Andrew c. Rudalevige



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ANDREW C. RUDALEVIGE

Department of Political Science rudaleva@dickinson.edu

Dickinson College http://users.dickinson.edu/~rudaleva

Carlisle, Pennsylvania 17013-2896 +44 (0)1632 452915





Education

Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Ph.D., June 2000; M.A., June 1997, Political Science.

Dissertation: Managing the President's Program: Centralization and Legislative Policy Formulation, 1949-96. (committee: Paul Peterson (chair), Matthew Dickinson, Richard Neustadt, Paul Pierson).

Awarded Toppan Prize as Harvard’s best dissertation in political science, 1999-00.


The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

B.A., June 1989, Political Science

General and departmental honors; Phi Beta Kappa; Student Marshal; National Merit Scholar


Professional Experience

TEACHING AND ADMINISTRATION


Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania

Director, Dickinson Humanities Program, London and Norwich, England, July 2007-present.

Associate Professor of Political Science, July 2004-present; Department Chair, 2006-07

Assistant Professor of Political Science, July 2000 - June 2004

Courses include introductory American government, the presidency, public administration, Congress, research methods, and freshman and senior seminars (on presidential power, presidential elections, legislative behavior, and policy implementation.) Teaching member of the interdisciplinary Policy Studies major. Elected member of all-campus Planning and Budget Committee, 2002-04. Co-director of 2003-04 U.S. State Department “Young Ambassadors” program hosted by Dickinson in Carlisle and Cairo, Egypt, through a Middle East Partnership Initiative grant, and of summer 2006 State Department Study of the U.S. Institute for Fulbright scholars in political economy. Site coordinator for Inter-University Consortium on Political and Social Research, 2003-present. Member, Global Education Steering Committee; Clarke Forum Steering Committee.


Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey

Visiting Scholar, Center for the Study of Democratic Politics, September 2004-June 2005. Awarded sabbatical-year research fellowship within the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.
Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Assistant Senior Tutor and Tutor in Government, Lowell House, September 1997 - June 2000

Assistant Head Tutor, Department of Government, September 1996 - June 1999

Teaching Fellow, September 1996   June 2000

Three time winner of university citation for undergraduate teaching excellence; in-residence administrator and adviser in 400-student undergraduate dormitory, with responsibility for overseeing House academic advising program; and academic counselor to undergraduate departmental concentrators, with additional responsibilities for Truman Scholarship nominations and senior honors program.



PUBLICATIONS
Books
The George W. Bush Legacy, edited with Colin Campbell and Bert A. Rockman (Washington: Congressional Quarterly Press, 2007).
The New Imperial Presidency: Renewing Presidential Power after Watergate (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2005). Named a Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 2006.
Managing the President’s Program: Presidential Leadership and Legislative Policy Formulation (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2002). Winner of the 2003 Richard E. Neustadt Prize honoring the best book on the presidency, awarded by the Presidency Research Group of the American Political Science Association.

Journal Articles
“’Worked Out in Fractions’: Neutral Competence, FDR, and the Bureau of the Budget,” with Matthew J. Dickinson. Congress and the Presidency 34 (Spring 2007): 1-26.
“The Decline and Resurgence and Decline (and Resurgence?) of Congress: Charting a New Imperial Presidency,” Presidential Studies Quarterly 36 (September 2006): 506-24. Reprinted in slightly different form as “A New Imperial Presidency?” in James P. Pfiffner and Roger H. Davidson, eds., Understanding the Presidency, 4th ed. (New York: Longman, 2007).
“The Structure of Leadership: Presidents, Hierarchies, and Information Flow,” Presidential Studies Quarterly 35 (June 2005): 333-60.
“Presidents, Responsiveness, and Competence: Revisiting the ‘Golden Age’ at the Bureau of the Budget,” with Matthew J. Dickinson. Political Science Quarterly 119 (Winter 2004-05): 633-54.
“What Should the President Know and When Should He Know It? Hierarchy and the Study of the Institutional Presidency,” Presidency Research Group Report 26 (Fall 2003): 1-.
“The Politics of ‘No Child Left Behind,’” Education Next 3 (Fall 2003): 63-70.
“Revisiting Midterm Loss: Referendum Theory and State Data,” American Politics Research 29 (January 2001): 25-46.


