Anth 121: Physical Anthropology Spring 2014, crn 31948 tr 5: 10 – 6: 35 pm ew 204



Download 41.03 Kb.
Date02.06.2016
Size41.03 Kb.
Anth 121: Physical Anthropology

Spring 2014, CRN 31948

TR 5:10 – 6:35 pm EW 204

Instructor: Dr. Sarah King



Sarah.King1@cerrocoso.edu

 Phone: (760) 384-6124

 

Student Contact Hours: Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:30 – 5:00 pm, Room 319 C


I will also be available through email Monday - Friday, but am unlikely to respond after 6pm (PST). I will normally reply to emails within 48 hours (not counting weekends and holidays).
Course Description:

Physical Anthropology is the study of humankind from the biological perspective. Topics range from early primate fossils to modern forensic research. This course examines humans as biological organisms from an evolutionary perspective. Areas covered include concepts, methods, findings, and issues in the study of the order primates, including relationships between fossil monkeys, apes and humans, and the significance of genetic diversity between modern populations. At the completion of this course, you will have the ability to:



  • Discuss the theory of natural selection as proposed by Charles Darwin.

  • Identify living primates species and discuss their social organizations, behavior and language ability.

  • Describe the sequence of hominin evolution and discuss the fossil evidence.

  • Analyze the place of humanity in nature including the physical differences in humans.


A quick note:

This class covers human origins and evolution from a scientific perspective. As part of the course, you will be expected to understand and discuss the topics using scientific evidence. Religious texts are not appropriate sources of evidence and may only be quoted in limited contexts. I require that everyone keep an open mind and be ready to learn about some of the exciting ideas that Physical anthropology presents. If you feel you can’t because of personal reasons, then this course may not be the right fit for you.


Disability Accommodation:

The college will make reasonable accommodations and/or academic adjustments to ensure that students with disabilities have an equal opportunity to participate in the college’s courses. Students with disabilities, who are requesting academic accommodations, auxiliary aides or services, should contact Access Services at 760-384-6250.



Required Text:
Larsen, C.S. 2011. Our Origins: discovering physical anthropology 2nd ed. New York: W.W. Norton & Company.
Additional readings and articles may be assigned throughout the course.
Class Moodle:

There is a Moodle site set up for this course. The site will allow you to access the syllabus, download extra material and check your progress throughout the semester.


Course Requirements: The average workload for a 3.0 unit course is 6 hrs a week outside of class time. This course will consist of three multiple choice exams, a cumulative final, a 1500 word essay, and one presentation. The grading break down will be as follows:
(100 pts) Essay: The topic and guidelines for this essay will be handed out in week 1 and due online Friday May 9th. The paper will be 1500 words (roughly 7-10 pages) and must reference at least 6 outside sources. Papers must be submitted to Turnitin.com.
(70 pts) Essay prep: You will submit elements of your essay throughout the semester.  These elements include an annotated bibliography (20 pts), a detailed outline (20 pts), and a rough draft (30 pts).  The guidelines for these will be handed out in week 2. All assignments will be turned in via the class moodle. 
(30 pts) Presentation: This will be an oral presentation based on a group project and presented in front of class during finals week May 13th at 5:00 pm. Each group will be responsible for a presentation 15-20 min in length.
(100 pts) Exam 1: Tuesday February 25th. This is a multiple choice and short answer exam covering the material from week 1-5. There are no make up exams allowed for any reason.
(100 pts) Exam 2: Tuesday April 8th. This is a multiple choice and short answer exam covering the material from week 6-10. There are no make up exams allowed for any reason.
(100 pts) Exam 3: Thursday May 8th. This is a multiple choice and short answer exam covering the material from week 11-15. There are no make up exams allowed for any reason.
 *Assignment grades will be posted 1-2 weeks after the final submission date.
*There will be an extra credit assignment available at the end of the semester worth a maximum of 10pts.
 Late assignment policy:  Late exams will not be accepted for any reason.  Essay and essay prep assignments will be considered late immediately after the submission deadline passes. They will drop the equivalent of one letter grade for each 24 hr period after the deadline. 
 

