Ante-nicene fathers



Download 6.35 Mb.
Page122/127
Date31.05.2016
Size6.35 Mb.
1   ...   119   120   121   122   123   124   125   126   127

428428 Rom. v. 19.

429429 Gen. ii. 5.

430430 John i. 3.

431431 Matt. v. 5.

432432 Gal. iv. 4.

433433 Rom. i. 3, 4.

434434 In addition to the Greek text preserved by Theodoret in this place, we have for some way a Syriac translation, differing slightly from both Greek and Latin. It seems, however, to run smoother than either, and has therefore been followed by us.

435435 John iv. 6.

436436 Ps. lxix. 27.

437437 Matt. xxvi. 38.

438438 Rom. v. 14.

439439 Luke i. 38.

440440 Gen. ii. 25.

441441 This seems quite a peculiar opinion of Irenaeus, that our first parents, when created, were not of the age of maturity.

442442 Literally, “unless these bonds of union be turned backwards.”

443443 It is very difficult to follow the reasoning of Irenaeus in this passage. Massuet has a long note upon it, in which he sets forth the various points of comparison and contrast here indicated between Eve and Mary; but he ends with the remark, “haec certe et quae sequuntur, paulo subtiliora.”

444444 Matt. xix. 30, xx. 16.

445445 Ps. xlv. 17.

446446 Rev. i. 5.

447447 Comp. 1 Cor. xv. 20–22.

448448 Acts i. 7.

449449 Matt. xii. 29.

450450 Gen. i. 26.

451451 The old Latin translation is: “Sed non relictis ipsis patribus.” Grabe would cancel non, while Massuet pleads for retaining it. Harvey conjectures that the translator perhaps mistook ouk aneilhmhenwn for ouk analeleimenwn. We have followed Massuet, though we should prefer deleting non, were it not found in all the mss.MSS; .

452452 Gen. iii. 16, etc.

453453 Gen. iii. 14.

454454 Matt. xxv. 41. This reading of Irenaeus agrees with that of the Codex Bezae, at Cambridge.

455455 Gen. iv. 7, after LXX. version.

456456 The old Latin reads “parricidio.” The crime of parricide was alone known to the Roman law; but it was a generic term, including the murder of all near relations. All the editors have supposed that the original word was adelfoktonia, which has here been adopted.

457457 Prov. i. 7, ix. 10.

458458 Gen. iii. 13.

459459 Rom. vi. 7.

460460 Ps. xci. 13.

461461 Rev. xx. 2.

462462 Luke x. 19.

463463 1 Cor. xv. 26.

464464 1 Cor. xv. 54, 55.

465465 Luke xv. 4.

466466 An account of Tatian will be given in a future volume with his only extant work.

467467 His heresy being just a mixture of the opinions of the various Gnostic sects.

468468 1 Cor. xv. 22.

469469 Rom. v. 20.

470470 Though unnoticed by the editors, there seems a difficulty in the different moods of the two verbs, erubescant and concertant.

471471 “Initium et materiam apostasiae suae habens hominem:” the meaning is very obscure, and the editors throw no light upon it.

472472 Literally, “but he did not see God.” The translator is supposed to have read oiden, knew, for eiden, saw.

473473 Literally, “through the beginnings, the means, and the end.” These three terms refer to the Prophets, the Apostles, and the Church Catholic.

474474 The Latin is “solidam operationem,” which we know not how to translate, in accordance with the context, except as above.

475475 This seems to be the meaning conveyed by the old Latin, “quemadmodum aspiratio plasmationi.”

476476 1 Cor. xii. 28.

477477 Jer. ii. 13.

478478 i.e., the Spirit.

479479 Literally, “who have a foresight of morals”—qui morum providentiam habent. The meaning is very obscure. [Prov. xxii. 3, xxvii. 12.]

480480 The text is here very uncertain, but the above seems the probable meaning.

481481 Matt. v. 45.

482482 Plato, de Leg., iv. and p. 715, 16.

483483 In Timaeo, vi. p. 29.

484484 The Latin is “collectio eorum;” but what collectio here means, it is not easy to determine. Grabe, with much probability, deems it the representative of sustasi". Harvey prefers enqumhma: but it is difficult to perceive the relevancy of his references to the rhetorical syllogism.

485485 See book i. cap. xvi. note.

486486 This refers to the first volume only of the original series.

11 [The reader who marvels at the tedious recitals must note this (1) as proof of the author’s practical wisdom, and (2) as evidence of his fidelity in what he exhibits.]

22 Luke i. 2.

33 2 Tim. ii. 23.

44 [The solemnity of the apostolic testimonies against the crop of tares that was to spring up receives great illustration from Irenaeus. 1 John ii. 18.]

55 [2 Pet. ii. 19.]

66 [Rev. xii. 9. A little essay, Messias and Anti-Messias, by the Rev. C. I. Black, London (Masters, 1847), is commended to those who need light on this very mysterious subject.]

