Ap world history syllabus (2014-2015) Course Description



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AP WORLD HISTORY SYLLABUS (2014-2015)
Course Description:

AP World History is a year-long course designed to prepare students with the skills necessary to engage the AP World History examination given in the spring. We will look at the history of the world through a new, wider lens, so students will have a better understanding of their place in our complex and global modern world. Students will devote a considerable amount of time to the critical evaluation of primary source documents and the construction of free response essays. We will use modern technology to explore broad themes and patterns of change through thousands of years of history. For a more detailed course description/perspective, please refer to the AP Central website: (http://www.apcentral.collegeboard.com).



Readings

Textbook:

Bentley and Ziegler. 2011. Traditions and Encounters, 5th ed. United States: McGraw-Hill.


Primary Sources:

Students will read and analyze primary sources selected from, but not limited to, the following :

Andrea, A. and Overfield, J. 2005. The Human Record: Sources of Global History, vols I & II. Houghton Mifflin Company.

World History in Documents: A Comparative Reader, edited by Peter N. Stearns New York and London: New York University Press.

Menglong, Feng (Compiler) and Birch, Cyril (translator). 1994. Stories from a Ming Collection, Grove Press, Later Printing Edition



Arabian Nights http://www.wollamshram.ca/1001/Lang/lang.htm

MindSparks, 2002. World History Unfolding: A MindSparks DBQ and Essay Writing Program, Ancient Times - 1500 and 1500 to the Present.

Medieval History Sourcebook (online) http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/sbook.asp

Modern History Sourcebook (online) http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/modsbook.asp

Document Based Questions released by College Board

Documents from https://sheg.stanford.edu (Stanford History Education Group)


Secondary Sources:

Students will read, analyze, and discuss or write about selections which will include, but not be limited to, the following:

Christian, David. 2008. This Fleeting World: A Short History of Humanity, Berkshire Publishing Group

Bryson, Bill. 2010. At Home: A Short History, Anchor Books, A Division of Random House

Cotterell, Arthur. 2011. Asia: A Concise History, John Wiley & Sons

Rosen, Steven J. 2002, 2004. The Hidden Glory of India, The Bhaktivedanta Book Trust

Solomon, Steven. 2010. Water: The Epic Struggle of Wealth, Power, and Civilization, HarperCollins Publishers

Montefiore, Simon Sebag. 2011. Jerusalem: The Biography, Random House

Norell, Mark and Leidy, Denise Patry and the American Museum of Natural History with Laura Ross. 2011. Traveling the Silk Road: Ancient Pathway to the Modern World, Sterling Signature

Holland, Cecilia edited by Robert Cowley. 1999. What If? Berkley

Turner, Jack. 2004. Spice: The History of Temptation, First Vintage Books

O'Donnell, James J. 2008. The Ruin of the Roman Empire: The Emperor Who Brought It Down, The Barbarian Who Could Have Saved It, Harper Collins

Diamond, Jared M. 1999, 1997. Guns, Germs, and Steel: the fates of human societies, W.W. Norton & Company, Inc.

Hochschild, Adam. 1998 King Leopold's Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror, and Heroism in Colonial Africa, Mariner Books

Graeber, David. 2102. Debt: The First 5,000 Years, Melville House.

Millard, Candace. 2005. The River of Doubt: Theodore Roosevelt's Darkest Journey, Anchor Books.

Roberts, J. M. and Westad, Odd Arne. 2013. The History of the World, Oxford University Press.

Brown, Stephen R. 2009. Merchant Kings: When Companies Ruled the World, 1600-1900, St. Martin's Press.

Chang, Jung. 1991. Wild Swans: The Three Daughters of China, First Touchstone Edition.

See, Lisa. 2006. Snow Flower and the Secret Fan, Random House.

Ebrey, Patricia Buckley. 1996. The Cambridge Illustrated History of China, Cambridge University Press.

Brown, Cynthia Stokes. 2007. Big History: From Big Bang to the Present, W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., New York.

Lester, Toby. 2009. The Fourth Part of the World: The Race to the Ends of the Earth, and the Epic Story of the Map that Gave America its Name, Free Press a division of Simon & Schuster.
Themes:

AP World History has five overarching themes which we will trace throughout the course. The themes provide way to organize comparisons and analyze changes and continuities. For a thematic correlation to the textbook, see Bentley and Ziegler, pp. xlv-xlvii.


Theme One: Interaction Between Humans and the Environment

demography and disease; migration, patterns of settlement, and technology



Theme Two: Development and interaction of cultures

religions; belief systems, philosophies and ideologies; science and technology; the arts and architecture



Theme Three: State Building, Expansion, and Conflict

political structures and forms of governance; empires, nations and nationalism, revolts and revolutions, regional, trans-regional, and global structures and organizations



Theme Four: Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems

agricultural and pastoral production; Trade and commerce; labor systems; industrialization; capitalism and socialism



Theme Five: Development and Transformation of Social Structures

gender roles and relations; family and kinship; racial and ethnic constructions; social and economic classes


Historical Skills:

The following historical thinking skills will be developed and practiced all year. For a detailed explanation of these four skills, see Bentley and Ziegler, p. xxxviii.



