American History Book Report



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Extra Credit Anytime Assignment #1 (10 points)

American History Book Report
Choose a book from the list below (or your own—just get approval), recommended especially for teen readers. Please do not use SparkNotes or other “cheat” versions of these books. As you read, think about how you’ll respond to the text in a book report. Guidelines are below.
Heading: 

Should contain: Student name, period, book title, author, number of pages

 

1st paragraph   Introduction

            Begin with an attention getting lead drawing the reader in. Consider using a quote from the book, a description of a character, a shocking statement, or general to specific topic. Use interesting sentences, to give the book’s title, author, book genre (fiction, non-fiction, historical, biography, etc.) Remember to note any outstanding awards or quotes from outsider reviewers. Finally, write a thesis statement summarizing what the entire book was about.

 

2nd paragraph   Synopsis of Book

             A synopsis is a quick overview of the book’s plot, setting, and main characters. Be sure not to give too much away! You should consider specific characters or situations in the book that made it entertaining, thought provoking, or fun. What made the book worth remembering and sharing? Are there elements of writing style that the reader might like to know about (flashbacks, flash-forwards, realistic dialogues, imagery, important theme).

 

3rd paragraph   Closing

             You should include your personal viewpoint of how you felt about the book and why. Give positives (or negatives) with specific examples of why you felt that way. What would your recommendation or opinion be as to whether that reader will or will not like the book…and is it worth the time to read? The conclusion should have a strong ending that refers back to the lead and gives the reader something to remember.



 

3 paragraphs in length (6-7 sentences per paragraph) – 1 page typed – 2 pages handwritten




Non-Fiction

Author

The Guns of August

Barbara Tuchman

The Discoverers: A History of Man’s Search to Know His World and Himself

Daniel J. Boorstin

Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era

James M. McPherson

Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community and War

Nathaniel Philbrick

Black Like Me

John Howard Griffin

The Right Stuff

Tom Wolfe

The Tycoons: How Andrew Carnegie, J.D. Rockefeller, Jay Gould, and J.P. Morgan Invented the American Supereconomy

Charles R. Morris

Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption

Laura Hillenbrand

I Have Lived a Thousand Years: Growing Up in the Holocaust

Livia Bitton-Jackson

Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal

Eric Schlosser







Fiction

Author

Invisible Man

Ralph Ellison

The Things They Carried

Tim O’Brien

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

Betty Smith

The Jungle

Upton Sinclair

The Watsons Go to Birmingham 1963

Christopher Paul Curtis

The Absolutely True Story of a Part-Time Indian

Sherman Alexie

To Kill a Mockingbird

Harper Lee

The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing

Matthew Tobin Anderson

The Grapes of Wrath

John Steinbeck

Hiroshima

John Hersey

Purple Daze

Sherry Shahan

Hurricane Song: A Novel of New Orleans

Paul Volponi

Everything is Illuminated or Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

Jonathan Safran Foer

Life: An Exploded Diagram

Mal Peet

Extra Credit Anytime Assignment #2 (10 points)

American History-Theme Movies
Choose a movie from the list below (or your own—just get approval). Please do not use IMDB, Netflix, or other pre-written descriptions as “your” report. As you watch, think about how you’ll respond to the text in a book report. Guidelines are below.
Heading: 

Should contain: Student name, period, movie title, author, running time

 

1st paragraph   Introduction

            Begin with an attention getting lead drawing the reader in. Consider using a quote from the movie, a description of a character, a shocking statement, or general to specific topic. Use interesting sentences, to give a description of the movie (fiction, non-fiction, historical, biography, etc.) Remember to note any outstanding awards or quotes from outsider reviewers. Finally, write a thesis statement summarizing what the entire movie was about.

 

2nd paragraph   Synopsis of Movie

             A synopsis is a quick overview of the movie’s plot, setting, and main characters. Be sure not to give too much away! You should consider specific characters or situations in the movie that made it entertaining, thought provoking, or fun. What made the movie worth remembering and sharing? Are there elements of film style that the reader might like to know about (flashbacks, flash-forwards, realistic dialogues, imagery, important theme).

 

3rd paragraph   Closing

             You should include your personal viewpoint of how you felt about the movie and why. Give positives (or negatives) with specific examples of why you felt that way. What would your recommendation or opinion be as to whether that reader will or will not like the movie…and is it worth the time to watch? The conclusion should have a strong ending that refers back to the lead and gives the reader something to remember.



 

3 paragraphs in length (6-7 sentences per paragraph) – 1 page typed – 2 pages handwritten



Title/Era

Rating

Pre-U.S. History




The New World

PG-13

The Crucible

PG-13













American Revolutionary Era




John Adams (Miniseries)

TV Miniseries

The Crossing

TV Movie

1776

Musical

The Patriot

R

Roots

TV Miniseries







Early 19th century




Last of the Mohicans

R

Amistad

R

12 Years a Slave

R

Amazing Grace (end of British slave trade)

PG

The Alamo

PG-13

Gangs of New York

R







American Civil War




Unchained Memories: Readings from Slave Narratives (documentary)

Not rated

Gettysburg

PG-13

Lincoln

PG-13

Glory

R

The Civil War: A Film by Ken Burns (documentary)

Unrated

The Conspirator

PG-13







Post-Civil War to 1900




Dances with Wolves

PG-13

The Assassination of Jesse James…

R

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee

TV Movie

Into the West

TV Miniseries







Early 20th century




Modern Times (silent film starring Charlie Chaplin)

Not rated (G)

Mr. Smith Goes to Washington

PG-13

Iron Jawed Angels

PG-13

All Quiet on the Western Front (1979) or 2015*

TV Movie

Prohibition: A Film by Ken Burns (documentary)

Unrated

Changeling

R

Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?