Book Chapters
“Structure and Science in Federal Education Research,” in Frederick M. Hess, ed., The Politics of Knowledge (Cambridge: Harvard Education Press, forthcoming 2008).
“’The Decider’: Issue Management in the Bush White House,” in Colin Campbell, Bert A. Rockman, and Andrew Rudalevige, eds., The George W. Bush Legacy (Washington: Congressional Quarterly Press, 2007).
“Legacies and Leadership in Context,” with Colin Campbell and Bert A. Rockman, in Campbell, Rockman, and Rudalevige, eds., The George W. Bush Legacy (Washington: Congressional Quarterly Press, 2007).
“Unilateral Powers of the Presidency,” in Michael Nelson, ed., Guide to the Presidency, 4th ed. (Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly Press, 2007).
“Inventing the Institutional Presidency: Entrepreneurship and the Rise of the Bureau of the Budget, 1939-1949,” in Stephen Skowronek and Matthew Glassman, eds., Formative Acts: American Politics in the Making (Philadelphia: Univ. of Pennsylvania Press, 2007).
“Opportunity Costs: The Politics of Federal Student Loans,” in Frederick M. Hess, ed., Footing the Tuition Bill (Washington: American Enterprise Institute Press, 2007).
“Adequacy, Accountability, and the Impact of the No Child Left Behind Act,” in Martin R. West and Paul E. Peterson, eds., School Money Trials: The Legal Pursuit of Educational Adequacy (Washington: Brookings Institution Press, 2007).
“George W. Bush and Congress: New Term, New Problems – Same Results?” in Robert Maranto, Douglas M. Brattebo, and Tom Lansford, eds., The Second Term of George W. Bush: Prospects and Perils (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006).
“Cabinet Government, American Style,” in Richard Ellis and Michael Nelson, eds., Debating the Presidency: Conflicting Perspectives on the American Executive (Washington: Congressional Quarterly Press, 2006).
“The Executive Branch and the Legislative Process,” in Joel D. Aberbach and Mark A. Peterson, eds., Institutions of American Democracy: The Executive Branch (New York: Oxford Univ. Press, 2005).
“The President and the Cabinet,” in Michael Nelson, ed., The Presidency and the Political System, 8th ed. (Washington: Congressional Quarterly Press, 2005).
“‘No Child Left Behind’: Forging a Congressional Compromise,’” in Paul E. Peterson and Martin R. West, eds., No Child Left Behind? The Politics and Practice of School Accountability (Washington: Brookings Institution Press, 2003).
“Presidential Management and the Politicized Presidency: Reagan and Centralization,” in Richard S. Conley, ed., Reassessing the Reagan Presidency (Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 2003).

Other Essays and Reviews
“Review of Balance of Forces: Separation of Powers Law in the Administrative State, by Harold H. Bruff,” Congress and the Presidency, forthcoming.
“Review of The America That Reagan Built, by J. David Woodard,” Political Science Quarterly, forthcoming.
“Civil Rights and Uncivil Wrongs”: review essay on Not a Suicide Pact, by Richard Posner, War by Other Means, by John Yoo, and Guantánamo and the Abuse of Presidential Power, by Joseph Margulies, Foreign Affairs 86 (January/February 2007): 148-54.
“A To-Do List for the 110th Congress,” NiemanWatchdog.org, Nieman Foundation for Journalism, Harvard University (November 8, 2006).
“Imperial Presidency, Invisible Congress,” NiemanWatchdog.org, Nieman Foundation for Journalism, Harvard University (November 15, 2005).
“Reform, or Séance? Seeking the ‘Spirit’ of No Child Left Behind,” Teachers College Record (August 10, 2005).
“Governance and the Nixon Administrative Legacy”: review essay on Empowering the White House: Governance under Nixon, Ford, and Carter, by Karen M. Hult and Charles E. Walcott, Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory 15 (January 2005): 167-70.
“Domestic Policy,” essay for The Presidency in Action, Miller Center of Public Affairs, University of Virginia, AmericanPresident.org [http://www.americanpresident.org/action/domestic_policy/a_index.shtml], last updated August 2004
1“Political Parties,” with John H. Fenton, essay-length entry in Encyclopedia Americana (Danbury, CT: Grolier, 2003) and on-line Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia.
“Review of Vicious Cycle: Presidential Decision Making in the American Political Economy, by Constantine J. Spiliotes,” Presidential Studies Quarterly 32 (December 2002): 828-30.
“Review of Good Advice: Information and Policy Making in the White House, by Daniel E. Ponder,” American Political Science Review 95 (March 2001): 218-219.

RECENT CONFERENCE AND WORKING PAPERS (full list available on request)


· “Institutionalizing Responsiveness: Roosevelt, Nixon, and the Evolution of the Office of Management and

Budget,” with Matthew J. Dickinson, paper to be presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, September 2007.


· “’Truth vs. Partisanship’: Structure and Science in Federal Education Research,” paper presented at the

conference “The Politics of Knowledge,” American Enterprise Institute, Washington, DC, May 2007.


· “The Administrative Presidency: A New Research Agenda,” roundtable presentation at the Annual Meeting of

the Midwest Political Science Association, Chicago, April 2007. Under review at Presidential Studies Quarterly.


· “Irreconcilable Differences? The Political Topography of Federal Student Loans,” paper presented at the

conference “Footing the Tuition Bill: New Developments in the Student Loan Industry,” American Enterprise Institute, Washington, DC, September 2006.


· “The Plot that Thickened: Inheriting the Administrative Presidency,” paper presented at the Annual Meeting of

the American Political Science Association, September 2006.