  1. Crafting Historical Arguments from Historical Evidence

  2. Chronological Reasoning (cause and effect; assessing patterns of change and continuity over time; periodization)

  3. Comparison and Contextualization (compare and contrast; connecting historical developments to specific times/places, and to broader regional, national or global processes)

  4. Historical Interpretation and Synthesis (describing, analyzing, evaluating, and creating diverse interpretations of the past using primary and secondary historical sources – through analysis of evidence, reasoning, contexts, points of view and frames of reference; arriving at meaningful and persuasive understandings of the past)



Periodization and Key Concepts:

Each period has 3 key concepts, except for 1750-1900, which has 4.

In Bentley and Ziegler, pp. xxxix-xliv, see charts on AP World History Chronological Correlation. They show the periods, correlating key concepts, and the corresponding page numbers in the textbook.

Period 1 – Technological and Environmental Transformations (to 600 BCE)

Key Concept 1.1 Big Geography and the Peopling of the Earth

1.2 The Neolithic Rev. and Early Agricultural Socieities

1.3 The Development and Interactions of Early Agricultural,

Pastoral and Urban Societies



Period 2 – Organization and Reorganization of Human Societies (600 BCE to 600 CE)

Key Concept 2.1 The Development and Codification of Religious and

Cultural Traditions

2.2 The Development of States and Empires

2.3 Emergence of Transregional Networks of

Communication and Exchange

Period 3 – Regional and Transregional Interactions (c. 600 CE – c.1450)

Key Concept 3.1 Expansion and Intensification of Communication and

Exchange Networks

3.2 Continuity and Innovation of State Forms and Their

Interaction

3.3 Increased Economic Productive Capacity and Its

Consequences



Period 4 – Global Interactions (c.1450-c.1750)

Key Concept 4.1 Globalizing Networks of Communication and Exchange

4.2 New Forms of Social Organization and Modes of

Production

4.3State Consolidation and Imperial Expansion



Period 5 – Industrialization and Global Integration (c.1750-1900)

Key Concept 5.1 Industrialization and Global Capitalism

5.2 Imperialism and Nation-State Formation

5.3 Nationalism, Revolution and Reform

5.4 Global Migration



Period 6 – Accelerating Global Change and Realignments (c.1900-today)

Key Concept 6.1 Science and the Environment

6.2 Global Conflicts and Their Consequences

6.3 New Conceptualizations of Global Economy, Society

and Culture



Course Schedule
Each class period will begin with a warm-up activity where students may be given a short primary or secondary source selection (relevant to the current topic of study) to read and answer questions, or they may view a video clip or Crash Course World History (relevant to the topic of study) and answer viewing guide questions.
The first day will serve as an introduction of the AP World History course which will include discussion of the following:

*Class procedures and expectations

*Course themes, historical thinking skills, periodization, and key concepts

*Map of world regions (students will label blank map)

*The AP exam

*The textbook and online resources

*Guidelines for seminar discussion and ways to contribute to the discussion:


  1. Wait your turn to speak – don’t interrupt.

  2. Use respectful tone and language, especially if you are in disagreement with another participant.

  3. Speak clearly, at an appropriate volume.

  4. Avoid dominating the discussion – all participants need to have the opportunity to contribute.

  5. Offer original insights or responses that build on ideas of other participants.

  6. Contribute in a manner that is appropriate to a particular purpose and audience.

  7. Contribute in a manner that demonstrates that you have read and understood the particular reading.

  8. Contribute in a manner that elicits reflection and responses from the other participants.

  9. Contribute in a manner that integrates multiple views, and shows respect to the ideas of others.

  10. Contribute in a manner that digs deeper into assignment questions or issues.

contribute to a discussions

k. Share an insight from on another participant’s contribution.

l. Offer and support an opinion.

m. Validate an idea with your own experience.

n. Make a suggestion.

o. Expand on another participant’s contribution.

p. Ask for evidence that supports a contribution.

q. Ask probing or clarifying questions

* Basic daily homework expectations:

-Read the assigned chapter and construct outline

-Identify terms (including especially why the term is significant) - handout of terms will be given

-Address the study questions in well-written paragraphs (see below)


Unit One - Technological and Environmental Transformations (to 600 BCE)

Days 2-8
Key Concepts

1.1 Big Geography and the Peopling of the Earth

1.2 The Neolithic Rev. and Early Agricultural So

1.3 The Development and Interactions of Early Agricultural, Pastoral and Urban Societies
Major Topics

*Prehistoric Societies

*From Foraging to Agricultural and Pastoral Societies

*Early Civilizations: Middle East, South Asia, East Asia, the Americas, Africa, and Oceania