PG-13







World War II & Cold War/Space Age




Saving Private Ryan

R

Letters from Iwo Jima

R

Unbreakable

R

Patton

PG

The Great Escape

Unrated

Apollo-13

PG

October Sky

PG

Good Night, and Good Luck

PG

The Right Stuff

PG

The Crucible

PG-13

The Manchurian Candidate (1962)

Unrated













Civil Rights Movement




Malcolm X

PG-13

Ghosts of Mississippi

PG-13

Lee Daniels’ The Butler

PG-13

Thirteen Days

PG-13

The Help

PG-13

Selma

PG-13

Remember the Titans

PG-13

Men of Honor

R







Late 20th century/Early 21st century




All the President’s Men

PG

Frost/Nixon

R














Extra Credit Anytime Assignment #3 (10 points)

Field Trip!
With the nation's capital just a mile away, sometimes it's easy to overlook some of the amazing monuments, structures, and culture D.C. has to offer. On your own, with friends, or with family, take a field trip to learn more about the history surrounding you! Each field trip taken with completed report will earn you up to 10 points extra credit.
Going out of state? Visit a historical site, fill out the form, and it's still worth extra credit! :)

 

FIELD TRIP FORM


Name:

Period:

Date(s) of visit:
Place visited:


Write a 2 paragraph description of what you learned/gained from the experience and its significance to your learning of American History.

Include a picture of yourself/the group.

Extra Credit Anytime Assignment #4 (5 points)

American History-Theme Advertisement/Poster
Have you ever thought, “I would totally be into history if it were cooler”? One way society figures out whats “hip” and what’s not is through advertising. Think about how you might advertise a famous American person, event, or landmark, and create a poster that could show up in the pages of your favorite magazine or online site. Guidelines are below!
REQUIREMENTS


  1. A large title with the person/event/landmark’s name (you can stylize it—for example, Gene Jones suggests “KGIII” as King George III)

  2. Basic information:

    1. Who/what is this?

    2. Why is it significant to America?

    3. Where would we find it?

    4. When was it alive/did it happen/was it built?

    5. A famous quote or fact about the person/event/landmark

  3. Image(s)! If you choose to cut/paste from the internet, it should be in color—remember, this is supposed to be eye-catching!

  4. A works cited page on the back with your sources. Please use reputable sources—Wikipedia is not a source in itself; neither is Yahoo! Answers or any other similar blog site. You must include a works cited page to receive a grade for your poster.

    1. Any copying or plagiarism will result in a zero for the assignment.




Image: http://www.bitrebels.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/Quotes-Innovators-In-History-1.jpg


Extra Credit Anytime Assignment #5 (10 points)

Political Cartoon Analysis
American history isn’t just for textbooks—you’re living it right now! One way to figure out how America and the world views itself and our past is through analyzing and understanding political cartoons.

Directions:


1. Find a cartoon on your own, or link here to find a whole bunch of political cartoons.
http://www.cagle.com/

2. Find a cartoon on a topic that you believe relates in some way to our current topic of study in class. (Example: During the first quarter, we're studying the Constitution. Find a topic that relates to some sort of constitutional issue. If we're studying the Great Depression, find topics that are Depression related, etc.) YES, THIS WILL TAKE SOME THINKING. THAT'S THE POINT!



3. Analyze the cartoon using the HAPPY technique. (Don’t remember how to do it? Check the “Writing & Analysis” page on my website!

4. Write a quick report with the following information:



  • Identify the cartoon by author, date of publication and name of publication


  • Explain the point of view of the cartoon. (What message is the author attempting to convey?)

  • Provide a detailed explanation of how the issue in the cartoon relates to our current area of study.

Note: You may not find a cartoon that is directly related to a topic of study. (i.e. there are probably no cartoons on the Great Depression. But you may find a cartoon related to economic issues such as: Governments role in the economic system, poverty, social security, etc. You will need to be creative in your thinking. What is important is linking with the concepts we are currently studying, not the exact same topic.)



Extra Credit Anytime Assignment #6 (5 points)

Create your own US History-themed Quarter
Beginning in the late 1990s, the United States Mint began to create coins commemorating each of the 50 United States and its territories. Since then, this has grown to include national parks and other national monuments. Now it’s your turn to create a design that you think best represents an important person, place, or event in American history.
Directions:
1. Look at the quarters that have already been minted. Website: http://www.usmint.gov/mint_programs/50sq_program/

Choose a state coin of interest and explain the parts of its design:



  1. State name:

  2. Year founded:

  3. Symbols included on the coin and what each means (minimum of 3):

2. Create your own coin, keeping in mind that you need to include the following items:

  1. Name of event/person/item and date(s) associated with it

  2. At least two important symbols that you believe best represent your chosen topic.

  3. A brief explanation (2-3 sentences) about the importance of the topic you chose and why you chose the symbols for your coin.

  4. Template is below!

Name:


Period:




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