· “Adequacy, Accountability, and the Impact of ‘No Child Left Behind,’” Working Paper PEPG/05-27, Program

on Education Policy and Governance, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University,

October 2005.
· “Parsing the Politicized Presidency: Centralization and Politicization as Presidential Strategies for

Bureaucratic Control,” with David E. Lewis. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, September 2005. Winner, Presidency Research Group Founders’ Prize for best paper on the presidency at the APSA in 2005. Under review at the American Journal of Political Science.


· “Presidents, Responsiveness, and the Creation of the Office of Management and Budget,” with Matthew J.

Dickinson. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association, Chicago, April 2005.


· “New Congress, New Problems – Same Results? George W. Bush Meets the 109th Congress,” paper

presented at the Conference on the Second Term of George W. Bush: Prospects and Perils, Villanova University, January2005.


· “The Rise of the Bureau of the Budget, 1939-1949: Harold Smith and James E. Webb as Bureaucratic

Entrepreneurs,” paper presented at the Conference on American Political Development, Center for the Study of American Politics, Yale University, October 2004.


· “’Worked Out in Fractions’: Neutral Competence, FDR, and the Bureau of the Budget,” with Matthew J. Dickinson. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Chicago, September 2004.
· “Budgeting for the New Imperial Presidency, 1974-2004,” paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the

Midwest Political Science Association, Chicago, April 2004.


· “The ‘M’ in OMB: The Office of Management and Budget and Presidential Management of

the Executive Branch, 1939-2003,” paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia, August 2003.


· “Presidential Hierarchies and Decision Making,” paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association, Chicago, April 2003.
· “The Structure of Leadership: Information, Organization, and Presidential Decision Making,” paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston, August 2002. Winner, Presidency Research Group Founders’ Prize for best paper on the presidency at the APSA in 2002.
· “Accountability and Avoidance in the Bush Education Plan,” Working Paper PEPG/02-12, Program on Education Policy and Governance, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, June 2002.
· “Presidential Management and the Reagan Legislative Program: The Limits of Centralization,” paper presented at the Conference on the Reagan Presidency, University of California at Santa Barbara, March 2002.
Fellowships, Service, and Awards
· Program committee member and chair of executive politics section for the 2007 Midwest Political Science

Association meetings, Chicago


· Presidency Research Group prizes for the best paper on the presidency presented at the Annual Meetings of the APSA, awarded 2003 and 2006
· Visiting Research Scholar, Center for the Study of Democratic Politics, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and

International Affairs, Princeton University, 2004-05.


· Consulting Editor, AmericanPresident.org, Miller Center of Public Affairs, University of Virginia, 2004-.
· Annenberg Foundation Trust Project on the Institutions of Democracy, member, Commission on the

Executive Branch, 2003-05


· Presidency Research Group, Governing Council, 2003-present; Chair, Peck Award Subcommittee, 2005-06
· Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute, research grant funding work at the FDR Library, summer 2004.
· Presidency Research Group of the American Political Science Association Richard E. Neustadt Prize for the Best Book on the Presidency of 2002
· Dana Foundation internship award supporting research assistance, spring 2002.
· Harry S. Truman Institute, research grant funding work at the Truman Library, May 2001.
· Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Toppan Prize, recognizing the best dissertation upon a subject of

political science, June 2000.


· Gerald R. Ford Foundation, research grant funding work at the Ford Library, November 1999.
· Center for American Political Studies, Harvard University, research grant, Fall 1999.
· Certificates of Distinction in Teaching, Harvard University: Fall 1997; Spring 1998; Spring 1999.
· Mellon Foundation Dissertation Completion Fellowship, 1999-2000
· Mellon Foundation Dissertation Research Fellowship, Summer 1998
· Moody Fellowship, Lyndon Baines Johnson Foundation, funding work at the LBJ Library in Austin, Texas, October 1998
· Young Scholar Grant, Univ. of Maryland Center for Political Leadership and Participation, 1996


Government and Policy Experience
Massachusetts State Senator Michael J. Barrett

Chief of Staff, November 1991 - September 1994

Legislative Assistant, September 1989 - November 1991

Served as senator's ranking assistant, supervising staff within Boston State House office, assisting in the formation of policy goals for the office, and monitoring all office functions and activities surrounding the urban Middlesex and Suffolk district. Specific duties included budgetary and issue-area research and analysis, especially regarding human services, special education, and legislative rules reform; legislative drafting; serving as district designee to Watertown and Allston-Brighton neighborhood of Boston; press relations and communications work; and constituent assistance. Later worked full-time on senator’s gubernatorial campaign, as convention coordinator and policy analyst.


Town of Watertown, Massachusetts

Town Councilor, January 1994 - January 1996

Charter Commissioner, May 1996-August 1997

Elected in November 1993 to two-year term on nine-member governing body of Watertown, a 34,000-person municipality bordering Boston and Cambridge with a then-$52 million annual operating budget. Served as Chair, Committee on Rules and Ordinances; Vice-Chair, Committee on Education. Member, Massachusetts Municipal Councilors Association. Later appointed by President of the Town Council to serve on the Special Commission on the Review of the Watertown Home Rule Charter. Co-authored commission report and represented commission in public hearings.



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