-682-7426 (1-888-OVARIAN)
website:  www.ovarian.org

  • Myths & Facts about Ovarian Cancer.  What You Need to Know (2nd ed.)
    by M. Steven Piver, MD and Gamal Eltabbakh, MD

  • National Ovarian Cancer Coalition.  Working to Raise Awareness About Ovarian Cancer Risks and Symptoms

  • Ovarian Cancer…It Whispers…So Listen

  • Patient to Patient   (patient resource for women with ovarian cancer)

  • What Every Woman Should Know About Ovarian Cancer
Prostate Cancer

Available through Massachusetts Health Promotion Clearinghouse, telephone 1.800.952.6637:

  • What Every Man Should Know About Prostate Cancer   (public brochure, available in Chinese, English, Haitian Creole, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish)

  • What You Learn About Prostate Cancer May Save Your Life   (poster, available in English and Spanish)

  • Prostate Cancer Fact Sheet   (fact sheet available in English, Spanish, Portuguese)

Available through MDPH Men's Health Initiative, fax 617-624-5075:

  • Prostate Cancer Survivor Groups in Massachusetts   (patient brochure)
Skin Cancer

To order the following materials, send requests to:

MDPH Skin Cancer Prevention Program


250 Washington St, 4th Floor
Boston, MA 02108-4619

telephone:  617-624-5441


fax:  617-624-5075

Massachusetts Department of Public Health materials:



  • Ban the Burn Tip Sheet -- General   (available in English, Portuguese, Spanish)

  • Ban the Burn Tip Sheet -- Newborns   (available in English, Portuguese, Spanish)

  • Ban the Burn Tip Sheet -- Preschoolers   (available in English, Portuguese, Spanish)

  • Ban the Burn Resource Guide

  • Every Day is a SunDay Coloring Calendar and Curriculum Guide

  • Ban the Burn Temporary Tattoos

  • Have a Changing Mole?   (poster)

  • Have a Changing Mole? (pocket card for patients)

  • Have a Changing Mole? (pocket card for physicians)

  • Ban the Burn  (poster)

  • New Mom's Start Sun Smart Maternity Unit Resource Guide and Video

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention materials:

Choose Your Cover:


- Parents   (brochure)
- Warning Label   (brochure)

American Academy of Dermatology materials:



  • Kids, Use Your ABC's For Safe Fun in the Sun

  • Stop!  Look for the Danger Signs

Created by Boston University:

  • Sun Protection Policy and Counselor Handbook   (for camp counselors)
Nutrition

Available through Massachusetts 5 A Day Program, Massachusetts Department of Public Health, telephone 617-624-5418:

  • African Americans Take the 5 A Day Challenge for Better Health   (brochure)

  • Eat 5 Fruits and Vegetables Every Day   (brochure, available in English and Spanish)

  • Energizing Tips for a Healthier Family   (brochure)

  • Time to Take Five:  Eat 5 Fruits and Vegetables A Day   (brochure)

  • 5 A Day Recipe Cards   (set of 10 cards)

Available through Massachusetts Department of Public Health Cancer Prevention and Control Program, telephone 617-624-5448:

  • Diet and Health Recommendations for Cancer Prevention   (booklet; includes a section on alcohol and cancer risk)
Physical Activity

To order any of these materials, send requests via mail or fax to:

Massachusetts Health Promotion Clearinghouse


The Medical Foundation
95 Berkeley St
Boston, MA 02116

fax:  617-536-8012



  • Physical Activity Fact Sheets   (reproducible facts sheets from the American Council on Exercise)

    • A Walk A Day…

    • Active Seniors Enjoy Life More

    • Exercise and Menopause

    • Exercise and Pregnancy

    • Kids in Motion

    • Making Time for Exercise is Easy

    • Moderate Exercise Will Do You A Lot of Good

    • Physical Activity Pyramid

    • The Right Exercise Program for You Starts Here

    • Three Things Every Exercise Program Should Have

  • Play 30 Minutes Poster   (colorful poster encouraging pre-adolescent girls to engage in physical activity at least 30 minutes each day)
Tobacco

These materials may be ordered from:

Massachusetts Tobacco Education Clearinghouse


JSI Research and Training Institute, Inc.
44 Farnsworth St
Boston, MA 02122-1211

telephone:  617-482-9485,  fax:  617-482-0617


e-mail:  mtec@jsi.com
website:  www.mteccatalogue.com

The Clearinghouse currently offers over 160 tobacco education pamphlets, booklets, signs, posters, fact sheets and other items. Tobacco information and cessation materials are available in ten languages. Please go to the website to view the full list of available materials. In addition, four packets of Reproducible Health Education Materials and Fact Sheets are available.



  • Packet #1:  East-to-Read Materials

    • Are You 50 or Over?  Still Smoking?  Thinking About Quitting?

    • Check Your Smoking I.Q.  An Important Quiz for Older Smokers

    • How Did You Quit?   (available in English and Spanish)

    • It's Time to Quit!

    • Smoking:  It's Never Too Late to Stop

    • You Can Stop Smoking


  • Packet #2:  Tobacco-Free Youth

    • Children's Future At Risk From Epidemic of Tobacco Use

    • Coaches -- You Can Influence Youth

    • Facts You Should Know

    • Key Elements of the President's Plan to Reduce Children's Use of Tobacco

    • Parents, Help Keep Your Kids Tobacco-Free

    • Preventing Tobacco Use Among Young People:  A Report of the Surgeon General

    • Teens and Tobacco:  Facts Not Fiction

    • What Youth Should Know About Tobacco

    • Youth and Tobacco


  • Packet #3:  Environmental Tobacco Smoke (Secondhand Smoke)

    • Environmental Tobacco Smoke and Human Health

    • It's Time To Stop Being a Passive Victim   (CDC fact sheets, available in English and Spanish)

    • Respiratory Health Effects of Passive Smoking   (EPA fact sheet)


  • Packet #4:  Tobacco Use

    • Cigarettes and Other Nicotine Products   (available in English and Spanish)

    • Facts About Cigar Smoking

    • Oral Cancer Risk Factors

    • Preventing, Stopping Use of Smokeless Tobacco

    • Smokeless Tobacco and Health:  An International Perspective

    • Smoking Cessation and the Benefits of Quitting

    • Spit Tobacco

    • Tobacco Use

    • Tobacco Use Among U.S. Racial/Ethnic Minority Groups
Other Massachusetts Cancer Registry Publications

Available through the Massachusetts Cancer Registry, telephone 617-624.5645:

  • Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Massachusetts 1995-1999

  • Cancer in Massachusetts Women 1989-1998

  • Selected Cancers in Massachusetts Men 1982-1996

  • Massachusetts Cancer Registry Public Information Brochure   (available in English, Portuguese, Spanish)


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