America Singing: Nineteenth-Century Song Sheets



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America Singing: Nineteenth-Century Song Sheets
Lament of the Irish immigrant. Andrews, Printer, No. 38 Chatham Street, N. Y. [n. d.]
Impact of Immigration on America

Sarah Geiger

Northwest High School

Fall 2010

Does America change immigrants or do immigrants change America? What are the experiences of immigrants to the United States like? Do they differ over time or by nation of origin? Students will investigate the immigrant experience in America using a variety of primary documents and create a visual representation of their findings. Students also develop an opinion based on their research and present it in an analytical essay.


Overview/ Materials/Historical Background/LOC Resources/Standards/ Procedures/Evaluation/Rubric/Handouts/Extension


Overview Back to Navigation Bar

Objectives

Students will:

  • Use primary resources to analyze American History.

  • Investigate the experiences of immigrants from a specific country

  • Compare a variety of sources to identify common themes and differences

  • Create a poster board that depicts their interpretation of immigration in America using the sources

  • Write an analytical essay in response to an essential question




Recommended time frame

Approx 2 weeks


Grade level

10-12


Curriculum fit

American History


Materials

Analysis Worksheets (attached)

* Interview Analysis Questions/Activity

* Portrait Analysis Questions/Activity

* Document Analysis Questions/Activity

* Poster Analysis Activity

* Photo Analysis Questions/Activity


Websites/ Internet Databases:

Immigration: The Changing Face of America

Interviews with Today’s Immigrants

NPR: Immigration in America Survey

American Potluck


Ohio State Learning Standards Back to Navigation Bar




Social Studies:

History

Industrialization

1. Explain the effects of industrialization in the United States

in the 19th century including:

b. Immigration and child labor and their impact on the

labor force;

The United States in

the 20th Century

9. Analyze the major political, economic and social

developments of the 1920s including:

d. Immigration restrictions, nativism, race riots and the

reemergence of the Ku Klux Klan;

12. Explain major domestic developments after 1945 with

emphasis on:

d. Immigration patterns.



People in Societies

Diffusion 5. Explain the effects of immigration on society in the United

States:


a. Housing patterns;

b. Political affiliation;

c. Education system;

d. Language;

e. Labor practices;

f. Religion.



Movement 3. Analyze the geographic processes that contributed to

changes in American society including:

c. Immigration.


Procedures Back to Navigation Bar




Some Previous Knowledge Necessary :

Students should have basic knowledge of at least one of the major periods of immigration in American history. The unit is best used as an enrichment project after completing units covering through the 1920’s. The broad nature of the topic gives some flexibility as to the timing.


Day 1: Introduction of unit and materials

  • Before the first day of the unit students should read the excerpt from American Crucible as homework.

  • Give students the provided resources printed as a unit packet. Provide overview of the project, rubric and show students the web sites they will be using on the SmartBoard.

  • Introduce students to the key question of the unit:

--Is America
A. A country with a basic American


culture and values that

immigrants take on when they

come here, OR

B. A country made up of many

cultures and values that change as

new people come here
Days 2 & 3: Exploration

  • Students will go to the Immigration: The Changing Face of America website and choose a country from the left-hand panel

  • Students will explore that country and take notes on the main ideas they discover

  • Students will then go to the Interviews with Today’s Immigrants website and find interviews with immigrants from the same country (Note: If there are no interviews available from the same country, students may choose a nearby country in the same region)

  • Students take notes on the themes they identify in the interviews


Day 4-5: Compiling Information

  • Students synthesize their discoveries about immigrants from their country, comparing and contrasting different accounts, time periods and documents

  • Students use the computer lab to view the Primary Resources (below) from the Library of Congress regarding immigrants and immigration

  • For each primary source, students must complete the appropriate Activity Analysis Worksheet (attached)


Day 6-8: Synthesis

  • Students will now bring all their discoveries and ideas together in finished products—a paper and a poster board

  • Students will make a poster board using images from the Library of Congress, clippings, quotes and drawings to present their findings visually

  • Students will write a 3-5 page essay that addresses the key question of the unit (above) using the documents to back up their opinion

Day 9-10: Reflection

  • Students will present their poster boards and explain the position they took in answering the key question

  • Teacher will direct students to the NPR: Immigration in America Survey website and present the findings of the survey (PDF or PowerPoint format using SmartBoard

  • Students discuss the results of the official survey and determine whether their positions in the class reflect the opinions expressed in the survey

Evaluation Back to Navigation Bar




Using the primary sources and the websites, create a poster board and a 3-5 page essay in response to the key question of the unit. Students will also be evaluated on their presentations of the poster boards. Rubric attached.

