Ap world History: Syllabus 2011-2012 Mr. Tom Asbury email



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AP World History: Syllabus 2011-2012

Mr. Tom Asbury

email: tom.asbury@pikeville.kyschools.us
Required Daily Materials: Textbook*, three-ring notebook and paper, writing instruments (black or blue pen and pencil).

(Pencils are on sale in the room for .25 each – Pens are .50 each)


Grades will be earned using the standard PHS grading policies below:


93 - 100 A

83 - 92 B

73 - 82 C

63 - 72 D

0 - 62 F



Student Responsibilities: Students are expected to take active roles in their learning. As active learners, they must:

• complete all assigned homework and classwork on time.

• come to class on time, prepared with textbook *and materials.

• complete all reading assignments before coming to class.

• study for test (get plenty of rest before the test – if you keep up w/your assignments you won’t have to cram)

• label papers correctly with the name, date, assignment, subject and period.

• seek help from fellow students when an absence occurs.

• show respect for themselves, others, and Pikeville High School.

• comply with the cell phone policy by shutting them off and putting them away before entering the classroom.

• consume all snacks before entering the classroom (Water is allowed in the room as long as there is no mess)


My Classroom Policies:

Absences/Late Assignments: Students are expected to be responsible for their assignments and to have them completed and turned in on time. If a student is absent on the day an assignment is given and they have an excused absence, school policy says they have 3 school days to make up the work. It is due on the third day without having to be asked for by the teacher (student responsibility).

If a student is absent on the day an assignment is due (for any reason), the assignment is due the day they walk back into class. My reasoning is that the student already had the assignment. It should have been completed before they had to miss school so they should be able to turn it in when they return. This policy also applies for any absence on the day of a test.
Late work grading policy:

1 school day late -- still acceptable – loss of 10% off the final grade

2 school days late – still acceptable – loss of 20% off the final grade

3 school days late – still acceptable – loss of 30% off the final grade

4 school days late – not acceptable – grade of Zero

So if it’s gonna be late, it better be excellent.


  • Any student who wishes to discuss their grade should make an appointment so that I can give them my full attention.

  • Any student who wishes to ask for an time extension on an assignment needs to be prepared to show me how much work they have already completed before I will make a decision on whether to give an extension or not.


BONUS WORK: Per District policy, bonus work cannot exceed 3% of the total grade. I will have some opportunities for bonus work. If it is offered, students should take advantage of it no matter what their grade is at the time.
Parents as Partners

Encourage your son or daughter to read the newspaper, news magazines, watch news programs and discuss the importance of learning about the development of human societies and connecting current events to topics of study.


Technology

As we move further into the 21st century it is more important that students learn to use the technology they have available to improve their learning. To that point, all students will need to have access to the internet at home. They will be using school-safe programs such as Edmodo and Moodle to communicate about the class work and to take tests. Students will be required to access Edmodo for outside readings. I will scan in the portions of texts (or provide links) that they will need to read to be ready for discussion the next day in class. I will only require small amounts of additional reading since students will already have plenty to read from the textbook.

The only exception to this technology rule will be that all student papers will be written in longhand and in blue or black ink. This is how they will be required to write the essays during the AP Exam in May.
Parent Access to Edmodo

Parents who wish to view their student’s Edmodo account and to stay informed on what is going on in class will be provided with instructions on creating your own login for Edmodo. If you or your student has a smart phone, there is an Edmodo app so that you can access is like Facebook. Contact Mr. A. with any questions.


Textbooks

Once students have been assigned their texts and maps, they are to take them home and keep them there. We will not be reading from the textbook in class and there is no reason for them to carry them back and forth. Textbooks are too heavy as it is. I will take the books back up after the AP Exam in May, unless a student switches out of the class. Any student that does not return their text in the condition it was issued will be required to pay the cost of a replacement book at present day prices.


Course Overview

Advanced Placement World History is a challenging two semester course that is structured around the investigation of selected themes woven into key concepts covering distinct chronological periods. AP World History is equivalent to an introductory college survey course. The course has a three-fold purpose.



  • First, it is designed to prepare students for successful placement into higher-level college and university history courses.

  • Second, it is designed to develop skills of analysis and thinking in order to prepare students for success in the twenty-first century.

  • Finally, it is the intent of this class to make the learning of world history an enjoyable experience. Students will be able to show their mastery of the course goals by taking part in the College Board AP World History Exam in May.