77 Gen. i. 26.

88 See iii. 6, 1.

99 [St. John xvii. 3.]

1010 Matt. xxiii. 9.

1111 Deut. xxxii. 1.

1212 Ps. cxxiv. 8.

1313 Isa. i. 2.

1414 Isa. xlii. 5.

1515 Matt. xi. 25; Luke x. 21.

1616 Deut. vi. 4.

1717 John v. 46, 47.

1818 Luke xvi. 31.

1919 Luke vi. 19.

2020 Isa. v. 12.

2121 Matt. v. 34.

2222 Isa. lxvi. 1.

2323 Matt. xxi. 13.

2424 Isa. i. 23.

2525 Jer. iv. 22.

2626 Matt. x. 6.

2727 John iv. 41.

2828 Rom. xi. 26.

2929 Gal. iii. 24.

3030 Num. xxi. 8.

3131 This passage is quoted by Augustine, in his treatise on original sin, written to oppose Pelagius (lib. i. c. ii.), about 400 A.D.

3232 John xii. 32, iii. 14.

3333 1 Cor. vii. 31.

3434 Ps. cii. 25–28. The cause of the difference in the numbering of the Psalms is that the Septuagint embraces in one psalm—the ninth—the two which form the ninth and tenth in the Hebrew text.

3535 Isa. li. 6.

3636 Matt. v. 35.

3737 [Jer. vii. 4. One of the most powerful arguments in all Scripture is contained in the first twelve verses of this chapter, and it rebukes an inveterate superstition of the human heart. Comp. Rev. ii. 5, and the message to Rome, Rom. xi. 21.]

3838 Isa. xxvii. 6.

3939 Luke xvi. 16.

4040 2 Sam. v. 7., where David is described as taking the stronghold of Zion from the Jebusites.

4141 The text fluctuates between “legis dationem” and “legis dationis.” We have followed the latter.

4242 Isa. i. 8.

4343 Mal. iv. 1.

4444 Matt. iii. 11, etc.

4545 Ps. xlix. 12.

4646 Eph. ii. 7.

4747 Isa. xlii. 10, etc.

4848 Isa. xii. 4.

4949 Matt. xxii. 29.

5050 Matt. xxii. 29, etc.; Ex. iii. 6.

5151 In the Septuagint and Vulgate versions, this story constitutes the fourteenth chapter of the book of Daniel. It is not extant in Hebrew, and has therefore been removed to the Apocrypha, in the Anglican canon [the Greek and St. Jerome’s] of Scripture, under the title of “Bel and the Dragon.”

5252 John xi. 25.

5353 Ps. xlv. 17.

5454 John viii. 56.

5555 Rom. iv. 3.

5656 Phil. ii. 15.

5757 Gen. xxii. 6.

5858 John viii. 56.

5959 Gen. xiv. 22.

6060 Matt. xi. 27; Luke x. 22.

6161 Not now to be found in Mark’s Gospel.

6262 Photius, 125, makes mention of Justin Martyr’s work, logoi kata Markiwno". See also Eusebius’s Ecclesiastical History, book iv. c. 18, where this passage of Irenaeus is quoted. [The vast importance of Justin’s startling remark is that it hinges on the words of Christ Himself, concerning His antecedents and notes as set forth in the Scriptures, St. John v. 30–39.]

6363 [A most emphatic and pregnant text which Irenaeus here expounds with great beauty. The reference (St. Matt. xi. 27) seems to have been inadvertently omitted in this place where the repetition is desirable.]

6464 The ordinary text reads cognoscunt, i.e., do know; but Harvey thinks it should be the future—cognoscent.

6565 Mark i. 24.

6666 Matt. iv. 3; Luke iv. 3.

6767 Singula, which with Massuet we here understand in the sense of singularia.

6868 Some, instead of significantibus, read signantibus, “stamping it as true.”

6969 Matt. xi. 27; Luke x. 22. Harvey observes here, that “it is remarkable that this text, having been correctly quoted a short time previously in accordance with the received Greek text, w ean boulhta" o uio" apakaluyai, the translator now not only uses the single verb revelaverit, but says pointedly that it was so written by the venerable author.” It is probable, therefore, that the previous passage has been made to harmonize with the received text by a later hand; with which, however, the Syriac form agrees.