Grading Rubric: A passing grade for this course is a C.

 

A: 90 – 100% - Exceptional work that the goes beyond basic requirements and demonstrates a thorough understanding of the ideas and topics covered in the course. Assignments are clearly articulated displaying originality, critical thinking skills and significant use of outside resources.



 

B: 80 – 89% - Good work that meets the basic requirements and demonstrates a thorough understanding of the ideas and topics covered in the course. Assignments are clearly articulated displaying some originality, critical thinking skills, and good use of outside resources.

 

C: 70 – 79% - Work meets basic requirements and demonstrates and basic understanding of the ideas and topics covered in the course. Assignments show an adequate composition and critical thinking skills with some use of outside resources.



 

D: 60 – 69% - Work meets some of the requirements and demonstrates partial understanding of the ideas and topics covered in the course. Assignments must show critical thinking, but may not be articulated in a clear manner. There is little to no use of outside resources.



 

F: <60% - Work does not meet requirements or demonstrate an understanding of the ideas and topics covered in the course. There is no evidence of critical thinking or use of outside resources.



 Course Schedule:

Unit

Date

Topic

Reading

1

1/21 – 1/24

What is Anthropology?

Chapter 1

2

1/27 – 1/31

Origins of Evolution

Chapter 2

3

2/3 – 2/7

Cells and Genes

Chapter 3

4

2/10 – 2/14

Population Genetics

Chapter 4

5

2/17 – 2/21

The Skeleton

Kelly 2011

6

2/24 – 2/28

Exam 1




7

3/3 – 3/7

Human Adaptation

Chapter 5

8

3/10 – 3/14

Primate Biology

Chapter 6

9

3/17 – 3/21

Primate Behavior

Chapter 7




3/22 – 3/28

Spring Break




10

3/31 – 4/4

Studying the Past

Chapter 8

11

4/7 – 4/11

Primate Origins

Chapter 9

12

4/14 – 4/18

Human Origins

Chapter 10

13

4/21 – 4/25

Genus Homo

Chapter 11

14

4/28 – 5/2

Archaic and Modern Homo sapiens

Chapter 12

15

5/5 – 5/9

Recent Past

Chapter 13

Finals

5/12 – 5/16

 Finals

None

 

Important dates:

Jan 20th – Martin Luther King Jr. Day (online classes operate as usual)



Feb 2nd – Census Date (Last day to drop with nothing appearing on your record)

Feb 14th & 17th - Lincoln and Washington’s Holidays (online classes operate as usual)



March 27th – 60% day (Last day to drop with a “W”)

May 16th – Last day of semester

 

Drop policy: Prior to the 60% date, any student who is inactive for 14 days or more will be dropped from the course. In order to remain in the course, you must attend regularly AND participate in class activities.  This includes reading the assigned material, participating in class discussions and taking the exams.  If for some reason you are not able to attend for a two-week period, contact me ASAP to avoid being dropped.  
Plagiarism policy: Plagiarism (from the official definition approved by the board of trustees) is defined as the act of using the ideas or work of another person or persons as if they were one’s own, without giving credit to the source.

Plagiarism is a violation of the Student Conduct Policy and will not be tolerated. Any plagiarized work will receive no credit and I shall notify Student Services.


Plagiarism can easily be avoided by doing your own work and referencing sources properly. Guidelines for the proper method of citing sources shall be hand out in week 1 with the paper topics.
Cheating policy: Cheating (from the official definition approved by the board of trustees) is defined as the act of obtaining, or attempting to obtain, or aiding another to obtain academic credit for work by the use of any dishonest, deceptive or fraudulent means.
Cheating is a violation of the Student Conduct Policy and will not be tolerated. Any student caught cheating will receive no credit for the assignment and I shall notify Student Services.
*This syllabus is subject to change at any time at the discretion of the instructor


Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2020
send message

    Main page