Course Design

Advanced Placement World History is structured around the investigation of five themes woven into 19 key concepts covering six distinct chronological periods. History is a sophisticated quest for meaning about the past, beyond the effort to collect and memorize information. This course will continue to deal with the facts—names, chronology, events, and the like but it will also emphasize historical analysis. This will be accomplished by focusing on four historical thinking skills:



  • crafting historical arguments from historical evidence

  • chronological reasoning

  • comparison and contextualization

  • historical interpretation and synthesis

World history requires the development of thinking skills using the processes and tools that historians employ in order to create historical narrative. Students will also be required to think on many different geographical and temporal scales in order to compare historical events over time and space.

The course relies heavily on college-level resources. This includes texts, a wide variety of primary sources, and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. These resources are designed to develop the skills required to analyze point of view and to interpret evidence to use in creating plausible historical arguments. These tools will also be used to assess issues of change and continuity over time, identifying global processes, comparing within and among societies, and understanding diverse interpretations.
Students will be required to participate in class discussions using the Socratic seminar format. In addition, students will be responsible for preparing class presentations in order to further develop higher level habits of mind or thinking skills and broaden content knowledge. The course emphasis is on balancing global coverage, with no more than 20% of course time devoted to European history. This course is designed to be rigorous and rewarding, inviting students to take a global view of historical processes and contacts between people in different societies.
The five AP World History Themes that connect the key concepts throughout the course and serve as the foundation for student reading, writing, and presentation requirements are as follows:
Theme 1: Interaction Between Humans and the Environment: Demography and disease, Migration, Patterns of settlement, Technology

Theme 2: Development and Interaction of Cultures: Religions, Belief systems, philosophies, and ideologies, Science and technology, The arts and architecture
Theme 3: State-building, Expansion, and Conflict: Political structures and forms of governance, Empires, Nations and nationalism, Revolts and revolutions, Regional, trans-regional, and global structures and organizations
Theme 4: Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems: Agricultural and pastoral production, Trade and commerce, Labor systems, Industrialization, Capitalism and Socialism
Theme 5: Development and Transformation of Social Structures: Gender roles and relations, Family and kinship, Racial and ethnic constructions, Social and economic classes
Materials

College Level Text: Strayer, Robert W. Ways of the World: A Global History. Boston: Bedford/ St. Martin’s, 2009.


A variety of other reading and resources utilized throughout the course include:

  • Adas, Michael, Marc J. Gilbert, Peter Stearns, and Stuart B. Schwartz. World Civilizations: The Global Experience. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

  • Fernandez-Armesto, Felipe. The World: A History, Combined Volume. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2007

  • Bentley, Jerry and Herbert Ziegler. Traditions and Encounters: A Global Perspective on the Past. New York: McGraw-Hill.

  • Bulliet, Richard, Daniel R. Headrick, David Northrup, Lyman L. Johnson, and Pamela Kyle Crossley. The Earth and Its Peoples: A Global History. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

  • Spodek, Howard. World’s History. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

  • Lockard, Craig A. Societies, Networks, and Transitions: A Global History. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2008.

  • Worlds of History –A Comparative Reader Third Edition by Kevin Reilly. Boston: Bedford/ St. Martin’s, 2009.

  • The World that Trade Created by Kenneth Pomeranz, M.E. Sharpe; 2000.

  • Guns, Germs, & Steel by Jared Diamond. W.W. Norton Company; 1997 (T.V. Show –PBS on YouTube)

  • The Extraordinary Voyages of Admiral Cheng Ho by Nora C. Buckley. History Today; July 1975.

  • Southernization by Lynda Shaffer at Tufts University. Journal of World History; 1994.


Unit Activities

The following activities will be utilized in each of the six units in order to develop the historical analysis necessary to establish a sophisticated quest for meaning about the past.



  • Tag Team Teaching

Students will be divided into five or six groups each unit. These groups correspond to the AP World History key concepts. The students will be given “workshop” days where they will be expected to consult a variety of sources along with regular class texts. Students consider and analyze the different themes and periodizations that are contained in these sources and record their findings on Unit Focus Sheets in categories mirroring the AP World History themes. Students will identify continuities from previous studies, as well as, the nature and causes of change as they apply to their assigned topic. Students will also evaluate multiple causes and consequences of the main historical developments represented in the textbooks. Using an inverted pyramid approach, students will prioritize their most important information. The goal is to synthesize information into five listings per identified heading. Students will use this information to prepare a PowerPoint presentation for their classmates. Students are required to cite the information used on their slides and they must be able to answer questions and justify their selections.