*Indo-European and Bantu migrations
Class Discussion (Seminar) and Activities

*Students will read pp.37-38 in At Home: A Short History, pp.27-31 in This Fleeting World: A Short History of Humanity, and the article "The Worst Mistake in the History of the Human Race" (Jared Diamond, "The Worst Mistake in the History of the Human Race," Discover Magazine, May 1987, pp. 64-66) Students will discuss the causes and effects of the Neolithic Revolution (positive and negative). How are the reading selections similar? Different? Do they focus more on the positive or negative effects of the Neolithic Revolution?
*Students will use maps to discuss the migration patterns Indo-European-speaking and Bantu-speaking peoples, and they will discuss the causes and impact of the migrations.
*Students will work in small groups, each to create on poster paper a PERSIA chart of an assigned civilization (see list below). Groups will post their charts on walls around classroom so students can obtain information in gallery walk style.

-Mesopotamia

-Egypt

-South Asia



-East Asia

-Mesoamerica

-Andes region
Daily Homework

Students will read each of the following chapters in Traditions and Encounters, construct an outline for each chapter, identify the chapter terms (these will be prvided), and answer the following study questions:



Chapter One: 1) In what ways did intelligence and language enable early Homo sapiens to create traditions of reflection about the relationship of human beings and the natural world?

2) In what ways did early human migrations help explain the early spread of agriculture? 3) What were the most significant positive and negative effects of the agricultural transition on human society?



Chapter Two: 1) Compare and contrast the history of the early Jewish community and the Phoenician culture. 2) How did the Mesopotamians influence each?

Chapter Three: How did the Egyptians’ religious beliefs reflect their society, lifestyle, and geographic location?

Chapter Four: Trace the origins of the caste system, making sure to include a discussion of varnu and jati.

Chapter Five: 1) What does the term Mandate of heaven mean? 2) How did it influence political developments in early East Asia? 3) What is the relationship between patriarchy and ancestor worship in early China?

Chapter Six: 1) What role did human sacrifice play in early American societies? 2) What traditions begun by the Olmecs were later adopted by other Mesoamerican societies?

A short reading quiz may be given daily.

Unit Two (600 BCE - 600 CE) - Organization and Reorganization of Human Societies

Days 9-19


Key Concepts

2.1 The Development and Codification of Religious and Cultural Traditions

2.2 The Development of States and Empire

2.3 Emergence of Transregional Networks of Communication and Exchange


Major Topics

Classical Civilizations

*Persian Empires

*Qin and Han China

*India

*Mediterranean World: Greece and Rome



Major Belief Systems: Religion and Philosophy

*Animism focusing on Australasia and Sub-Saharan Africa

*Judaism and Christianity

*Hinduism and Buddhism

*Daoism and Confucianism

Early Trading Networks

*Silk Road

*Indian Ocean


Class Discussion (Seminar) and Activities
*Students will read and analyze three primary sources on long-distant travel and exchange of the period:

1) Pliny the Elder, NATURAL HISTORY 2) Faxian, TRAVELS 3) FIVE ROBED STATUES ( these are five sculptures of the period - students will need to apply techniques used by art historians to analyze how these works of art are evidence of cultural exchange)

Students will use these documents to discuss the following questions: 1) Who and what moved along the main transregional trade routes in this era? 2) What were the significant consequences of these networks of exchange?


*Students will evaluate issue of periodization regarding textbook's inclusion of Maya and Teotihuacan in Unit One instead of Classical period of Unit Two.
* DBQ "Workshop" #1

-Students will receive instruction on the DBQ essay and view a tutorial.

-Students will read examples of DBQs released by College Board and in small groups practice

evaluating samples of student work.


* Students will work in small groups where they will create a chart comparing the core beliefs, institutions, gender roles, and reach/spread of each of the world religions.

* Comparison Essay Workshop #1

-Students will receive instruction on the comparison essay and view a tutorial.

-Students will read examples of comparison essays released by College Board and in small groups evaluating released samples of student work.

-Students will work in small groups to complete a chart on the causes and consequences of the

decline of the Han, Gupta, and Roman Empires.

-Students will then each write an essay comparing the collapses of two of the empires.


Daily Homework

Students will read each of the following chapters in Traditions and Encounters, construct an outline for each chapter, identify the chapter terms (these will be provided), and answer the following study questions:



Chapter Seven: In what ways did Darius and his successors promote communication and commerce throughout the empire?

Chapter Eight: What were the most significant technological developments during this period of Chinese history?

Chapter Nine: 1) What was the popular appeal of Buddhism? 2) How does it compare and contrast to Hinduism?

Chapter Ten: 1) Compare and contrast Sparta and Athens. 2) Trace the development of Greek philosophical thought from Socrates through the Hellenistic philosophers.