Extension Back to Navigation Bar




A way to extend the unit would be to have students prepare a recipe (preferably from the country they chose to investigate) from the American Potluck cookbook from the Library of Congress and bring it in to share. Students could have an Immigration Potluck of sorts.


Primary Resources from the Library of Congress

Back to Navigation Bar


Primary Source

Citation

Description

url

don\'t bite the hand that\'s feeding you [sheet music]

Don't bite the hand that's feeding you. Morgan, Jimmie Composer. Hoier, Thomas Lyricist. Notated music New York Leo Feist 1915 sheet music access 1 score reformatted digital adult 56/3790 100007833 7154 edison Edison Sheet Music IHAS Performing Arts Encyclopedia Music Division DLC IHAS 050531 loc.natlib.ihas.100007833

Song warning immigrants to remain grateful to ‘Uncle Sam’

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/diglib/ihas/loc.natlib.ihas.100007833/default.html


http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/realaudio.gif

Library of Congress Motion Picture, Broadcasting and Recorded Sound Division, Edison Diamond Disc 50357-R

Audio recording of ‘Don’t Bite the Hand That’s Feeding You’

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/papr:@field(NUMBER+@band(edrs+50357r))




America Singing: Nineteenth-Century Song Sheets
Lament of the Irish immigrant. Andrews, Printer, No. 38 Chatham Street, N. Y. [n. d.]

Song about missing home in Ireland

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/amss:@field(DOCID+@lit(as107440))





Library of Congress Motion Picture, Broadcasting and Recorded Sound Division, lcmp002 m2a29915 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.mbrsmi/lcmp002.m2a29915


In certain sections of New York City large numbers of Jewish and Italian push-cart vendors congregate so closely along the sidewalks that they interfere with traffic. Policemen keep them moving. The picture shows how the frightened peddlers hurry away when a bluecoat appears. Some of the carts are piled high with fruits of all kinds, and it is interesting and amusing to see the expressions of combined fear and anxiety on the faces of the men as they hurry away; the fear of being arrested if they stand, and of losing some of their wares if the carts strike an obstruction in the street.

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/papr:@filreq(@field(NUMBER+@band(lcmp002+m2a29915))+@field(COLLID+newyork))





Immigrant laborers in the early 20th century, The Coal River Folklife Collection (AFC 1999/008), afccmns 161003

Interview about immigrant workers

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/cmns:@field(DOCID+@lit(cmns001732))




The Abraham Lincoln Papers at the Library of Congress
Series 1. General Correspondence. 1833-1916.
F. E. Leseure to Abraham Lincoln, Thursday, July 26, 1860 (Wants Lincoln's opinion on foreigners)

Letter asking Abraham Lincoln what he thinks about foreigners

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=mal&fileName=mal1/034/0341000/malpage.db&recNum=0




Street Cries and Criers of New York, American Life Histories: Manuscripts from the Federal Writers' Project, 1936-1940,

Transcript of street calls of immigrant pushcart merchants in New York

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/mcc,gottscho,detr,nfor,wpa,aap,cwar,bbpix,cowellbib,calbkbib,consrvbib,bdsbib,dag,fsaall,gmd,pan,vv,presp,varstg,suffrg,nawbib,horyd,wtc,toddbib,mgw,ncr,ngp,musdibib,hlaw,papr,lhbumbib,rbpebib,lbcoll,alad,hh,aaodyssey,magbell,bbc,dcm,raelbib,runyon,dukesm,lomaxbib,mtj,gottlieb,aep,qlt,coolbib,fpnas,aasm,denn,relpet,amss,aaeo,mff,afc911bib,mjm,mnwp,rbcmillerbib,molden,ww2map,mfdipbib,afcnyebib,klpmap,hawp,omhbib,rbaapcbib,mal,ncpsbib,ncpm,lhbprbib,ftvbib,afcreed,aipn,cwband,flwpabib,wpapos,cmns,psbib,pin,coplandbib,cola,tccc,curt,mharendt,lhbcbbib,eaa,haybib,mesnbib,fine,cwnyhs,svybib,mmorse,afcwwgbib,mymhiwebib,uncall,afcwip,mtaft,manz,llstbib,fawbib,berl,fmuever,cdn,upboverbib,mussm,cic,afcpearl,awh,awhbib,sgp,wright,lhbtnbib,afcesnbib,hurstonbib,mreynoldsbib,spaldingbib,sgproto,scsmbib:@field(DOCID+@lit(wpa223060109))