  • Writing Assignments

Each unit includes writing assignments designed to develop the skills necessary for creating well-evidenced essays on historical topics highlighting clarity and precision.

  • Short Document Analysis: Students analyze three documents (one written, one visual and one quantitative) from the course primary source readers. For instance, in Unit 1, students will analyze sources for point of view, intended purpose, audience, and historical context of each source. These skills of primary source analysis will be applied throughout the course.

  • Document Based Question (DBQ): Students analyze evidence from a variety of sources in order to develop a coherent written argument that has a thesis supported by relevant historical evidence. Students will apply multiple historical thinking skills as they examine a particular historical problem or question.

  • Change and Continuity Over Time (CCOT): Students identify and analyze patterns of continuity and change over time and across geographic regions. They will also connect these historical developments to specific circumstances of time and place, and to broader regional, national, or global processes.

  • Comparative Essay: Students compare historical developments across or within societies in various chronological and/or geographical contexts. Students will also synthesize information by connecting insights from one historical context to another, including the present.

  • Text Timeline Review

The Text Timeline Review is an activity that will be completed by the end of each unit. The reason for this activity is to address chronological thinking. According to the authors of the National Standards for History, “chronological thinking is the heart of historical reasoning.” This activity requires students to use the chronological timeline of their textbook as a baseline for the other primary and secondary source materials they encounter in their readings, research, and other studies. The students will place items from these other sources onto the timeline associated with their textbook. Students will then be asked to write their responses to the following prompts at the bottom of their timeline:

  • What is the relationship between the causes and consequences of the events or processes identified on the completed timeline?

  • Discuss the contradictions/inconsistencies between the textbook’s chronological timeline and that of the other sources.

  • Learning Log

Each unit, the student will write a reflective commentary discussing how the history of the (identified) region or era fits into the larger story of world history. These commentaries should be three to five paragraphs in length and will be submitted in the student notebook or via Edmodo (www.pikeville.edmodo.com). This is not a place to put notes, but rather to think about what you really learned concerning “contextualization.” It also allows the student to continue to refine their abilities to develop a written argument and analyze patterns of continuity and change over time.

  • Point/Counterpoint

Students will use the Socratic seminar format in each unit to explore key controversies in world history from ancient times to the present. The foundation for these conversations will be Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Controversial Issues in World Civilizations. This book examines issues that allow students to identify and evaluate diverse historical interpretations by introducing students to controversies in world civilizations. This debate style reader contains readings representing the arguments of leading historians and commentators on world history and reflects a variety of viewpoints presented in pro/con format. All of the topics/questions listed in each unit for this activity come from this book.

  • World History Artifact Posting Assignment

Each student will discover a historical artifact that they believe represents the unit and topic being studied. The teacher will set parameters each unit for these artifacts in order to ensure that students recognize that the study of history has been shaped by the findings and methods of other disciplines (archeology, visual arts, geography, and political science). They will then post an image of the artifact along with a discussion that identifies the artifact (who, what, when, where, why significant) and addresses what the artifact says (indicates, suggests) about politics, society or culture in the time and place it was made. Classmates will then use the elements of critical thinking to organize class discussion via Edmodo. Each student in the class will be required to ask a question about the artifact that seeks to increase the clarity, accuracy and precision of the conversation. The student posting the artifact must then answer the questions posed. Answering these questions may require further research. Questions and answers should demonstrate that the respective authors put honest thought into both the question and the answer. Throughout, students must cite the sources of the information provided. The initial artifact posts are due after the unit has been studied for one week. Classmates writing queries should post their questions from that point until the end of the unit.
Unit Course Planner

UNIT ONE: Technological and Environmental Transformations

PERIODIZATION: c. 8000 BCE to c. 600 BCE

MAIN FOCUS: Beginnings in History

LENGTH OF CLASS TIME FOR UNIT: 6.5 Days

READING TEXT: Ways of the World: A Global History. Chapters 1 – 3


Key Concepts:

Key Concept 1.1: Big Geography and the Peopling of the Earth

I. Paleolithic migrations lead to the spread of technology and culture



Key Concept 1.2:The Neolithic Revolution and Early Agricultural Societies

I. Neolithic Revolution leads to new and more complex economic and social systems

II. Agricultural and pastoralism begins to transform human society

Key Concept 1.3:The Development and Interactions of Early Agricultural, Pastoral, and Urban Societies

I. Location of early foundational civilizations

II. State development and expansion

III. Cultural development in the early civilizations


Unit 1 Major Assignments:

  1. TEXT READING ASSIGNMENT: Ways of the World: A Global History. Chapters 1 – 3

  2. TAG TEAM TEACHING: Students will prepare to present this unit. They will be introduced to the How Historians Work packet and activities (source, classification, value auction, Vikings, shapes and memory, class history, garbageology, drawing conclusions, Bob Seger’s Revisionism Street); Teacher will review group presentation approach, requirements, and rubric. Teacher will also explain how to use the themed unit focus sheets along with power point expectations. Students will practice presentation skills by preparing presentations on Big History, Human Migration, Scythians, Indo-European languages, Semitic languages, Hunter-gatherers, Pastoralism, Neolithic Revolution, Metallurgy, Sumer, Nubia, Indus Valley Civilization, Zhou Dynasty, Olmec, Chavín culture, Sargon of Akkad, Ziggurat, and other topics identified in the key concepts.

  3. WRITING ASSIGNMENTS: Students will begin preliminary work on how to write a Change and Continuity Over Time essay (My Life since 5th Grade). Hand out Essay Writing Packet and begin serious work on the CCOT essay.

  4. TEXT TIMELINE REVIEW: See Unit Activities explanation regarding this activity.

  5. LEARNING LOG: Write a reflective commentary considering the role of human migration during this era and its connection to the larger story of world history.

  6. SHORT PRIMARY SOURCE ANALYSIS: Teacher will model activity by having students analyze the following textual, visual, and data sources: creation stories in the Rig Veda, Popul Vuh, and Bible; Epic of Gilgamesh, the Egyptian Book of the Dead. The source analysis will include identifying point of view, intended purpose, audience, and historical context of each source.

  7. POINT/COUNTERPOINT: Students will be introduced to the workings of Socratic Seminar. See Unit Activities explanation regarding this activity. Taking Sides topics: Did Homo Sapiens Originate in Africa? Did Egyptian Civilization Originate in Africa?

  8. WORLD HISTORY ARTIFACT POSTING ASSIGNMENT: See Unit Activities explanation regarding this activity. Object must be connected to the field of archaeology, e.g. Neolithic Venus statues or archaeological data from Jericho. Students will learn how to question the historical context of sources and assess the reliability and validity of the information for specific historical questions.





UNIT TWO: Organization and Reorganization of Human Societies

PERIODIZATION: c. 600 BCE to c.600 CE

MAIN FOCUS: The Classical Era in World History

LENGTH OF CLASS TIME FOR UNIT: 18.5 days

READING TEXT: Ways of the World: A Global History. Chapters 4 – 7
Key Concepts:

Key Concept 2.1: The Development and Codification of Religious and Cultural Traditions

I. Codifications and further developments of existing religious traditions

II. Emergence, diffusion, and adaptation of new religious and cultural traditions

III. Belief systems affect gender roles

IV. Other religious and cultural traditions continue

V. Artistic expressions show distinctive cultural developments



Key Concept 2.2: The Development of States and Empires

I. Imperial societies grow dramatically

II. Techniques of imperial administration

III. Social and economic dimensions of imperial societies

IV. Decline, collapse, and transformation of empires (Rome, Han, Maurya)

Key Concept 2.3: Emergence of Trans-regional Networks of Communication and Exchange

I. The geography of trans-regional networks, communication and exchange networks

II. Technologies of long-distance communication and exchange

III. Consequences of long-distance trade


Unit 2 Major Assignments:

  1. TEXT READING ASSIGNMENT: Ways of the World: A Global History. Chapters 4 – 7

  2. TAG TEAM TEACHING: Students will present this unit. Student groups will research and make presentations using the tools and guidelines established in Unit 1. Presentation groups will include explaining political and cultural developments in: Southwest Asia, East.

  3. Asia, South Asia, Mediterranean region, Mesoamerica, and Andean South America

  4. WRITING ASSIGNMENTS: Students will begin work on how to write a comparative essay. Possible prompts include: Compare the basic features of two classical civilizations: Mesoamerica, India, China, Greece, or Rome; Compare two of the following major religions or philosophical systems: Historical Vedic religions, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Judaism, Christianity, or Greco-Roman philosophy; Compare the reasons for and the outcomes of the fall of two classical civilizations: Rome, Han China, and the Gupta. Students will also re-visit the CCOT essay and rubric.

  5. TEXT TIMELINE REVIEW: See Unit Activities explanation regarding this activity.

  6. LEARNING LOG: Write a reflective commentary considering trans-regional networks of communication and exchange and the consequences of long-distance trade during this era and its connection to the larger story of world history.