Chapter Eleven: 1) What was the appeal of the early Christian teachings? 2) What sorts of people were most attracted to it?

Chapter Twelve: How did China’s culture change after the decline of the Han dynasty?

A short reading quiz may be given daily.
Unit Three (600 CE-1450) - Regional and Transregional Interactions

Days 20-34


Key Concepts

3.1 Expansion and Intensification of Communication and Exchange Networks

3.2 Continuity and Innovation of State Forms and Their Interaction

3.3 Increased Economic Productive Capacity and Its Consequences


Major Topics

Byzantine Empire, Dar-al Islam, & Germanic Europe

Crusades

Sui, Tang, Song, and Ming empires

Delhi Sultanate

The Americas

The Turkish Empires

Italian city-states

Kingdoms & Empires in Africa

The Mongol Khanates

Trading Networks in the Post-Classical World

Discussion (Seminar) and Activities
*Students will read and analyze primary and secondary sources (including map of Muslim expansion) to answer the question, how did the Muslims expand? Then students will discuss the impact of expansion.

(Sources)

Al-Biladuri: The Battle of the Yarmuk (636) and After. In Internet Medieval Source Book.

Fordham University. http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/source/yarmuk.asp

The Treaty of Tudmir. In Olivia Remie Constable (Ed.), Medieval Iberia: Readings from

Christian, Muslim, and Jewish Sources (pp. 37-38). Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania

Press, 1997

Donner, F. (1981). The Early Islamic Conquests. Princeton: Princeton University Press.


*Cities Discussion - Students will list the following cities of this period:

Constantinople Chang'an

Tenochtitlan Kiev

Jerusalem Florence

Mecca Cairo

Venice Baghdad

Timbuktu
Each student will be assigned a city and will research its role/function during that period.

Then, a student will be chosen to discuss his/her city, and then another student will be chosen to do the same but must also find a connection to the previous city.


*Qing Ming Festival - Analysis of this artwork from Song China will allow students to see change over time (growth of cities) and discuss the factors that allowed for the increased urbanization in China, as well as its impact (all five themes can be addressed). Students will also analyze the scroll for religious elements (Confucianism, Daoism, Buddhism).

Students will use the following online sites to view the scroll:

http://www.courses.fas.harvard.edu/~icgzmod/qingming_student.html

http://www.npm.gov.tw/exh96/orientation/flash_4/index.html (For a more interactive scroll)

http://www.chinaonlinemuseum.com/painting-along-the-river.php (with different versions)
*Students will be assigned to read the book Stories from a Ming Dynasty and a choice of project. The project they choose will be required to demonstrate how the stories reflect Post-Classical China.
*CCOT Essay Workshop #1

-Students will receive instruction on writing the CCOT essay and view a tutorial.

-Students will read examples of CCOT essays released by College Board and in small groups

evaluate samples of student work.

-Students will plan a CCOT essay on the changes and continuities in patterns and interactions

along the Silk Roads between 200CE- 1450.


*DBQ Essay Workshop #2

-Students will utilize MindSparks documents (Class, Caste, and Gender in Europe and Asia) to

practice developing thesis statements and intro paragraphs.

*Comparison Essay Workshop #2

- Students will work in small groups and construct a chart on the impact of Mongol rule on the

following: Russia, China, and Middle East.

-Students will write an essay comparing the impact of Mongol rule on two of the above.


*Students will discuss a question of periodization: How does the textbook's periodization of this unit compare to that of the AP WHIST course? Does the difference matter? Explain.
*Marco Polo - World Class Traveler or World Class Myth? Why the disagreements?

-Students will evaluate three sources on Marco Polo and the video Smithsonian's "Mystery Files" on Marco Polo in order to address the above questions. What other kinds of sources would have

been helpful?

(Written Sources)

Strathern, Paul. 2013. The Venetians: A New History: From Marco Polo to Casanova, Pegasus Books, LLC.

"The West and the Mongols: Marco Polo" from World History in Documents: A Comparative Reader, edited by Peter N. Stearns New York and London: New York University Press.

Bergreen, Laureance. 2007. Marco Polo: From Venice to Xandu, First Vintage Books Edition


*Student project: Students will read Arabian Nights, reading the translation of choice, and choosing what stories or parts of stories that they want to read in order to complete this project. The task is to write an essay in which students relate information concerning Islam to the material in the stories. They will be required to consider certain questions as they read the stories (handout of these will be given), but more sophisticated essays may go beyond these ideas. Students should write a cohesive essay that addresses what they see in the stories that reflect the values and culture of Islam.

*Class Discussions (Seminar):

-How dark were the Dark Ages? Is it fair to use that term? Why or why not?

-Should the histories of people in the Americas and Oceania be separated from the histories of the peoples and societies of the eastern hemisphere, or can they be incorporated?