7070 Gen. xvii. 17.

7171 The text has oculorum, probably by mistake for populorum.

7272 Luke ii. 29, etc.

7373 Luke iil 8.

7474 Luke i. 46.

7575 Gen. xv. 5.

7676 Matt. iii. 9.

7777 Rom. iv. 12; Gal. iv. 28.

7878 Matt. v. 14.

7979 John xiv. 6, 7.

8080 Gen. xviii. 1.

8181 Ex. iii. 7, 8.

8282 Massuet here observes, that the fathers called the Holy Spirit the similitude of the Son.

8383 Matt. xi. 27; Luke x. 22.

8484 Rom. iv. 3.

8585 Matt. viii. 11.

8686 Luke xiii. 28.

8787 Harvey prefers the singular—“hypocrite.”

8888 Luke xiii. 15, 16.

8989 The text here is rather uncertain. Harvey’s conjectural reading of et jam for etiam has been followed.

9090 Luke vi. 3, 4.

9191 This clause is differently quoted by Antonius Melissa and John Damascenus, thus: Pa" basileu" dikaio" eiratikhn ecei taxin, i.e., Every righteous king possesses a priestly order. Comp. 1 Pet. ii. 5, 9. [And with St. Peter’s testimony to the priesthood of the laity, compare the same under the law. Ex. xix. 6. The Western Church has recognised the “Episcopate ab extra” of sovereigns; while, in the East, it has grown into Caesaropapism.]

9292 Deut. xxxiii. 9.

9393 Num. xviii. 20.

9494 Deut. xviii. 1.

9595 Phil. iv. 17.

9696 Literally, “the Lord’s Levitical substance”—Domini Leviticam substantiam.

9797 Literally, “to take food from seeds.”

9898 Matt. x. 10.

9999 Num. xv. 32, etc.

100100 Matt. iii. 10.

101101 1 Cor. iii. 17.

102102 Matt. xiii. 52.

103103 Matt. xxiii. 34.

104104 Ps. xcvi. 1.

105105 Isa. xlii. 10, quoted from memory.

106106 Jer. xxxi. 31.

107107 Matt. xii. 6.

108108 John i. 50.

109109 These words of Scripture are quoted by memory from Phil. iii. 12, 1 Cor. iv. 4, and xiii. 9, 10. It is remarkable that the second is incorporated with the preceding in a similar way, in the ancient Italic version known as the St. Germain copy.

110110 Matt. v. 8.

111111 Isa. xxv. 9.

112112 1 Pet. i. 8.

113113 Rom. viii. 15.

114114 This is in accordance with Harvey’s text—“Maturescere profectum salutis.” Grabe, however, reads, “Maturescere prefectum salutis;” making this equivalent to “ad prefectam salutem.” In most mss.MSS; . “profectum” and “prefectum” would be written alike. The same word (“profectus”) occurs again almost immediately, with an evident reference to and comparison with this clause.

115115 2 Tim. iii. 7.

116116 Matt. xv. 3, 4.

117117 Another variation from the textus receptus borne out by the Codex Bezae, and some ancient versions.

118118 Ex. xx. 12, LXX.

119119 John v. 39, 40.

120120 John v. 46.

121121 See Gen. xviii. 13 and xxxi. 11, etc. There is an allusion here to a favourite notion among the Fathers, derived from Philo the Jew, that the name Israel was compounded from the three Hebrew words la har vya

, i.e., “the man seeing God.”



122122 Ex. iii. 4, etc.

123123 Feuardent infers with great probability from this passage, that Irenaeus, like Tertullian and others of the Fathers, connected the word Pascha with pascein, to suffer. [The LXX. constantly giving colour to early Christian ideas in this manner, they concluded, perhaps, that such coincidences were designed. The LXX. were credited with a sort of inspiration, as we learn from our author.]

124124 Latin, “et extremitatem temporum.”

125125 Deut. xvi. 5, 6.

126126 The Latin is, “laetifici oculi ejus a vino,” the Hebrew method of indicating comparison being evidently imitated.

127127 Gen. xlix. 10–12, LXX.

128128 Deut. xxxii. 6.

129129 Deut. xxviii. 66. Tertullian, Cyprian, and other early Fathers, agree with Irenaeus in his exposition of this text.

130130 Deut. xxxii. 6. “Owned thee,” i.e., following the meaning of the Hebrew, “owned thee by generation.”

131131 Matt. xiii. 17.

132132 Gen. i. 28.

133133 Matt. xxv. 21, etc.

134134 Ps. xxxv. 9.

135135 Or, “all those who were in the way of David”—omnes qui erant in via David, in dolore animae cognoverunt suum regem.

136136 Matt. xxi. 8.

137137 The Latin text is ambiguous: “dominabantur eorum, quibus ratio non constabat.” The rendering may be, “and ruled over those things with respect to which it was not right that they should do so.”

138138 Matt. xxi. 16; Ps. viii. 3.

139139 Isa. i. 22.

140140 Matt. xv. 3.

141141 Rom. xiii. 10.

142142 1 Cor. xiii. 13.

143143 1 Cor. xiii. 2.

144144 Matt. xxiii. 2–4.

145145 Isa. xxix. 13.

146146 Rom. x. 3, 4.

147147 Ex. iii. 7, 8.

148148 Matt. xix. 17, 18, etc.

149149 Harvey here remarks: “In a theological point of view, it should be observed, that no saving merit is ascribed to almsgiving: it is spoken of here as the negation of the vice of covetousness, which is wholly inconsistent with the state of salvation to which we are called.”
1   ...   119   120   121   122   123   124   125   126   127




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2020
send message

    Main page