  7. SHORT PRIMARY SOURCE ANALYSIS: The source analysis will include identifying point of view, intended purpose, audience, and historical context of each source. Sources include descriptions of travel or trade (Periplus of the Erythraean Sea or Journeys of Faxian); Roman, Han, or Gupta coins; Leviticus, Twelve Tables, or The Analects

  8. POINT/COUNTERPOINT: Students will use skills introduced in Unit 1 regarding the Socratic Seminar. Taking Sides topics: Does Alexander the Great merit his exalted reputation? Did the benefits of the First Emperor of China’s rule outweigh the human cost? Did Christianity liberate women?

  9. WORLD HISTORY ARTIFACT POSTING ASSIGNMENT: See Unit Activities explanation regarding this activity. Object must be connected to artistic expression (literature, architecture, or sculpture), e.g. examples of architecture in Mediterranean, Middle East, South Asia, East Asia, or Mesoamerica; Greek sculpture, Buddhist art, or Moche art. Students will learn how to question the historical context of sources and assess the reliability and validity of the information for specific historical questions.




  • UNIT TWO TEST: 70 multiple choice questions, In-class essay on analyzing comparisons or changes over time.


UNIT THREE: Regional and Transregional Interactions

PERIODIZATION: c. 600 CE-c.1450

MAIN FOCUS: A Time of Accelerating Connections

LENGTH OF CLASS TIME FOR UNIT: 24 days

READING TEXT: Ways of the World: A Global History. Chapters 8 – 13
Key Concepts: Key Concept 3.1: Expansion and Intensification of Communication and Exchange Networks

I. Improved transportation technologies and commercial practices and their influence on networks

II. Linguistic and environmental contexts for the movement of peoples

III. Cross-cultural exchanges fostered by networks of trade and communication

IV. Continued diffusion of crops and pathogens throughout the Eastern Hemisphere

Key Concept 3.2: Continuity and Innovation in State Forms and Their Interactions

I. Empires collapse and were reconstituted

II. Greater inter-regional contacts and conflict encourages technology and cultural transfer

Key Concept 3.3: Increased Economic Productive Capacity and Its Consequences

I. Increasing productive capacity in agriculture and industry

II. Changes in urban demography

III. Changes and continuities in labor systems and social structures


Unit 3 Major Assignments:

  1. TEXT READING ASSIGNMENT: Ways of the World: A Global History. Chapters 8 – 13

  2. TAG TEAM TEACHING: Student groups will research and make presentations on: development of political institutions in the Islamic World (Abbasid Caliphate, Seljuq empire, sultanate of Delhi, Mali Empire), Central Asia (Mongol Khanates), East Asia (Tang and Song dynasties), Latin West and Byzantine Empire, Africa (Swahili city-states and Great Zimbabwe), South and Southeast Asia, Mesoamerica and the Andes; social and cultural effects of interactions due to the Crusades, Mongols, Hanseatic League, Bantu peoples, Vikings, Polynesians, and Bedouins; importance of travelers such as Marco Polo and Ibn Battuta; role of new cities such as Timbuktu, Tenochtitlan, or Cordoba; influence of new ideas and technologies: Neo-Confucianism, printing, gunpowder, and medical responses to the bubonic plague and other diseases

  3. WRITING ASSIGNMENTS: Students will continue work on how to write essays that compare historical developments and assess the effects of changes over time. Possible prompts include questions from previous released AP exams: Compare European and sub-Saharan African contacts with the Islamic world; Essay: Compare Aztec Empire and Inca Empire; Compare Japanese and European feudalism; Compare effects of Islam and Christianity on social systems and gender roles; Compare developments in political and social institutions in both eastern and western Europe; Assess the effects of the spread of Islam up to 1750; Students also will learn how to incorporate analysis of primary sources into their written arguments. Practice using the DBQ on the spread of Buddhism to China

  4. TEXT TIMELINE REVIEW: See Unit Activities explanation regarding this activity.

  5. LEARNING LOG: Write a reflective commentary considering the continued diffusion of flora, fauna, and pathogens throughout the Eastern Hemisphere during this era and its connection to the larger story of world history using statistics on mortality rates from the fourteenth century bubonic plague pandemic.