-What were the changes and continuities from the now-extinct classical empires to the post-classical empires?

-What were the most important short-term and long-term effects of long-distance travel in the period 1200-1500?

-How can we account for the relationship between religion and commerce in the early kingdoms and empires of West Africa?
Daily Homework

Students will read each of the following chapters in Traditions and Encounters, construct an outline for each chapter, identify the chapter terms (these will be provided), and answer the following study questions:



Chapter 13: What were the fundamental tenets of Islam?

Chapter 14: Trace the development of Buddhism in China and how it interacted with Daoism and Confucianism

Chapter 15: How did the seasonal monsoons affect the trade of the Indian Ocean?

Chapter 16: 1) What was the role of Roman Christianity in early medieval Europe? 2) How did it shape society?

Chapter 17: Through what means did the Mongols integrate Eurasian cultures?

Chapter 18: Discuss the history of slavery in Africa. How did the developments in the slave trade from 1000 to 1500 set the stage for the Atlantic slave trade to come?

Chapter 19: Where and how did Europe expand during the high middle ages?

Chapter 20: What are some of the distinctive features of Inca society and religion?

Chapter 21: What were the social and economic outcomes of the plague?

A short reading quiz may be given daily.

Unit Four (1450-1750) - Global Interactions

Days 35-49


Key Concepts

4.1 Globalizing Networks of Communication and Exchange

4.2 New Forms of Social Organization and Modes of Production

4.3 State Consolidation and Imperial Expansion


Major Topics

Bringing the Eastern and Western Hemispheres Together into One Web

Ming and Qing Rule in China

Japanese Shogunates

The Trading Networks of the Indian Ocean

Effects of the Continued Spread of Belief Systems

Three Islamic Empires: Ottoman, Safavid, Mughal

Cross-Cultural Interaction: the Columbian Exchange

The Atlantic Slave Trade

Changes in Western Europe—roots of the “Rise of the West”


Discussions (Seminar) and Activities
*Students will read and analyze the following primary sources and then answer the questions listed below. Their responses should be at least two paragraphs long.

(Sources)

Olaudah Equiano, "The Interesting Narrative of Olauda Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa the African" (from World History in Documents)

John Barbot, "A Description of the Coasts of North and South Guinea," in Thomas Astley and John Churchill, eds., Collection of Voyages and Travels (London, 1732).

From Miguel LeonPortilla, ed. 1962.  The Broken Spears: The Aztec Account of the Conquest of Mexico, Boston: Beacon Press,

Bartolome de las Casas, "Destruction of the Indies"

 Questions to Answer:


  1. Describe the cultural interaction you see in each of the documents between Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans. Does this interaction appear positive or negative? Support your opinion with facts from the documents.

  2. Barbot and de las Casas are European, whereas Equiano is African and the Broken Spears are Aztec accounts. How do these differing points of view affect the opinion of each writer? Explain. Is one source more credible than another? Why or why not?


*CCOT Workshop #2

Students will write a CCOT essay on trade and commerce in the Indian Ocean Basin, 600-1750.


*Students will view National Geographic's "The Great Inca Rebellion" to see how archaeologists and forensic scientists used their expertise to uncover what really happened in this rebellion, refuting the primary source accounts of the Spaniards.
*Comparison Essay Workshop #3 & #4

-Compare political and cultural developments and maritime expansion in 15th century China and Europe.

-Compare and Contrast any two systems of forced labor: Caribbean Slavery, Slavery in the English North American colonies, Slavery in Brazil, Spanish Mita system in South America, West African slavery, Muslim slavery in South West Asia, India Hindu castes, or East European serfdom.
*Art/Architecture Analysis: Students will apply methods used by art historians to analyze art and architecture of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, discussing the changes from the earlier art period to the next and how the art reflects the time period.

*DBQ Workshop #3

Students will utilize the Mindsparks documents to practice evaluating evidence and analyzing primary source documents (The Individual in the Renaissance and Reformation), as well as grouping the documents.

-To understand concept of grouping documents, students will be placed in small groups and

given a bag with different kinds of candy. Each group of students will need to come up with different ways to group the candy (size, shape, color, etc...) and think of an additional kind of candy that would add to the group.

-Students will develop a thesis statement and introductory paragraph to address the question of how attitudes toward the individual had changed in Europe from the medieval to the early modern period. They will support their thesis statement using and grouping the documents appropriately.


-Empire-building Jigsaw: Students will work in small groups, each assigned one of the following to create a chart analyzing process of empire-building: Europe (France, Portugal, Spain, England, Holland, Russia, Austria, and Prussia), Islamic Empires (Ottoman Empire, Safavid Empire, Mughal Empire), East Asia (Chinese Ming Empire, Japanese Shogunate), and Africa (West African Forest State, West African Sahel State). Students will then jigsaw for dissemination of information.
*Comparison Essay Workshop #5

Students will write an essay comparing the empire-building process between one European and one Afro-Asiatic Empire (see above).