The Heart of the Immigrant, Redpath Chautauqua Collection. University of Iowa Libraries
Special Collections Department
Iowa City, IA 52242-1420

Play bill featuring immigrant themes

http://sdrcdata.lib.uiowa.edu/libsdrc/details.jsp?id=/adaroach/1
























Rubric



Back to Navigation Bar

Analysis Paper Rubric

Student Name:     ________________________________________









CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Quality of Information

Information clearly relates to the main topic. It includes several supporting details and/or examples.

Information clearly relates to the main topic. It provides 1-2 supporting details and/or examples.

Information clearly relates to the main topic. No details and/or examples are given.

Information has little or nothing to do with the main topic.

Amount of Information

All topics are addressed and all questions answered with at least 2 sentences about each.

All topics are addressed and most questions answered with at least 2 sentences about each.

All topics are addressed, and most questions answered with 1 sentence about each.

One or more topics were not addressed.

Sources

All sources (information and graphics) are accurately documented in the desired format.

All sources (information and graphics) are accurately documented, but a few are not in the desired format.

All sources (information and graphics) are accurately documented, but many are not in the desired format.

Some sources are not accurately documented.

Internet Use

Successfully uses suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance.

Usually able to use suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance.

Occasionally able to use suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance.

Needs assistance or supervision to use suggested internet links and/or to navigate within these sites.

Organization

Information is very organized with well-constructed paragraphs and subheadings.

Information is organized with well-constructed paragraphs.

Information is organized, but paragraphs are not well-constructed.

The information appears to be disorganized. 8)



Poster Board Rubric

Student Name:     ________________________________________









CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Required Elements

The poster includes all required elements as well as additional information.

All required elements are included on the poster.

All but 1 of the required elements are included on the poster.

Several required elements were missing.

Content - Accuracy

At least 7 accurate facts are displayed on the poster.

5-6 accurate facts are displayed on the poster.

3-4 accurate facts are displayed on the poster.

Less than 3 accurate facts are displayed on the poster.

Graphics - Relevance

All graphics are related to the topic and make it easier to understand. All borrowed graphics have a source citation.

All graphics are related to the topic and most make it easier to understand. All borrowed graphics have a source citation.

All graphics relate to the topic. Most borrowed graphics have a source citation.

Graphics do not relate to the topic OR several borrowed graphics do not have a source citation.

Labels

All items of importance on the poster are clearly labeled with labels that can be read from at least 3 ft. away.

Almost all items of importance on the poster are clearly labeled with labels that can be read from at least 3 ft. away.

Several items of importance on the poster are clearly labeled with labels that can be read from at least 3 ft. away.

Labels are too small to view OR no important items were labeled.

Knowledge Gained

Student can accurately answer all questions related to facts in the poster and processes used to create the poster.

Student can accurately answer most questions related to facts in the poster and processes used to create the poster.

Student can accurately answer about 75% of questions related to facts in the poster and processes used to create the poster.

Student appears to have insufficient knowledge about the facts or processes used in the poster.

Use of Class Time

Used time well during each class period. Focused on getting the project done. Never distracted others.

Used time well during each class period. Usually focused on getting the project done and never distracted others.

Used some of the time well during each class period. There was some focus on getting the project done but occasionally distracted others.

Did not use class time to focus on the project OR often distracted others.

Oral Presentation Rubric


Student Name:     ________________________________________







CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Comprehension

Student is able to accurately answer almost all questions posed by classmates about the topic.

Student is able to accurately answer most questions posed by classmates about the topic.

Student is able to accurately answer a few questions posed by classmates about the topic.