  6. SHORT PRIMARY SOURCE ANALYSIS: The source analysis will include identifying point of view, intended purpose, audience, and historical context of each source. Sources include excerpts from the travel books of Marco Polo and Ibn Battuta and the Secret History of the Mongols

  7. POINT/COUNTERPOINT: Students will employ Socratic Seminar strategy. Taking Sides topics: Does the modern University have its roots in the Islamic World? Were environmental factors responsible for the collapse of Mayan civilization? Were the

  8. Crusades an early example of western imperialism? Did women and men benefit equally from the Renaissance?

  9. WORLD HISTORY ARTIFACT POSTING ASSIGNMENT: See Unit Activities explanation regarding this activity. Object must be connected to political power, e.g. images from Rashid al-Din Fadl Allah’s book on the Mongols or maps of Cairo, Baghdad, Delhi, and Florence.




  • UNIT THREE TEST: 70 multiple choice questions, DBQ in-class essay


UNIT FOUR: Global Interactions

PERIODIZATION: c. 1450 to c.1750

MAIN FOCUS: The Early Modern World

LENGTH OF CLASS TIME FOR UNIT: 24 days

READING TEXT: Ways of the World: A Global History. Chapters 14 – 16
KEY CONCEPTS:

Key Concept 4.1: Globalizing Networks of Communication and Exchange

I. Intensification of regional trade networks (Mediterranean, trans-Saharan, overland Eurasian and Siberian trade routes)

II. Trans-oceanic maritime reconnaissance

III. New maritime commercial patterns



  • Technological developments enabling trans-oceanic trade

  • Environmental exchange and demographic trends: Columbian Exchange

VI. Spread and reform of religion

VII. Global and regional networks and the development of new forms of art and expression



Key Concept 4.2: New Forms of Social Organization and Modes of Production

I. Labor systems and their transformations

II. Changes and continuities in social hierarchies and identities

Key Concept 4.3: State Consolidation and Imperial Expansion

I. Techniques of state consolidation

II. Imperial expansion

III. Competition and conflict among and within States


Unit 4 Major Assignments:

  1. TEXT READING ASSIGNMENT: Ways of the World: A Global History. Chapters 14 – 16

  2. TAG TEAM TEACHING: Student groups will research and make presentations. Presentation groups will be responsible for explaining: the political and cultural developments in Spain, Portugal, France, England, Holland, Russia, Ottoman Empire, Ming and Qing China, Tokugawa Japan, Mughal Empire, West and East African polities, Safavid Empire, Aztec and Incan empires; economic effects of cod fisheries, mercantilism, astrolabe, caravels, Columbian Exchange, and new labor systems (encomienda, indentured servitude, janissaries, chattel slavery in the Americas)

  3. WRITING ASSIGNMENTS: Students will continue work on how to write essays. Possible prompts include questions from previous released AP exams: Compare coercive labor systems: slavery and other coercive labor systems in the Americas; economic and social effects of the Columbian Exchange; DBQ on the Global flow of silver; Analyze imperial systems: European monarchy compared with a land-based Asian empire (China or Japan); Compare Russia’s interaction with the West with the interaction of the West and one of the following: Ottoman Empire, China, Tokugawa Japan, Mughal India

  4. TEXT TIMELINE REVIEW: See Unit Activities explanation regarding this activity.

  5. LEARNING LOG: Write a reflective commentary considering the impact of the Columbian Exchange during this era and its connection to the larger story of world history.

  6. SHORT PRIMARY SOURCE ANALYSIS: The source analysis will include identifying point of view, intended purpose, audience, and historical context of each source. Sources include: Ma Huan, De Las Casas, Codex Mendosa, Letters from the King of Kongo

  7. POINT/COUNTERPOINT: Students will employ Socratic Seminar strategy. Taking Sides topics: Should Christopher Columbus be considered a hero? Did Tokugawa policies strengthen Japan? Did Oliver Cromwell advance political freedom in seventeenth-century Europe? Did Indian Emperor Aurangzeb’s rule mark the beginning of Mughal decline? Did Peter the Great exert a positive influence on the development of Europe?

  8. WORLD HISTORY ARTIFACT POSTING ASSIGNMENT: See Unit Activities explanation regarding this activity. Object must be connected to Trans-oceanic trade e.g. images of caravels, dhows, Ming Treasure Ship fleet, Polynesian outrigger canoes, and tools used to facilitate the trade (coins, maps, compasses, astrolabes, and sails)




  • UNIT FOUR TEST: 70 multiple choice questions, in-class essay drawn from either the past Compare/Contrast, CCOT, or DBQ formats.