Daily Homework

Students will read each of the following chapters in Traditions and Encounters, construct an outline for each chapter, identify the chapter terms (these will be provided), and answer the following study questions:



Chapter 22: Examine the nature of the Columbian Exchange. Compare it to other trading systems covered earlier in this class.

Chapter 23: 1) Who were the leading thinkers of the Enlightenment? 2) What role did Martin Luther play in the Protestant Reformation?

Chapter 24: Examine the social structure of colonial life in North America. How was it different from the social structure of colonial life in South America?

Chapter 25: Examine the social structure of colonial life in North America. How was it different from the social structure of colonial life in South America?

Chapter 26: Examine the role of women during the Ming and Qing dynasties. How was footbinding representative of the changing social and gender worlds of China?

Chapter 27: What factors led to the decline and eventual collapse of the Islamic states?

A short reading quiz may be given daily.

Unit 5 (1750-1900) - Industrialization and Global Integration

Days 50-60


Key Concepts

5.1 Industrialization and Global Capital

5.2 Imperialism and Nation-State Formation

5.3 Nationalism, Revolution and Reform

5.4 Global Migration
Major Topics

The Age of Revolutions: English Revolutions, Scientific Revolution & Enlightenment, American Revolution, French Revolution and its fallout in Europe, Haitian & Latin American Revolutions (Comparing the French and Latin American Revolutions)

Global Transformations: Demographic Changes, the End of the Atlantic Slave Trade, Industrial Revolution and Its Impact (Changes in Production in Europe and the Global Impact of those Changes),

Rise of Nationalism, Imperialism and its Impact on the World (Decline of Imperial China and the Rise of Imperial Japan, 19th Century Imperialism: Sub-Saharan Africa, South and Southeast Asia)


Discussions (seminar) and Activities
*Document Analysis and Discussion: Students will analyze documents from MindSparks and discuss how the Industrial Revolution impacted 19th century Western societies, lands colonized by the West, and other non-Western societies.
*Timeline and Documents Analysis: Students will analyze and discuss a timeline of the French Revolution leading up to the Reign of Terror. (The timeline will illustrate the increasing radicalization of the revolution from 1789-1792. (Students should see that the revolution involved many people vying for power, and it wasn't a single effort.) Students will then read and analyze two documents (A Decree Against Profiteers and Law of Suspects) and answer guiding questions. They will share their answers and discuss - What were the motives of the Committee of Public Safety? Did the Committee protect the ideals of the Revolution? Just because someone may have been an enemy of the Committee, did it mean he/she was an enemy of the Revolution?

Sources:
(Timeline from SHEG)

Decree Against Profiteers: Stewart, J.H. (1951). A Documentary survey of the French Revolution, 469–71. New York: Macmillan. Retrieved October 5, 2012, from: http://chnm.gmu.edu/revolution/d/414/

Law of Suspects: Duvergier, J-B. (1793). Collection complète des lois, décrets, ordonnances, règlements, avis du conseil d'état . . . de 1788 a 1830 . . . , 2d ed., 110 vols. Paris. 6:172–73. Retrieved October 5, 2012, from: http://sourcebook.fitchburgstate.edu/history/lawofsuspects.html


*Comparison Essay Workshop #6

Comparing the roles of Women from 1750 to 1900—East Asia, Western Europe, South Asia, Middle East



*DBQ Workshop #4

Utilizing a series of documents, maps and charts in the released DBQ about indentured servitude on in the 19th and 20th centuries, students will discuss the connections between abolition of plantation slavery and increased migrations from Asian countries to the Americas. Students will then write the DBQ essay.


*Images of Imperialism: Students will be shown seven advertisements and illustrations from British books and periodicals on imperialism (from The Human Record, Vol.II). They will answer in writing six questions for analysis and then discuss the questions and their answers.
*CCOT Essay Workshop #3

Describe and explain continuities and changes in religious beliefs and practices in ONE of the following regions from 1450 to 1900.

Sub-Saharan Africa

Latin America/Caribbean


*Discussion: Question of Periodization - Which makes more sense: (1750-1900) or (1750-1914)?
Daily Homework

Students will read each of the following chapters in Traditions and Encounters, construct an outline for each chapter, identify the chapter terms (these will be provided), and answer the following study questions:



Chapter 28: 1) Why was Napoleon successful and why did he eventually fail? 2) Was he a child of the Enlightenment?

Chapter 29: In what ways were families transformed by the process of

industrialization?



Chapter 30: How did the status of women vary between Canada, the U.S., and Latin America?

Chapter 31: Examine the Meiji Restoration. What were its guiding principles?

Chapter 32: 1) What were the legacies of nineteenth-century imperialism? 2) What was anti-colonialism? 3) In what ways is the world shaped today by the actions of nineteenth century imperialists?

