Alliance Advantage – Champs Lab 2010



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WNDI 2010

Champs Alliance Advantage

Alliance Advantage – Champs Lab 2010





Alliance Advantage – Champs Lab 2010 1

***Futenma Hurts Alliance*** 2

Futenma Hurts Alliance - Infighting 3

Futenma Hurts Alliance – Spillover 4

Futenma Hurts Alliance – Japanese Backlash 5

Futenma Hurts Alliance – Spillover 6

Futenma Hurts Alliance – Rape and Protests 7

Futenma Hurts Alliance - Infighting 8

Futenma Hurts Alliance – Japanese Backlash 9

Futenma Hurts Alliance - Spillover 10

Futenma Hurts Alliance – Spillover 11

Futenma Hurts Alliance - Spillover 12

***Solvency*** 13

Solvency – Ending Futenma Dispute Boosts Alliance 14

Solvency – Better Strategic Partnership 15

Solvency – Restructures the Alliance 16

Solvency – Increases Alliance Sustainibility 17

Solvency – Increases Alliance Confidence 18

Solvency – Restructures the Alliance 19

Solvency – Restructures the Alliance 20

Solvency – Sustainable Alliance 21

Japan-U.S. Alliance Good – Nuclear War 25

Japan-U.S. Alliance Good – Regional Stability and Environment 26

Japan-U.S. Alliance Good – Regional Stability 27

Japan-U.S. Alliance Good – Regional Stability 28

Japan-U.S. Alliance Good – Asian Economy 29

Japan-U.S. Alliance Good – Regional Stability and Prolif 30

Japan-U.S. Alliance Good – Japanese Stability 31

Japan-U.S. Alliance Good – Regional Stability 32

Japan-U.S. Alliance Good – Regional Stability 33

Japan-U.S. Alliance Good – Regional Stability 34

Japan-U.S. Alliance Good – Regional Stability and Prolif 35

Japan-U.S. Alliance Good – Japanese Stability 36

Japan-U.S. Alliance Good – Regional Stability 37

Japan-U.S. Alliance Good – Regional Stability 38

Japan-U.S. Alliance Good – Regional Stability and Asian Economy 39

Japan-U.S. Alliance Good – Regional Stability 40

Japan-U.S. Alliance Good – Regional Stability 41

Japan-U.S. Alliance Good – Sino-Russia Alliance (1/2) 47

Japan-U.S. Alliance Good – Sino-Russia Alliance (2/2) 48

*** AT: Okinawa Key To Heg *** 49

AT: Okinawa Key To Heg – Okinawa Kills Heg 50

*** AT: Japan Rearm Bad *** 51

AT: Japan Rearm – Japan has Military Force Now 52

AT: Japan Rearm Bad – Japan has Military Force Now 54

Power Projection- Strong Military 57

AT: Deterrence Good – Chinese Missiles 59



***Futenma Hurts Alliance***

Futenma Hurts Alliance - Infighting



Okinawa is the largest threat to the US-Japan alliance – the US refuses to relocate troops unless a new base is built on Okinawa

Eric Talmadge, writer for the Associated Press, 06-22-2010, “US-Japan security pact turns 50, faces new strains” Businessweek http://www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D9GG68080.htm

But while the alliance is one of the strongest Washington has anywhere in the world, it has come under intense pressure lately over a plan to make sweeping reforms that would pull back roughly 8,600 Marines from Okinawa to the U.S. Pacific territory of Guam. The move was conceived in response to opposition on Okinawa to the large U.S. military presence there -- more than half of the U.S. troops in Japan are on Okinawa, which was one of the bloodiest battlefields of World War II. Though welcomed by many at first, the relocation plan has led to renewed Okinawan protests over the U.S. insistence it cannot be carried out unless a new base is built on Okinawa to replace one that has been set for closing for more than a decade. A widening rift between Washington and Tokyo over the future of the Futenma Marine Corps Air Station was a major factor in the resignation of Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama earlier this month. It could well plague Kan as well.

Futenma Hurts Alliance – Spillover



The Futenma dispute must be solved – failure to resolve it creates a domino effect that would cripple the alliance in the long term

John Feffer, co-director of Foreign Policy in Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies, 03-06-2010, “Okinawa and the new domino effect” Asia Times http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Japan/LC06Dh01.html

You’d think that, with so many Japanese bases, the United States wouldn’t make a big fuss about closing one of them. Think again.  The current battle over the Marine Corps air base at Futenma on Okinawa -- an island prefecture almost 1,000 miles south of Tokyo that hosts about three dozen U.S. bases and 75% of American forces in Japan -- is just revving up.  In fact, Washington seems ready to stake its reputation and its relationship with a new Japanese government on the fate of that base alone, which reveals much about U.S. anxieties in the age of Obama. What makes this so strange, on the surface, is that Futenma is an obsolete base. Under an agreement the Bush administration reached with the previous Japanese government, the U.S. was already planning to move most of the Marines now at Futenma to the island of Guam. Nonetheless, the Obama administration is insisting, over the protests of Okinawans and the objections of Tokyo, on completing that agreement by building a new partial replacement base in a less heavily populated part of Okinawa. The current row between Tokyo and Washington is no mere “Pacific squall,” as Newsweek dismissively described it. After six decades of saying yes to everything the United States has demanded, Japan finally seems on the verge of saying no to something that matters greatly to Washington, and the relationship that Dwight D. Eisenhower once called an “indestructible alliance” is displaying ever more hairline fractures. Worse yet, from the Pentagon’s perspective, Japan’s resistance might prove infectious -- one major reason why the United States is putting its alliance on the line over the closing of a single antiquated military base and the building of another of dubious strategic value. During the Cold War, the Pentagon worried that countries would fall like dominoes before a relentless Communist advance. Today, the Pentagon worries about a different kind of domino effect. In Europe, NATO countries are refusing to throw their full support behind the U.S. war in Afghanistan. In Africa, no country has stepped forward to host the headquarters of the Pentagon’s new Africa Command. In Latin America, little Ecuador has kicked the U.S. out of its air base in Manta.

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