UNIT FIVE: Industrialization and Global Integration

PERIODIZATION: c. 1750 to c. 1900

MAIN FOCUS: The European Moment in World History

LENGTH OF CLASS TIME FOR UNIT: 24 days

READING TEXT: Ways of the World: A Global History. Chapters 17 – 20
Key Concepts:

Key Concept 5.1: Industrialization and Global Capitalism

I. Industrialization

II. New patterns of global trade and production

III. Transformation of capital and finance



  1. Revolutions in transportation and communication: Railroads, steamships, canals, telegraph

  2. Reactions to the spread of global capitalism

VI. Social transformations in industrialized societies

Key Concept 5.2: Imperialism and Nation-State Formation

I. Imperialism and colonialism of trans-oceanic empires by industrializing powers

II. State formation and territorial expansion and contraction

III. Ideologies and imperialism



Key Concept 5.3: Nationalism, Revolution, and Reform

I. The rise and diffusion of Enlightenment thought

II. 18th century peoples develop a sense of commonality

III. Spread of Enlightenment ideas propels reformist and revolutionary movements



  • Enlightenment ideas spark new transnational ideologies and solidarities

Key Concept 5.4: Global Migration

I. Demography and urbanization

II. Migration and its motives

III. Consequences of and reactions to migration


Unit 5 Major Assignments:

  1. TEXT READING ASSIGNMENT: Ways of the World: A Global History. Chapters 17 – 20

  2. SHORT PRIMARY SOURCE ANALYSIS: The source analysis will include identifying point of view, intended purpose, audience, and historical context of each source. Sources might include excerpts from: Locke, Montesquieu, Declaration of Independence, Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen, Jamaica Letter, Adam Smith, and Karl Marx; statistics about bonded labor migrations from Asia to the Americas and Africa.

  3. TAG TEAM TEACHING: Student groups will research and make presentations. Presentation groups will be responsible for the following topics: Seven Years’ War, Napoleonic Wars, Great Game in Central Asia, Berlin Conference, Opium Wars, Zulu, Formation of Hawaii, German and Italian Unification, Meiji restoration, Abolition, Marxism, Indian National Congress, Industrialization; Migration Suffrage, Scientific Revolution, Atlantic revolutions, Latin America Independence movements, Boxer Rebellion, Indian Revolt of 1857, Taiping rebellion, Wahhabi Movement, Tanzimat, Self-Strengthening movement, Liberalism, Socialism, Communism, Anarchism, pan-Slavism, pan-Islamism, Factory System, and Second Industrial revolution

  4. WRITING ASSIGNMENTS: Students will continue work on how to write essays. Possible prompts include questions from previous released AP exams: DBQ- Indentured servitude; Development of Global trade patterns, 1750-1914; Compare the French and Haitian Revolutions; Compare reaction to foreign domination in the Ottoman Empire, China, India, and Japan; Compare nationalism, e.g., China and Japan, Cuba and the Philippines, Egypt and Nigeria; Compare forms of Western intervention in Latin America and in Africa; Compare the roles and conditions of women in the upper/middle classes with peasantry/working class in Western Europe; Compare the causes and social impact of the Industrial Revolution in Western Europe and Japan

  5. TEXT TIMELINE REVIEW: See Unit Activities explanation regarding this activity.

  6. LEARNING LOG: Write a reflective commentary considering the roots and influences of Enlightenment thought during this era and its connection to the larger story of world history

  7. SHORT PRIMARY SOURCE ANALYSIS: The source analysis will include identifying point of view, intended purpose, audience, and historical context of each source. Sources might include excerpts from: Locke, Montesquieu, Declaration of Independence, Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen, Jamaica Letter, Adam Smith, and Karl Marx; statistics about bonded labor migrations from Asia to the Americas and Africa.

  8. POINT/COUNTERPOINT: Students will employ Socratic Seminar strategy. Taking Sides topics: Did the West define the modern world? Was the French Revolution worth its human costs? Did the Meiji Revolution Constitute a revolution in nineteenth-century Japan? Were Confucian values responsible for China’s failure to modernize?

  9. WORLD HISTORY ARTIFACT POSTING ASSIGNMENT: See Unit Activities explanation regarding this activity. Object must be connected to industrialization e.g. images of factories in England, USA, France, and Japan showing the size of the steam-powered machines and women working in the factories; images of industrial cities with air or water pollution; political cartoons about American imperialism related to the Spanish-American war that affected Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Philippines, and Guam.