A short reading quiz may be given daily.

Unit 6 (1900-present) - Accelerating Global Change and Realignments

Days 61-71


Key Concepts

6.1 Science and the Environment

6.2 Global Conflicts and Their Consequences

6.3 New Conceptualizations of Global Economy, Society and Culture


Major Topics

Crisis and Conflict in the Early 20th Century: Anti-Imperial Movements, World War I (Global Causes and Consequences), Russian, Chinese and Mexican Revolutions (Development of Communism in Russia, China, and Cuba), Depression (Causes and Effects), Rise of Militaristic and Fascist Societies, World War II (Global Causes and Consequences)

Internationalization: Decolonization, the Cold War World, International Organizations, the Post-Cold War World, Globalization


Discussions (seminar) and Activities
*Discussion: Students will discuss the causes, leadership, and results of the Russian and Chinese revolutions. They will address the questions: How were the causes and results similar? Different?
*Students will analyze primary and secondary sources to determine what the role of women was during Ataturk's rule and evaluate whether Ataturk's reforms improved the status of women in Turkey.

(Sources)

Document A: Henry Elisha Allen, The Turkish Transformation: A Study in Social and Religious Development, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1935, pp. 136-37.

Document B & C: Mustafa Kemal Atatürk in Atatürk, Speeches and Statements, II. Retrieved from http://www.kultur.gov.tr/EN,31633/turkish-women.html

Document D: Sabiha Sertel, “’If You Ask Me': Sabiha Sertel's Advice Column, Gender Equity, and Social Engineering in the Early Turkish Republic," Ada Holland Shissler, Journal of Middle East Women's Studies, Vol. 3, No. 2 Spring 20007, p, 18.

Document E: Şirin Tekeli as quoted in "Turkish Women, A Century of Change," by Katharina Knaus, Turkish Policy Quarterly, Spring, 2007, p. 56.


*Comparison Essay Workshop #7

Compare the causes and effects of WWI and WWII.


*Propaganda Assignment: Students will use the search engine of their choice to find at least three WWII propaganda posters - one from the USA, France or Britain, and Germany. They will analyze each of the war posters they chose and prepare an interpretation of the message of the poster. The following questions should be addressed:

-What war issue does the poster address?

-Why was this issue an important issue to the government?

-What tactics were used in the production of this poster to persuade?


*Students will read and analyze primary and secondary sources (including map and timeline) to weigh the options of leaders in 1947 and evaluate the Partition Plan of India.

(Sources)

(Map and timeline from SHEG)

-Jinnah, M.A. (1940, March). Presidential address. Presented at the Muslim League Lahore, India. Retrieved from http://www.columbia.edu/itc/mealac/pritchett/00islamlinks/txt_jinnah_lahore_1940.html

-Nehru, J. 1946. The Discovery of India. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

-Collins, L. and Lapierre, D. (1982). Mountbatten and the Partition of India. U.K.: Garlandfold LTD. (pp. 57-58). http://www.apnaorg.com/books/english/mountbatten-partition/book.php?fldr=book

-Wolpert, S. 2006. Shameful Flight: The Last Years of the British Empire in India. Oxford: Oxford University Press, Inc. (p. 1-2).
*CCOT Essay Workshop #4

Trace the transformation in warfare from 1750 to 2000 CE in any one region: Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Sub-Saharan Africa, East Asia, and Southeast Asia.


*DBQ Workshop #5

Students will use the documents to analyze the goals and roles of women in twentieth century political movements.


*Discussion: After browsing the website http://www.globalization101.org/category/issues-in-depth/human-rights/ and reading how globalization is related to human rights, students will discuss the following:

Why might various regimes oppose human rights and on what basis?

Is the human rights movement a Western replacement to imperialism as a way to exert international political influence?

Have international human rights movements produced political change?


Daily Homework

Students will read each of the following chapters in Traditions and Encounters, construct an outline for each chapter, identify the chapter terms (these will be provided), and answer the following study questions:



Chapter 33: 1) Examine the concept of total war. 2) How was World War I different from earlier wars? 3) How important was the home front?

Chapter 34: 1) Examine the political movement known as fascism. 2) What were its main tenets?

3) Compare fascism to democracy and communism.



Chapter 35: 1) How did Chinese nationalism and communism promote challenges to long-standing Chinese political and cultural traditions, such as those pertaining to peasants and women? 2) How did African participation in the Great War, for example, alter African expectations for their political future?

Chapter 36: 1) In what ways did women transform their roles during the war? 2) What sorts of jobs symbolized these changes? 3) Why did the Cold War turn potentially so hot in Cuba in 1962? 4) What made this superpower contest in Cuba so frightening?