Student is unable to accurately answer questions posed by classmates about the topic.

Content

Shows a full understanding of the topic.

Shows a good understanding of the topic.

Shows a good understanding of parts of the topic.

Does not seem to understand the topic very well.

Preparedness

Student is completely prepared and has obviously rehearsed.

Student seems pretty prepared but might have needed a couple more rehearsals.

The student is somewhat prepared, but it is clear that rehearsal was lacking.

Student does not seem at all prepared to present.


Handouts

Back to Navigation Bar
Interview Analysis Questions:

1. What is the general tone or attitude of the person being interviewed?

2. What do you infer about the person/family from their tone or vocabulary as recorded in the interview?

3. What are the circumstances of this person's life?

4. What seems to have led to these circumstances?

5. What can you infer about the general emotional state of this person from what he/she says?

6. Is there anything interesting or surprising about the situation represented by this interview?

7. What problems or frustrations is the interviewee dealing with?

8. If you had some power or authority and could make something good happen, something realistic, what would you propose as a way to help the interviewee improve his/her circumstances?


Portrait Analysis Questions
1. What, if anything, can you determine from examining the facial features and expressions in the portraits you studied?

2. What do you notice about the lighting in the photographs? How does the lighting influence your response to the pictures?

3. What do you notice about the ways the subjects are posed? What do you think the photographer was trying to suggest about the subjects based on the pose?

4. Are there any other objects or details in the background that suggest something about the subject's character or situation?

5. How do the captions for the portrait or photo tend to influence the reader's opinion of the individuals? What clues in the captions may indicate a bias?

6. Which portrait is your favorite? Why? Write a caption for that portrait explaining why you think it is an excellent example of the art of portraiture.



Written Document Analysis Worksheet


TYPE OF DOCUMENT (Check one):





Newspaper




Map




Advertisement




Congressional Record




Letter




Telegram




Patent




Press Release




Census Report




Memorandum




Report




Other

UNIQUE PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE DOCUMENT (Check one or more):




Interesting Letterhead




Notations




Handwritten




“Received” stamp




Typed




Seals




Other







DATE(S) OF DOCUMENT:



AUTHOR (OR CREATOR) OF THE DOCUMENT:



POSITION (TITLE):



FOR WHAT AUDIENCE WAS THE DOCUMENT WRITTEN?



DOCUMENT INFORMATION (There are many possible ways to answer A-E.)
A. List three things the author said that you think are important:

B. Why do you think this document was written?


C. What evidence in the document helps you know why it was written? Quote from the document.


D. List two things the document tells you about life in the United States at the time it was written.


E. Write a question to the author that is left unanswered by the document:





Poster Analysis Worksheet
1. What are the main colors used in the poster?

2. What symbols (if any) are used in the poster?

3. If a symbol is used, is it
a. clear (easy to interpret)?

b. memorable?

c. dramatic?

4. Are the messages in the poster primarily visual, verbal, or both?

5. Who do you think is the intended audience for the poster?
6. What does the Government hope the audience will do?
7. What Government purpose(s) is served by the poster?
8. The most effective posters use symbols that are unusual, simple, and direct. Is this an effective poster?

Photo Analysis Worksheet
Step 1. Observation
Study the photograph for 2 minutes. Form an overall impression of the photograph and then examine individual items. Next, divide the photo into quadrants and study each section to see what new details become visible.
Use the chart below to list people, objects, and activities in the photograph.


Activities

People

Objects



















































Step 2. Inference
Based on what you have observed above, list three things you might infer from this photograph
1.

2.

3.



Step 3. Questions
What questions does this photograph raise in your mind?

Where could you find answers to them?



Designed and developed by the Education Staff, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC 20408

Music/Lyrics Analysis Worksheet


Step 1. Pre-listening / reading


Who wrote and/or Recorded this music and the song / lyrics?


What is the date of the publication or recording?


Where was this song written or recorded?



Step 2. Post-listening / reading (or repeated exposure)


What people, places, and events are listed in the song?

People


Places


Events


What is the overall mood of this song?


For what audience was the song written?

List two things this sound recording tells you about life at the time period of the recording.


Write a question to author or performer of this song.


Why do you think the artist created this song? What evidence do you find to suggest this?





Teaching with Primary Sources color

Illinois State University




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