  • UNIT FIVE TEST: 70 multiple choice questions, in-class essay drawn from either the past Compare/Contrast, CCOT, or DBQ formats.


UNIT SIX: Accelerating Global Change and Realignments PERIODIZATION: c. 1900 to the present MAIN FOCUS: The most recent century LENGTH OF CLASS TIME FOR UNIT: 24 days READING TEXT: Ways of the World: A Global History. Chapters 21 – 24
Key Concepts:

Key Concept 6.1: Science and the Environment

I. Rapid advances in science spread assisted by new technology

II. Humans change their relationship with the environment

III. Disease, scientific innovations, and conflict led to demographic shifts



Key Concept 6.2: Global Conflicts and Their Consequences

I. Europe’s domination gives way to new forms of political organization

II. Emerging ideologies of anti-imperialism contribute to dissolution of empires

III. Political changes accompanied by demographic and social consequences

IV. Military conflicts escalate

V. Individual and groups oppose, as well as, intensify the conflict


Key Concept 6.3: New Conceptualizations of Global Economy, Society, and Culture

I. States, communities and individuals become increasingly interdependent

II. People conceptualize society and culture in new ways

III. Popular and consumer culture become global



Unit 6 Major Assignments:

  1. TEXT READING ASSIGNMENT: Ways of the World: A Global History. Chapters 21 – 24

  2. TAG TEAM TEACHING: Students will be making individual presentations this unit. Topics include: WWI, WWII, Cold War, International Organizations, Decolonization in Algeria, Decolonization in sub-Saharan Africa, economic developments in Argentina/ Brazil, Cuban Revolution, Great Depression, economic developments in the Pacific Rim, Communism in Russia and China, Feminist movements, globalization, Indian/ Pakistani Partition, Jewish settlement/Palestine, Irish partition, Great Depression, Gurkha soldiers, ANZAC troops, Nuclear weapons, Marshall Plan, NATO, Warsaw Pact, Bandung Conference, Genocides, Civil Rights Movements, Green movements, World Bank, NAFTA, European Union, Quantum Mechanics, Antibiotics, and HIV/AIDS.

  3. WRITING ASSIGNMENTS: Students will continue work on how to write essays. Possible prompts include questions from previous released AP exams: Compare the notion of the “East” and the “West” in Cold War ideology; DBQ- Muslim Nationalist Movements; Choose two revolutions (Russian, Chinese, Cuban, Iranian) and compare their effects on the roles of women; Compare the causes and effects of the World Wars on areas outside of Europe; Compare legacies of colonialism and patterns of economic development in two of the following regions: Asia, Latin America, Africa; Compare patterns and results of decolonization in Africa and India

  4. TEXT TIMELINE REVIEW: See Unit Activities explanation regarding this activity.

  5. LEARNING LOG: Write a reflective commentary considering social movements during this era and its connection to the larger story of world history.

  6. SHORT PRIMARY SOURCE ANALYSIS: The source analysis will include identifying point of view, intended purpose, audience, and historical context of each source. Sources might include excerpts from Gandhi, Nkrumah, and Ho Chi Min; data on the growth of outsourcing and business cycles of multinational corporations in the twentieth and twenty first centuries

  7. POINT/COUNTERPOINT: Students will employ Socratic Seminar strategy. Taking Sides topics: Did the Bolshevik Revolution improve the lives of Soviet women? Was Stalin responsible for the Cold War? Does Islam revivalism challenge a secular world order? Should Africa’s leaders be blamed for the continent’s current problems? Were ethnic leaders responsible for the disintegration of Yugoslavia? Will the Oslo Peace Accords benefit both Israelis and Palestinians?

  8. WORLD HISTORY ARTIFACT POSTING ASSIGNMENT: See Unit Activities explanation regarding this activity. Object must be connected to advances in science and technology e.g. CERN collider, small pox and polio vaccination delivery programs, atomic bombs, or computers.

  • Unit 6 test: 70 multiple choice questions, in-class essay drawn from either the past Compare/Contrast, CCOT, or DBQ formats.

REVIEW SESSIONS PRIOR TO AP WORLD HISTORY EXAMINATION. After-school time will be spent reviewing major concepts and ideas from all the units, including essay strategies. Review sessions will be offered on selected days after school. Attendance at the review sessions is recommended, but voluntary.

PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS A PLAN FOR THE CLASS BUT ALL PLANS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. I MAY FIND NEW INFORMATION THAT I WISH TO SHARE AND SOME THAT I MAY DELETE. I RESERVE THAT RIGHT.


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