Chapter 37: 1) What happened to India’s traditional belief in non-violence as it gained its independence from Great Britain? 2) As encounters between Muslims and the West increased after WWII, Muslims turned away from the peoples and ways of life outside the Islamic sphere. How did that rejection manifest itself?

Chapter 38: 1) Examine concepts such as Americanization and McDonaldization. 2) How influential is the U. S. in the world today? 3) Why are some countries frightened by this influence?

A short reading quiz may be given daily.

Exam Review

Days 72-80

These days will be used to review for the AP exam and, if necessary, catch up on any material we were unable to cover earlier. Students will work cooperatively to create study guides for each unit. Some students may be absent on some of these days, taking other AP exams. We will discuss scheduling additional review sessions that would be held outside the normal school day.

Useful Internet Sites:

http://www.apcentral.collegeboard.com (all matters relating to AP)

www.glencoe.com/psi (primary source investigator)

www.glencoe.com/bentleyAP5 (textbook online learning center)

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook (extensive statistical info on modern countries collected by the CIA)

http://www.learner.org/courses/worldhistory/audio_glossary.html (Bridging World History - audio glossary pronounces and defines 350 world history terms)

http://www.learner.org/courses/worldhistory/units.html (Bridging World History - has World History videos)

http://www.fordham.edu/Halsall/ (internet history sourcebooks containing extensive primary source documents)


Video Selections – Video material may include (but not be limited to) clips of the following:

CNN Millennium Series

Crash Course World History

History Channel Mankind: The Story of All of Us

History Channel “Engineering an Empire”

Egypt, Greeks, Rome, Carthage, China, Greeks, Persians, Romans, Britain, Maya,

Byzantines, Russians, Da Vinci’s World, Aztecs, Napoleon

History Channel “History Sunday”

Little Ice Age: Big Chill



PBS “Secrets of the Dead”

First Humans

Caveman Cold Case

China’s Terracotta Warriors

Hanging Gardens of Babylon

Dead Sea Scrolls

Great Fire of Rome

The Lost Vikings

Black Death

Mona Lisa

Jamestown

Zulu Dawn

Lost in the Amazon

The Lost Diary of Dr. Livingstone

Deadliest Battle

Churchill’s Deadly Decision

Bugging Hitler’s

World’s Biggest Bomb


PBS “Empires”

Japan: Memoirs of a Secret Empire



National Geographic

Vietnam’s Unseen War

China’s Lost Girls

The New World: Nightmare in Jamestown

Viking Apocalypse

Six Degree Could Change the World

Inside Mecca

Inside the Vatican

Great Inca Rebellion

Secrets of Jerusalem’s Holiest Sites

Guns, Germs, and Steel (1 season)

Dawn of the Maya

Alexander the Great: The Man Behind the Legend

Smithsonian” Mystery Files”

Alexander the Great

King Arthur

Marco Polo

Joan of Arc

Leonardo da Vinci



Smithsonian

Secrets: The Sphinx

“WWII: Final Days”

Nova

Decoding Neanderthals

Mystery of Easter Island

Discovery “Most Evil”

Vlad the Impaler

Ivan the Terrible

Discovery “Who Was Jesus?”

BBC Hiroshima: History of WWII

IMAX “Arabia”

The Adventures of Young Indiana Jones Vol. 1&2, Special Features

Archaeology – Unearthing Our Past

Medicine in the Middle Kingdom

Eastern Spirituality – The Road to Enlightenment

Wanted: Dead or Alive – Pancho Villa and the American Invasion of Mexico

Ancient Questions – Philosophy and Our Search for Meaning

Aristotle – Creating Foundations

The Somme – Storm of Steel

Reading the Enemy’s Mind – Espionage in WWI

The Archduke’s Last Journey – End of an Era

Lines in the Sand – The Middle East and the Great War

Congo – A Curse of Riches

The Russian Revolution – All Power to the Soviets

It’s a Girl (female gendercide)

White Light, Black Rain (Hiroshima and Nagasaki)

Surviving Progress (is the progress stemming from Industrial Age paving way to

civilization’s collapse?

Nicky’s Family (British man saves Jewish children)

No Place on Earth (Jews hiding in Ukrainian caves)

Pompeii: The Last Day

Last Call at the Oasis (world’s water crisis)

Diamonds of War: Africa’s Blood Diamonds

Cave of Forgotten Dreams (cave paintings)

They Call It Myanmar

Day of the Kamikaze

The Devil Came on Horseback (genocide in Darfur)

Alexandria

Iran: The Forgotten Glory

Nanking (atrocities committed by the Japanese - Rated R)

A Crude Awakening: The Oil Crash

Oh, Saigon (family returns to Vietnam after fleeing in 1975)

Art of Conflict (illustrates the conflict in Ireland’s history)

Chevolution (Che Guevara)

Greatest Decisions in Foreign Policy (1 season)

Gladiator (early battle scene)

The Road to 911



Pillars of Faith: Religions of the World


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